Skip header and navigation

Refine By

12 records – page 1 of 2.

Bridging gaps in everyday life - a free-listing approach to explore the variety of activities performed by physiotherapists in specialized palliative care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295174
Source
BMC Palliat Care. 2018 Jan 29; 17(1):20
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-29-2018
Author
U Olsson Möller
K Stigmar
I Beck
M Malmström
B H Rasmussen
Author Affiliation
Institute for Palliative Care, Lund University and Region Skåne, Lund, Sweden. ulrika.olsson_moller@med.lu.se.
Source
BMC Palliat Care. 2018 Jan 29; 17(1):20
Date
Jan-29-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Palliative Care - manpower - methods
Physical Therapists - standards - trends
Qualitative Research
Sweden
Abstract
A growing body of studies indicate benefits of physiotherapy for patients in palliative care, for symptom relief and wellbeing. Though physiotherapists are increasingly acknowledged as important members of palliative care teams, they are still an underutilized source and not fully recognized. The aim of this study was to explore the variety of activities described by physiotherapists in addressing the needs and problems of patients and their families in specialized palliative care settings.
Using a free-listing approach, ten physiotherapists working in eight specialized palliative care settings in Sweden described as precisely and in as much detail as possible different activities in which patients and their families were included (directly or indirectly) during 10 days. The statements were entered into NVivo and analysed using qualitative content analysis. Statements containing more than one activity were categorized per activity.
In total, 264 statements, containing 504 varied activities, were coded into seven categories: Counteracting a declining physical function; Informing, guiding and educating; Observing, assessing and evaluating; Attending to signs and symptoms; Listening, talking with and understanding; Caring for basic needs; and Organizing, planning and coordinating. In practice, however, the activities were intrinsically interwoven. The activities showed how physiotherapists aimed, through care for the body, to address patients' physical, psychological, social and existential needs, counteracting the decline in a patient's physical function and wellbeing. The activities also revealed a great variation, in relation not only to what they did, but also to their holistic and inseparable nature with regard to why, how, when, where, with whom and for whom the activities were carried out, which points towards a well-adopted person-centred palliative care approach.
The study provides hands-on descriptions of how person-centred palliative care is integrated in physiotherapists' everyday activities. Physiotherapists in specialized palliative care help patients and families to bridge the gap between their real and ideal everyday life with the aim to maximize security, autonomy and wellbeing. The concrete examples included can be used in understanding the contribution of physiotherapists to the palliative care team and inform future research interventions and outcomes.
Notes
Cites: PM R. 2012 Feb;4(2):96-108 PMID 22373458
Cites: PLoS Med. 2012 Feb;9(2):e1001173 PMID 22347815
Cites: Int J Palliat Nurs. 2012 Apr;18(4):163-4, 166-70 PMID 22584387
Cites: J Pain Symptom Manage. 1993 Feb;8(2):68-71 PMID 7684058
Cites: Aust J Physiother. 1996;42(4):307-312 PMID 11676663
Cites: Chest. 2006 Apr;129(4):899-904 PMID 16608936
Cites: NeuroRehabilitation. 2015;37(1):53-68 PMID 26409693
Cites: Lancet. 2001 Aug 11;358(9280):483-8 PMID 11513933
Cites: J Palliat Care. 2011 Winter;27(4):296-302 PMID 22372284
Cites: Jpn J Clin Oncol. 2010 Nov;40(11):1068-72 PMID 20558463
Cites: Lancet Neurol. 2008 Apr;7(4):362-7 PMID 18339351
Cites: Psychooncology. 2011 Feb;20(2):173-8 PMID 20333769
Cites: BMJ Support Palliat Care. 2017 Dec;7(4):0 PMID 28232515
Cites: Indian J Palliat Care. 2010 Sep;16(3):138-46 PMID 21218003
Cites: Support Care Cancer. 2009 Aug;17(8):1117-28 PMID 19319577
Cites: J Palliat Med. 2003 Feb;6(1):11-7 PMID 12710571
Cites: Cancer. 2001 Aug 15;92(4 Suppl):1039-48 PMID 11519031
Cites: World J Clin Oncol. 2014 Aug 10;5(3):554-9 PMID 25114869
Cites: Am J Hosp Palliat Care. 2017 Mar;34(2):186-196 PMID 26722007
Cites: Palliat Support Care. 2016 Dec;14 (6):713-724 PMID 27407075
Cites: J Palliat Care. 1988 Sep;4(3):29-32 PMID 3183827
Cites: J Pain Symptom Manage. 2006 May;31(5):421-30 PMID 16716872
Cites: J Altern Complement Med. 2012 May;18(5):480-6 PMID 22540970
Cites: Am J Phys Med Rehabil. 1994 Jun;73(3):199-206 PMID 7515247
Cites: Am J Hosp Palliat Care. 1993 Sep-Oct;10(5):32-5 PMID 8398475
Cites: Prog Palliat Care. 2014 Dec;22(6):319-325 PMID 25414550
Cites: J Palliat Med. 2011 May;14(5):638-48 PMID 21592031
Cites: J Palliat Med. 2012 Jul;15(7):760-7 PMID 22686120
Cites: Support Care Cancer. 2014 May;22(5):1261-8 PMID 24317851
Cites: J Pain Symptom Manage. 2007 Jul;34(1):94-104 PMID 17509812
Cites: Acta Oncol. 2015 May;54(5):618-28 PMID 25752965
Cites: Curr Opin Support Palliat Care. 2010 Sep;4(3):158-62 PMID 20479642
Cites: Palliat Support Care. 2005 Dec;3(4):281-7 PMID 17039983
Cites: J Pain Symptom Manage. 2009 Nov;38(5):641-9 PMID 19713069
Cites: Int J Palliat Nurs. 2013 Jan;19(1):39-45 PMID 23354432
Cites: Nurse Educ Today. 2004 Feb;24(2):105-12 PMID 14769454
Cites: Palliat Support Care. 2017 Apr;15(2):181-189 PMID 27443410
Cites: Int J Cardiol. 2007 Apr 4;116(3):309-14 PMID 17275110
Cites: J Pain Symptom Manage. 2014 Oct;48(4):660-77 PMID 24801658
Cites: J Palliat Care. 2009 Spring;25(1):12-20 PMID 19445338
Cites: Palliat Support Care. 2009 Dec;7(4):459-67 PMID 19939308
PubMed ID
29378566 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cardiovascular risk factors and the neighbourhood environment: a multilevel analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49963
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1999 Oct;28(5):841-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1999
Author
J. Sundquist
M. Malmström
S E Johansson
Author Affiliation
Stanford Center for Research in Disease Prevention, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA, USA. jan.sundquist@smi.mas.lu.se
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1999 Oct;28(5):841-5
Date
Oct-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Comorbidity
Comparative Study
Exercise
Female
Humans
Incidence
Life Style
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Obesity - epidemiology
Population Surveillance
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sampling Studies
Sex Distribution
Smoking - epidemiology
Social Conditions
Socioeconomic Factors
Survival Rate
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: This article examines whether the neighbourhood environment influences intermediate cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, such as obesity (body mass index [BMI]), and lifestyle factors, such as no physical activity and smoking, when adjusted for the individual socioeconomic status (SES). METHODS: The study consists of face-to-face interviews from the Swedish Annual Level of Living Survey (SALLS) matched with the social status of the respondents' residential areas measured by two composite indices, the Care Need Index (CNI) and the Townsend score. The response rate was about 80%. This study was limited to the residents aged 25-74 years and consists of 9240 interviews from the years 1988-1989, when there were extended items in the SALLS about health and lifestyle. The data were analysed using a hierarchical logistic regression model. RESULTS: There was a gradient within every SES group so that respondents with a low (or intermediate or high) educational level exhibited an increasing proportion of daily smokers, physically inactive people and obese individuals with increasing neighbourhood deprivation. The multilevel model showed that respondents living in the most deprived neighbourhoods had an increased risk for being a daily smoker, engaging in no physical activity and being obese when adjusted for the individual SES. CONCLUSIONS: We showed that the area level has an important influence on risk factors for CVD which goes beyond the individual educational attainment. An increased level of living standard, more resources for primary health care and health promotion targeting the community level should be beneficial.
PubMed ID
10597980 View in PubMed
Less detail

Care Need Index, a useful tool for the distribution of primary health care resources.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31001
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2003 May;57(5):347-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2003
Author
K. Sundquist
M. Malmström
S-E Johansson
J. Sundquist
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institutet, Family Medicine, Stockholm, Sweden. Kristina.Marinko@klinvet.ki.se
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2003 May;57(5):347-52
Date
May-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Resources - economics - supply & distribution
Health Services Needs and Demand - economics
Health status
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Primary Health Care - economics
Psychosocial Deprivation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - ethnology
Abstract
STUDY OBJECTIVE: To demonstrate how Care Need Index (CNI), a social deprivation index, may be used to allocate total primary health care resources. DESIGN: Cross sectional survey and register data. The CNI was based on sociodemographic factors: elderly persons living alone, children under age 5, unemployed people, people with low educational status, single parents, high mobility, and foreign born people. The CNI weights were calculated from the ratings of Swedish GPs of the impact of these factors on their workload. The CNI scale was transformed into a positive scale to avoid negative values. CNI weights were calculated for each decile of the study population. The risk of poor self reported health in the CNI deciles was estimated by means of a hierarchical logistic regression in the age range 25-74 (n=27 346). The MigMed database comprising all people living in Sweden was used to calculate the CNI for Stockholm. PARTICIPANTS: The Swedish population and the population in Stockholm County. MAIN RESULTS: The means of the CNI for deciles ranged from 61 (most affluent neighbourhoods) to 140 (most deprived) in Stockholm County. The ratio between the tenth and the first decile was 1.66. There was an approximately 150% increased risk of poor self reported health for people living in the most disadvantaged neighbourhoods (OR=2.50) compared with those living in the most affluent ones (OR=1). CNI ratios for the deciles corresponded approximately to the odds ratios of poor self reported health status. CONCLUSIONS: The CNI can be used to allocate total primary health care resources.
Notes
Comment In: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2004 Jul;58(7):626; author reply 626-715194730
PubMed ID
12700218 View in PubMed
Less detail

A hierarchical analysis of long-term illness and mortality in socially deprived areas.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194142
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2001 Aug;53(3):265-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2001
Author
M. Malmström
S E Johansson
J. Sundquist
Author Affiliation
marianne.malmstrom@klinvet-ki.se
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2001 Aug;53(3):265-75
Date
Aug-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Chronic Disease - economics - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Cultural Deprivation
Health services needs and demand
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Logistic Models
Middle Aged
Mortality
Poverty Areas
Prevalence
Risk factors
Self-Assessment
Small-Area Analysis
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
This article is a multilevel analysis of the effects on self-reported long-term illness and mortality of the socio-economic position of the neighbourhood. Using data from the Swedish Level of Living Survey, neighbourhood social position is measured by a composite Care Need Index, (CNI) together with such indicators of individual socio-economic position as occupation and housing tenure, with adjustment for age, sex, marital status and social network. Data came from 22,236 people aged 25-74, and were collected from 1988 to 1992. The cross-sectional data were analysed using a hierarchical logistic regression model. In a second analysis, each participant was followed from the initial interview until his or her death, or until the termination of data collection (31 December 1996). A neighbourhood's low social position and an individual resident's low socio-economic position (i.e., a manual worker, or person renting a flat) were found to be associated with increased risk of long-term illness. We conclude that a neighbourhood's low socio-economic position, that is, a high score on the CNI, is a risk factor for long-standing illness above and beyond an individual's socio-economic position. The differences in mortality could be explained by the included independent individual variables.
PubMed ID
11439812 View in PubMed
Less detail

Impact of country of birth on hospital admission for women of childbearing age in Sweden: a five year follow up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30662
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2003 Nov;57(11):877-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2003
Author
E. Robertson
M. Malmström
J. Sundquist
S-E Johansson
Author Affiliation
Family Medicine Stockholm, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. eva.robertson@klinvet.ki.se
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2003 Nov;57(11):877-82
Date
Nov-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Emigration and Immigration - statistics & numerical data
Ethnic Groups - statistics & numerical data
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Behavior - ethnology
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Hospitals, Psychiatric - utilization
Humans
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Residence Characteristics - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - ethnology
Women's health
Abstract
STUDY OBJECTIVE: This study examines whether morbidity, defined as the first psychiatric hospital admission and the first somatic hospital admission, differs among subgroups of foreign born and second generation (that is, native born with at least one parent born abroad) women compared with Swedish born women (that is, with both parents native born) after adjusting for sociodemographic factors. DESIGN SETTING: In this follow up study the population consisted of 1 452 944 women, of whom 369 771 have an immigrant background (including second generation immigrants), aged 20-45 years. The population of 31 December 1993 was followed up to 31 December 1998. Differences in risk (hazard ratio) between different groups of immigrant women were estimated, adjusting for age, marital status, number of children, and disposable income. MAIN RESULTS: All four groups of foreign born women had higher age adjusted risks (HRs varied from 1.44 to 1.67) for a first psychiatric hospital admission than Swedish born women. The risk decreased only marginally when the sociodemographic factors were taken into consideration. Additionally, second generation women also had a higher age adjusted risk (HR = 1.42; CI = 1.37 to 1.48) than Swedish born women. The risk decreased only slightly in the main effect model. However, on analysing country of birth and first somatic hospital admissions, only non-European refugee women showed an increased age adjusted risk (HR = 1.26; CI = 1.24 to 1.29), which remained after adjusting for sociodemographic factors. CONCLUSIONS: Foreign born and second generation women of childbearing age had a higher risk than Swedish born women for a first psychiatric hospital admission. However, only non-European refugees were at higher risk of somatic hospital admissions.
PubMed ID
14600113 View in PubMed
Less detail

Indices of need and social deprivation for primary health care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33816
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1998 Jun;26(2):124-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1998
Author
M. Malmström
J. Sundquist
M. Bajekal
S E Johansson
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences Dalby/Lund, University of Lund, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1998 Jun;26(2):124-30
Date
Jun-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Cross-Cultural Comparison
England
Female
Health Services Needs and Demand - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Male
Medical Indigency - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
National Health Programs - statistics & numerical data
Primary Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Psychosocial Deprivation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Small-Area Analysis
Sweden
Workload
Abstract
This study aimed to examine two indices of need, the underprivileged area (UPA) score and a Swedish Care Need Index (CNI, in Swedish vårdbehovsindex) with weightings from British and Swedish GPs respectively, and an index of material deprivation, Townsend score at SAMS (Small Area Market Statistics) level and at municipality level for the whole of Sweden. One third of primary health care physicians from the whole of Sweden received a questionnaire about their workload. CNI, UPA and Townsend scores were calculated using information from the Swedish census of 1990 and the registers of unemployment and migration for 1992. The Swedish GPs weighted some of the variables quite differently from the GPs in the UK. This may be important, especially at the SAMS level. The GPs in both countries considered that older people living alone contributed most to their workload. However, in Sweden the physicians ranked foreign-born people high compared with the English doctors, and in England the GPs ranked children under five years much higher than the doctors in Sweden. The correlation between the scores was high.
PubMed ID
9658512 View in PubMed
Less detail

The influence of social deprivation as measured by the CNI on psychiatric admissions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10612
Source
Scand J Public Health. 1999 Sep;27(3):189-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1999
Author
M. Malmström
J. Sundquist
S E Johansson
L M Johansson
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences Dalby/Lund, University of Lund, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Public Health. 1999 Sep;27(3):189-95
Date
Sep-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcoholism - diagnosis - etiology - therapy
Hospitals, Psychiatric - utilization
Humans
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - etiology - therapy
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data - trends
Poverty - statistics & numerical data
Predictive value of tests
Regression Analysis
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Small-Area Analysis
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to examine the importance of social deprivation for psychiatric admissions and its correlation with two different deprivation scores. Care Need Index (CNI) and Townsend scores were calculated at the small area level in Malm?, a city in southern Sweden. Admission rates for all psychiatric inpatients from Malm? aged 20-79 years, admitted to the psychiatric and alcohol clinics from 1 January 1991 to 31 December 1994, were calculated. The relationship between the CNI and psychiatric admissions was analysed by applying a Poisson regression model. The results are shown as incidence density ratios (IDR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). From the most deprived areas, the first psychiatric admission rate was more than four times higher than in the most affluent areas. The rates of second and third admission were even higher. Admissions to the alcohol clinic were similar to psychiatric admissions, but the most deprived areas had first admission rates about ten times higher than in the most affluent areas. About 27% of first admissions, including patients from both psychiatric and alcohol clinics, had a diagnosis of psychosis, and 43% were substance abusers. There were differences between the patients' diagnoses in different areas. The correlation between the CNI and Townsend scores was very high. The most important finding of this study is the strong correlation between social deprivation, based on different deprivation indices, and first admissions to psychiatric and alcohol clinics.
PubMed ID
10482077 View in PubMed
Less detail

Neighbourhood deprivation and incidence of coronary heart disease: a multilevel study of 2.6 million women and men in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53431
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2004 Jan;58(1):71-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2004
Author
K. Sundquist
M. Malmström
S-E Johansson
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institutet, Family Medicine, Stockholm, Sweden. Kristina.Sundquist@klinvet.ki.se
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2004 Jan;58(1):71-7
Date
Jan-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Coronary Disease - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Surveys
Humans
Incidence
Income
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Poverty
Poverty Areas
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
STUDY OBJECTIVE: To examine whether neighbourhood deprivation predicts incidence rates of coronary heart disease, beyond age and individual income. DESIGN: Follow up study from 31 December 1995 to 31 December 1999. Women and men were analysed separately with respect to incidence rates of coronary heart disease. Multilevel logistic regression was used in the analysis with individual level characteristics (age, individual income) at the first level and level of neighbourhood deprivation at the second level. Neighbourhood deprivation was measured at small area market statistics level by the use of Care Need Index. SETTING: Sweden. PARTICIPANTS: All women and men aged 40-64 in the Swedish population, in total 2.6 million people. MAIN RESULTS: There was a strong relation between level of neighbourhood deprivation and incidence rates of coronary heart disease for both women and men. In the full model, which took account of individual income, the risk of developing coronary heart disease was 87% higher for women and 42% higher for men in the most deprived neighbourhoods than in the most affluent neighbourhoods. For both women and men the variance at neighbourhood level was over twice the standard error, indicating significant differences in coronary heart disease risk between neighbourhoods. CONCLUSIONS: High levels of neighbourhood deprivation independently predict coronary heart disease for both women and men. Both individual and neighbourhood level approaches are important in health care policies.
Notes
Erratum In: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2004 Mar;58(3):259
PubMed ID
14684730 View in PubMed
Less detail

Prescribing patterns for analgesics in relation to underprivileged area (UPA) score, mortality and suicide in 33 municipalities in the province of Skåne, southern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature68390
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 1999 May;34(5):259-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1999
Author
M. Malmström
J. Sundquist
A. Ekedahl
S E Johansson
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, Malmö University Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 1999 May;34(5):259-64
Date
May-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analgesics - therapeutic use
Cross-Sectional Studies
Humans
Middle Aged
Mortality
Physician's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Poverty - statistics & numerical data
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Suicide - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Urban Health - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Although it is well known that analgesics contribute to suicide, there is little knowledge about how much of the mortality and suicide can be explained by socioeconomic deprivation or by sales of analgesics. METHODS: This ecological study analyses the relationships between the sales (defined daily doses per 1000 inhabitants per day) of dextropropoxyphene, dextropropoxyphene combinations, paracetamol, codeine and paracetamol combinations, and other codeine combinations and the Swedish UPA (underprivileged area) score, mortality and suicide rates in 33 municipalities in Sk?ne in 1987 and 1994 for people aged 20-64 years. The association of each of the subgroups of analgesics with all-cause mortality, and with standardised mortality rates for suicide, adjusted for UPA score, was investigated by using weighted (by population size) regression analysis. RESULTS: In 1994 there was a moderate to strong significant correlation between sales of analgesics and UPA scores, mortality and suicide (r = 0.49-0.78). Although UPA score explained 68.9% and 67.4% respectively of the variance between the analgesics and all-cause mortality and suicide, codeine and paracetamol combinations explained a further 10.1% of the variance in suicide. Dextropropoxyphene and codeine and paracetamol combinations explained an additional 3.8% and 2.9% respectively of the variance in mortality. CONCLUSIONS: Local prescription rates for analgesics were associated with mortality and suicide, when adjusted for socioeconomic deprivation defined as UPA score.
PubMed ID
10396168 View in PubMed
Less detail

12 records – page 1 of 2.