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A 6-hour working day--effects on health and well-being.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71230
Source
J Hum Ergol (Tokyo). 2001 Dec;30(1-2):197-202
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2001
Author
T. Akerstedt
B. Olsson
M. Ingre
M. Holmgren
G. Kecklund
Author Affiliation
National Institute for Psychosocial Factors and Health, Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
J Hum Ergol (Tokyo). 2001 Dec;30(1-2):197-202
Date
Dec-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health
Comparative Study
Female
Health Personnel - psychology
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Organizational Innovation
Personnel Staffing and Scheduling - organization & administration
Quality of Life - psychology
Sweden
Work Schedule Tolerance - psychology
Workload - psychology
Abstract
The effect of the total amount of work hours and the benefits of a shortening is frequently debated, but very little data is available. The present study compared a group (N = 41) that obtained a 9 h reduction of the working week (to a 6 h day) with a comparison group (N = 22) that retained normal work hours. Both groups were constituted of mainly female health care and day care nursery personnel. The experimental group retained full pay and extra personnel were employed to compensate for loss of hours. Questionnaire data were obtained before and 1 year after the change. The data were analyzed using a two-factor ANOVA with the interaction term year*group as the main focus. The results showed a significant interaction of year*group for social factors, sleep quality, mental fatigue, and heart/respiratory complaints, and attitude to work hours. In all cases the experimental group improved whereas the control group did not change. It was concluded that shortened work hours have clear social effects and moderate effects on well-being.
PubMed ID
14564882 View in PubMed
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Changes in medication preceding out-of-hospital cardiac arrest where resuscitation was attempted.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260140
Source
J Cardiovasc Pharmacol. 2014 Jun;63(6):497-503
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Christina M Holmgren
Nils J Abdon
Lennart B Bergfeldt
Nils G Edvardsson
Johan D Herlitz
Thomas Karlsson
Leif G Svensson
Bengt H Åstrand
Source
J Cardiovasc Pharmacol. 2014 Jun;63(6):497-503
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation - trends
Drug Prescriptions
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest - chemically induced - diagnosis - epidemiology
Registries
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
To describe recent changes in medication preceding out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) where resuscitation was attempted.
OHCA victims were identified by the Swedish Cardiac Arrest Register and linked by means of their unique 10-digit personal identification numbers to the Prescribed Drug Register. We identified new claimed prescriptions during a 6-month period before the OHCA compared with those claimed in the period 12 to 18 months before. The 7-digit Anatomical Therapeutical Chemical codes of individual drugs were used. The study period was November 2007-January 2011.
OHCA victims with drugs were (1) older than those who did not claim any drugs in any period (70 ± 16 years vs. 54 ± 22 years, P
PubMed ID
24390174 View in PubMed
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Consensus for physiotherapy for shoulder pain.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266902
Source
Int Orthop. 2015 Apr;39(4):715-20
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
Apr-2015
Author
Ingrid Hultenheim Klintberg
Ann M J Cools
Theresa M Holmgren
Ann-Christine Gunnarsson Holzhausen
Kajsa Johansson
Annelies G Maenhout
Jane S Moser
Valentina Spunton
Karen Ginn
Source
Int Orthop. 2015 Apr;39(4):715-20
Date
Apr-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Algorithms
Consensus
Exercise Therapy
Humans
Physical Therapy Modalities
Questionnaires
Range of Motion, Articular
Shoulder Pain - therapy
Sweden
Abstract
Shoulder pain is a common disorder. Despite growing evidence of the importance of physiotherapy, in particular active exercise therapy, little data is available to guide treatment. The aim of this project was to contribute to the development of an internationally accepted assessment and treatment algorithm for patients with shoulder pain.
Nine physiotherapists with expertise in the treatment of shoulder dysfunction met in Sweden 2012 to begin the process of developing a treatment algorithm. A questionnaire was completed prior to the meeting to guide discussions. Virtual conferences were thereafter the platform to reach consensus.
Consensus was achieved on a clinical reasoning algorithm to guide the assessment and treatment for patients presenting with local shoulder pain, without significant passive range of motion deficits and no symptoms or signs of instability. The algorithm emphasises that physiotherapy treatment decisions should be based on physical assessment findings and not structural pathology, that active exercises should be the primary treatment approach, and that regular re-assessment is performed to ensure that all clinical features contributing to the presenting shoulder pain are addressed. Consensus was also achieved on a set of guiding principles for implementing exercise therapy for shoulder pain, namely, a limited number of exercises, performed with appropriate scapulo-humeral coordination and humeral head alignment, in a graduated manner without provoking the presenting shoulder pain.
The assessment and treatment algorithm presented could contribute to a more formal, extensive process aimed at achieving international agreement on an algorithm to guide physiotherapy treatment for shoulder pain.
PubMed ID
25548127 View in PubMed
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[Use of indwelling catheters in long term care is still low].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228698
Source
Lakartidningen. 1990 Jul 25;87(30-31):2424-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-25-1990
Author
H. Frederici
K. Mannerquist
B. Nyström
M. Holmgren
K E Myrbäck
Author Affiliation
Samtliga tre vid kliniskt mikrobiologiska laboratoriet, Huddinge sjukhus, Stockholm.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1990 Jul 25;87(30-31):2424-5
Date
Jul-25-1990
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Catheters, Indwelling - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Long-Term Care
Sweden
PubMed ID
2118973 View in PubMed
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