Skip header and navigation

3 records – page 1 of 1.

Diagnostic tests, treatment and follow-up in heart failure patients--is there a gender bias in the coherence to guidelines?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52453
Source
Eur J Heart Fail. 1999 Dec;1(4):407-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1999
Author
M. Mejhert
J. Holmgren
P. Wändell
H. Persson
M. Edner
Author Affiliation
Division of Internal Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Danderyd Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Heart Fail. 1999 Dec;1(4):407-10
Date
Dec-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Echocardiography
Female
Guideline Adherence
Heart Failure, Congestive - diagnosis - mortality - therapy
Humans
Length of Stay
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Selection
Practice Guidelines
Referral and Consultation
Retrospective Studies
Sex Factors
Survival Rate
Sweden
Abstract
AIMS: To relate clinical data in a consecutive cohort of patients admitted with heart failure in Sweden to demographic data and the use of diagnostic tests, medical treatment, care process and mortality. METHODS AND RESULTS: Retrospective investigation of all charts concerning patients discharged with primary diagnosis of heart failure in two Swedish hospitals during the second half of 1995 was undertaken. Records from 187 men and 192 women were analyzed, median age was 78 years. During hospital stay 75% of the patients, regardless of gender, were examined with chest radiography. Echocardiography was performed in 59% of all patients, more often in men than in women (68% vs. 55%, P
PubMed ID
10937955 View in PubMed
Less detail

Epidemiology of heart failure in Sweden--a national survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53990
Source
Eur J Heart Fail. 2001 Jan;3(1):97-103
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2001
Author
M. Mejhert
H. Persson
M. Edner
T. Kahan
Author Affiliation
Section of Cardiology, Division of Internal Medicine, Karolinska Institutet Danderyd Hospital, S-18288, Danderyd, Sweden. marit.mejhert@med.ds.sll.se
Source
Eur J Heart Fail. 2001 Jan;3(1):97-103
Date
Jan-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ambulatory Care Facilities - utilization
Delivery of Health Care - organization & administration
Female
Health Expenditures
Heart Failure, Congestive - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Male
Patient Readmission - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Registries
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: In Sweden heart failure is the most frequent discharge diagnosis within internal medicine. The prevalence of heart failure seems to be increasing, mainly due to an ageing population, but also because of improved survival in patients with cardiovascular diseases. AIM: To describe the epidemiology of heart failure in Sweden from a perspective based on demographic and health care data. METHODS: The national registers in Sweden provide detailed information on health care consumption in relation to different diagnoses. Pharmaceutical sales are also registered. There are national epidemiological reports, reports on health care utilization and on health economics concerning heart failure patients. RESULTS: There has been structural changes in the Swedish health care system due to financial restraints in the health care budget. Aiming at reducing hospital costs, the total amount of hospital beds has been cut down markedly during the last decade. The number of heart failure patients and the number of hospital stays have increased during the same period. Hospital stays have become shorter. The number of patients and hospital stays more than double when heart failure as both primary and secondary discharge diagnoses are included. CONCLUSION: The available national registers provide a good opportunity to study epidemiology of heart failure in Sweden. The number of hospital beds has decreased markedly within the last decade due to changes in the Swedish health care system. Nevertheless, there has been an increase in the number of patients discharged with heart failure from the hospitals, suggesting an increase in prevalence.
PubMed ID
11163742 View in PubMed
Less detail

Limited long term effects of a management programme for heart failure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53295
Source
Heart. 2004 Sep;90(9):1010-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2004
Author
M. Mejhert
T. Kahan
H. Persson
M. Edner
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institutet Danderyd Hospital, Section of Cardiology, S-182 88 Stockholm, Sweden. marit.mejhert@med.ds.sll.se
Source
Heart. 2004 Sep;90(9):1010-5
Date
Sep-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Ambulatory Care - methods
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Heart Failure, Congestive - mortality - nursing
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Long-Term Care
Male
Patient Readmission - statistics & numerical data
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Survival Analysis
Survival Rate
Sweden - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of a nurse based outpatient management programme for elderly patients discharged with heart failure from a university hospital. DESIGN: Patients with heart failure (New York Heart Association class II-IV) and left ventricular systolic dysfunction aged 60 years or more were randomly assigned to follow up within the management programme or to conventional follow up, usually in primary care. Of the 208 participants, 58% were men, mean age was 75 years, and mean ejection fraction 34%. All patients were scheduled for three observational study visits at six month intervals. The primary end point was quality of life (QoL) and secondary end points were hospitalisation and mortality. RESULTS: More patients achieved target doses of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors in the intervention group than in the control group (82% v 69%, 88% v 69%, and 88% v 74% of recommended target doses at 6, 12, and 18 months of follow up, respectively, p
Notes
Comment In: Heart. 2004 Sep;90(9):972-415310671
PubMed ID
15310688 View in PubMed
Less detail