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Association between perceived health care stigmatization and BMI change.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260818
Source
Obes Facts. 2014;7(3):211-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Lena M Hansson
Finn Rasmussen
Source
Obes Facts. 2014;7(3):211-20
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude of Health Personnel
Body mass index
Body Weight
Female
Health Behavior
Health education
Healthcare Disparities
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - psychology
Obesity, Morbid - psychology
Patient Compliance - psychology
Perception
Physician-Patient Relations
Stereotyping
Sweden
Abstract
This study examined the association between experiences of health care stigmatization and BMI changes in men and women with normal weight and obesity in Sweden.
The participants were drawn from a population-based survey in Sweden (1996-2006), and data on their perceived health care stigmatization were measured in 2008. They were categorized in individuals with normal weight (n = 1,064), moderate obesity (n = 1,273), and severe obesity (n = 291). The main outcome measure was change in BMI.
Individuals with severe obesity experiencing any health care stigmatization showed a BMI increase by 1.5 kg/m2 more than individuals with severe obesity with no such experience. For individuals with moderate obesity, insulting treatment by a physician and avoidance of health care were associated with a relative BMI increase of 0.40 and 0.75 kg/m2, respectively, compared with their counterparts who did not experience stigmatization in these areas. No difference in experience of any form of health care stigmatizing associated BMI change was observed for men and women with normal weight.
In this large, population-based study, perceived health care stigmatization was associated with an increased relative BMI in individuals with severe obesity. For moderate obesity, the evidence of an association was inconclusive.
PubMed ID
24903462 View in PubMed
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Associations Between Swedish Mothers' and 3- and 5-Year-Old Children's Food Intake.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287372
Source
J Nutr Educ Behav. 2016 Sep;48(8):520-529.e1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2016
Author
Lena M Hansson
Berit L Heitmann
Christel Larsson
Per Tynelius
Mikaela Willmer
Finn Rasmussen
Source
J Nutr Educ Behav. 2016 Sep;48(8):520-529.e1
Date
Sep-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Feeding Behavior
Female
Humans
Mother-Child Relations
Mothers - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To investigate associations between mothers' and children's food intake.
Cross-sectional study. Background variables collected through self-reports and from the register of the total population. Mothers recorded their own and their children's food intake in a diary during 2 4-day periods.
Eight counties in mid Sweden.
Three- and 5-year-old children and their mothers were randomly selected from the register of the total population. A total of 2,045 families were invited, 355 of whom accepted. Mothers who accepted were older and to a larger extent born in Sweden. The final sample of mother-child pairs with complete food records was 189.
Mothers' and children's food intake (16 food items).
Spearman rank-order correlation with 95% confidence intervals (2-sided). Moderation was investigated using generalized estimation equations with robust variance.
The strongest correlations between mothers' and children's food intake were found for pizza and oily fish (r = .70-.80). The weakest correlations were found for sugared drinks and fruit and berries (r = .24-.26). Children's age moderated the relationship between mothers' and children's intake of savoury snacks, as did place of residence for pizza intake.
There were substantial correlations between children's and mothers' intake of various foods. Modeling of mothers' intake might be more effective in influencing young children's intake of certain foods, whereas other strategies, such as encouraging parents to influence food availability (eg, gatekeeping), might be more useful for some foods.
PubMed ID
27422494 View in PubMed
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Attitudes towards obesity in the Swedish general population: the role of one's own body size, weight satisfaction, and controllability beliefs about obesity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105993
Source
Body Image. 2014 Jan;11(1):43-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Lena M Hansson
Finn Rasmussen
Author Affiliation
Child and Adolescent Public Health Epidemiology Group, Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Electronic address: lena.hansson@ki.se.
Source
Body Image. 2014 Jan;11(1):43-50
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude to Health
Body Image - psychology
Body Size
Body Weight - physiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - psychology
Personal Satisfaction
Questionnaires
Social Class
Stereotyping
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
This study examined the associations of different socio-demographic and psychological factors with attitudes towards obesity. Individuals with different weight status (N=2436) were drawn from an annual population-based survey in Sweden, and data on attitudes towards obesity (ATOP) and predictor variables were assessed in 2008. The strongest predictor of ATOP was controllability beliefs about obesity (ß=0.83). Thus, greater controllability beliefs about obesity predicted more negative attitudes. Sex and weight satisfaction were also independently associated with ATOP. However, there was no, or only a weak, association between weight satisfaction and ATOP among individuals with normal weight or overweight. And the higher the weight satisfactions of individuals with obesity, the more positive were their attitudes. It seems that stigma-reduction strategies in the general public should address the uncontrollable factors in the aetiology of obesity. However, more research is needed to understand the underlying causes of people's attitudes towards obesity.
PubMed ID
24268600 View in PubMed
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Chloracne caused by ingestion of olive oil contaminated with PCDDs and PCDFs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature37044
Source
Hum Exp Toxicol. 1991 Sep;10(5):311-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1991
Author
A. Rodriguez-Pichardo
F. Camacho
C. Rappe
M. Hansson
A G Smith
J B Greig
Author Affiliation
Departmento de Dermatologia, Universidad de Sevilla, Spain.
Source
Hum Exp Toxicol. 1991 Sep;10(5):311-22
Date
Sep-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acne Vulgaris - chemically induced
Adult
Animals
Benzofurans - poisoning
Chickens
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Food contamination - analysis
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Mice
Plant Oils - analysis
Polymers - poisoning
Spain
Tetrachlorodibenzodioxin - analogs & derivatives - poisoning
Abstract
1. All members of a Spanish family (father, mother and six children) developed chloracne. 2. The causative agent was found to be the family's stock of olive oil, which had become contaminated with polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs), pentachlorophenol, and hexachlorobenzene. 3. The more highly chlorinated PCDDs, in particular octachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, were the predominant congeners in the oil. 4. Three members of the family exhibited either an overt or a sub-clinical disturbance of kidney function. The father also had a chronic respiratory problem. These changes could not be unequivocally attributed to the PCDDs. 5. Experimental toxicity of the oil was limited to the development of an hepatic porphyria in mice. 6. A serum sample, taken 5 years after consumption of the oil ceased, contained high levels of the PCDDs and PCDFs. Extrapolation back to ingested dose was used to validate dosage estimates. 7. The use of toxicity equivalence factors (TEFs) provided estimates of cumulative dosage to produce chloracne as 0.13-0.31 micrograms 2378-TCDD kg-1 (using EPA TEFs) or 6.7-16 micrograms 2378-TCDD kg-1 (using Nordic/NATO TEFs). 8. This is the first incident in which human toxicity is related primarily to ingestion of PCDDs and for which estimates of dosage can be made.
PubMed ID
1683543 View in PubMed
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Cross-sectional associations between maternal self-efficacy and dietary intake and physical activity in four-year-old children of first-time Swedish mothers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301633
Source
Appetite. 2018 06 01; 125:131-138
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
06-01-2018
Author
Jeanett Friis Rohde
Benjamin Bohman
Daniel Berglind
Lena M Hansson
Peder Frederiksen
Erik Lykke Mortensen
Berit Lilienthal Heitmann
Finn Rasmussen
Author Affiliation
Research Unit for Dietary Studies at the Parker Institute, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospital, Copenhagen, Nordre Fasanvej 57, Street 8, Entrance 11, 2000 Frederiksberg, Denmark; Department of Research and Development, Health Science, University College UCC, Carlsbergvej 14, 3400 Hillerød, Denmark. Electronic address: Jeanett.friis.rohde@regionh.dk.
Source
Appetite. 2018 06 01; 125:131-138
Date
06-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Child Behavior
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - psychology
Exercise - psychology
Feeding Behavior - psychology
Female
Health Behavior
Humans
Male
Mother-Child Relations
Mothers - psychology
Self Efficacy
Sweden
Abstract
Healthy dietary and physical activity behaviours are established early in life where children learn by observing their parents. Therefore, parents can act as role models and influence their children toward a healthier lifestyle. Besides a strong association between parental and child health behaviours, parents also influence their children's health behaviours through socio-cognitive processes, where perceived self-efficacy is the central component. The objective was to examine if parental self-efficacy among Swedish mothers was associated with their four-year-old children's dietary and physical activity behaviours.
This cross-sectional study was based on information from control participants that took part in the Swedish primary prevention trial of childhood obesity (PRIMROSE) (n?=?420 mother-child pairs). Linear regression models were used to examine the associations between parental self-efficacy (Parental Self-Efficacy for Promoting Healthy Physical Activity and Dietary Behaviours in Children Scale) and children's dietary intake (parent reported) and levels of physical activity (accelerometer) with adjustments for potential confounders.
Mothers' efficacy beliefs in promoting healthy dietary or physical activity behaviours in their children were associated with a slightly higher consumption of fruit and vegetables among their children (ß: 0.03 [95%CI: 0.01; 0.04] P?
PubMed ID
29408332 View in PubMed
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Exposure to dioxins and dibenzofurans through the consumption of fish.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227005
Source
N Engl J Med. 1991 Jan 3;324(1):8-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-3-1991
Author
B G Svensson
A. Nilsson
M. Hansson
C. Rappe
B. Akesson
S. Skerfving
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
Source
N Engl J Med. 1991 Jan 3;324(1):8-12
Date
Jan-3-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Benzofurans - blood
Dioxins - blood
Fishes
Food Contamination
Food Habits
Humans
Lipids - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Polychlorinated biphenyls - blood
Salmon
Sweden
Abstract
In some regions, including the Baltic Sea, fatty fish such as salmon and herring contain high levels of polychlorinated dibenzodioxins and dibenzofurans. We investigated human exposure to these potentially toxic substances in relation to the consumption of fish from the Baltic Sea.
Plasma levels of 10 different dibenzofurans and 7 dioxins were analyzed in three groups of Swedish men: one group with a high intake of fish (fish eaten almost daily; n = 11), one with a moderate intake of fish (about once per week; n = 9), and one with no consumption of fish (usually because of allergy; n = 9).
Plasma levels of several of the compounds we measured were higher in the men with a high intake of fish than in those who consumed moderate amounts, and the levels were higher in those who ate moderate amounts of fish than in those who ate none. The median amounts of the most toxic dioxin (2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin) were 8.0 pg per gram of plasma lipid (range, 2.0 to 13) in the high-intake group, 2.6 pg per gram (range, 1.2 to 4.2) in the moderate-intake group, and 1.8 pg per gram (range, 1.0 to 2.5) in the nonconsumers (P = 0.001 and 0.02, respectively). There were consistent and statistically significant associations between the reported amount of fish eaten and the plasma levels of several of the dibenzofurans and dioxins.
Contaminated fish such as those from the Baltic Sea are an important source of exposure to polychlorinated dibenzofurans and dibenzodioxins in persons who eat fish regularly. However, the clinical consequences of such exposure remain uncertain.
PubMed ID
1898530 View in PubMed
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Factors affecting reproducibility of dietary reports using food frequency questionnaires.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20290
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2000 Aug;54(8):658-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2000
Author
L M Hansson
M R Galanti
R. Bergström
Author Affiliation
Department of Information Science/Division of Statistics, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. Lisbeth.Hansson@dis.uu.se
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2000 Aug;54(8):658-64
Date
Aug-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Diet Records
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires - standards
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Sex Factors
Statistics, nonparametric
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To study the reproducibility of a food frequency questionnaire used to assess past dietary habits. DESIGN: Repeated retrospective assessment of dietary habits of a population sample. SETTING: Uppsala-Orebro Health Care Region of Sweden. SUBJECTS: One-hundred and four subjects participating as control subjects in a case-control study on thyroid cancer. INTERVENTIONS: Between spring 1993 and spring 1994 a case-control study was conducted in the study area, in order to investigate risk factors for thyroid cancer-diet among others. The study subjects reported their consumption of selected foods with reference 1-5 y before, as well as dietary changes that occurred from adolescence to adult age. One year later 197 control persons were invited to provide a second report of the same food items. Of the invited subjects 104 agreed to participate. RESULTS: The median Spearman rank correlation coefficient between the first and second assessment was 0.58 for food consumption and 0. 56 for nutrients intake. Correlation between the two assessments varied greatly between food items, ranging from -0.03 to 0.83. The correlation was positively related to the frequency and negatively related to the skewness of consumption. The recall of dietary changes from adolescence had a median correlation coefficient of 0. 38 (range 0.19-0.69). There were hints of a higher reproducibility of dietary reports among men and among highly educated subjects (more than 11 y of education), but these differences were statistically significant only for recall of adolescent diet. Reproducibility of nutrients intake was also significantly higher among men than among women, as well as among subjects older than 45 y. CONCLUSIONS: The reproducibility of dietary reports was satisfactory. Among factors affecting reproducibility, frequency and homogeneity of consumption in the source population are presumably the most important. Age, sex and education modify the inter-subject reproducibility of past diet. Based on reproducibility of a semi-quantitative index, the recall of adolescent diet probably has a low validity. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition (2000) 54, 658-664.
PubMed ID
10951515 View in PubMed
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General practitioners' and district nurses' conceptions of the encounter with obese patients in primary health care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136902
Source
BMC Fam Pract. 2011;12:7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Lena M Hansson
Finn Rasmussen
Gerd I Ahlstrom
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
BMC Fam Pract. 2011;12:7
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Female
General Practitioners - psychology
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nurses - psychology
Obesity - psychology
Perception
Physician-Patient Relations
Primary Health Care
Sweden
Weight Gain
Abstract
Primary health care specialists have a key role in the management of obesity. Through understanding how they conceive the encounter with patients with obesity, treatment may be improved. The aim of this study was thus to explore general practitioners' and district nurses' conceptions of encountering patients with obesity in primary health care.
Data were collected through semi-structured interviews, and analysed using a phenomenographic approach. The participants were 10 general practitioners (6 women, 4 men) and 10 district nurses (7 women, 3 men) from 19 primary health care centres within a well-defined area of Sweden.
Five descriptive categories were identified: Adequate primary health care, Promoting lifestyle change, Need for competency, Adherence to new habits and Understanding patient attitudes. All participants, independent of gender and profession, were represented in the descriptive categories. Some profession and gender differences were, however, found in the underlying conceptions. The general staff view was that obesity had to be prioritised. However, there was also the contradictory view that obesity is not a disease and therefore not the responsibility of primary health care. Despite this, staff conceived it as important that patients were met with respect and that individual solutions were provided which could be adhered to step-by-step by the patient. Patient attitudes, such as motivation to change, evasive behaviour, too much trust in care and lack of self-confidence, were, however, conceived as major barriers to a fruitful encounter.
Findings from this study indicate that there is a need for development and organisation of weight management in primary health care. Raising awareness of staff's negative views of patient attitudes is important since it is likely that it affects the patient-staff relationship and staff's treatment efforts. More research is also needed on gender and profession differences in this area.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21333018 View in PubMed
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Immune reconstitution after autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in relation to underlying disease, type of high-dose therapy and infectious complications.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20298
Source
Haematologica. 2000 Aug;85(8):832-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2000
Author
H. Steingrimsdottir
A. Gruber
M. Björkholm
A. Svensson
M. Hansson
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology, Karolinska Hospital, SE-171 76 Stockholm, Sweden. hlif@hotmail.com
Source
Haematologica. 2000 Aug;85(8):832-8
Date
Aug-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols - administration & dosage - adverse effects - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Bone Marrow Diseases - chemically induced - therapy
Breast Neoplasms - blood - drug therapy - therapy
Carmustine - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Cell Lineage
Combined Modality Therapy
Comparative Study
Cytarabine - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Disease Susceptibility
Female
Graft Survival
Hematologic Neoplasms - blood - drug therapy - therapy
Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infection - etiology - immunology
Lymphocyte Count
Lymphocyte Subsets - drug effects
Lymphopenia - blood - etiology
Male
Melphalan - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Middle Aged
Podophyllotoxin - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Transplantation Conditioning - adverse effects
Transplantation, Autologous
Abstract
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Autologous peripheral stem cell transplantation (APSCT) is increasingly used for various hematologic malignancies and solid tumors. The objective of this study was to analyze the immune reconstitution after APSCT and see if there was any correlation with diagnosis, age, type of high-dose therapy, CD34(+) selection of the autograft and double vs single APSCT. DESIGN AND METHODS: Lymphocyte subset recovery was studied in 46 consecutive patients with hematologic malignancies and breast cancer, who underwent APSCT. Eleven patients with multiple myeloma received tandem autografts. Thirty-one patients were given total body irradiation (TBI) as part of the high-dose treatment. Eighteen patients received a CD34(+) selected graft. The percentage and absolute numbers of lymphocyte populations, T-cells (CD2(+), CD3(+)), B-cells (CD19(+)), NK cells (CD56(+ )CD3(-) and CD16(+)CD3(-)) and T-cell subpopulations (CD4(+), CD8(+), CD4(+)CD45RA(+), CD4(+ )CD45RO(+), CD4(+)DR(+), CD8(+ )CD45RO(+), CD8(+)DR(+)), were monitored with flow cytometry during the first year after APSCT. RESULTS: The total B-cell (CD19(+)) and T-cell (CD3(+)) counts were reconstituted to normal levels 2-4 months after APSCT. All patients had a low CD4/CD8 ratio during the observation period, related to both a low number of CD4(+) cells and elevated numbers of CD8(+) cells. The low number of CD4(+) cells was due to a persistently low level of naive CD4(+)CD45RA(+) cells. A high proportion of the CD8+ cells displayed a phenotype compatible with activated T-cells (CD8(+)DR(+)) up to 10 months after autografting. The number of NK cells (CD56(+)3(-) or CD16(+)3(-)) reached normal values within one month post-transplant. No single variable, such as diagnoses, age, TBI as part of the high-dose treatment, tandem autografting or CD34(+) selection of the graft, influenced the immune or hematopoietic reconstitution and no correlation with documented infectious complications was found. INTERPRETATION AND CONCLUSIONS: Despite heterogeneity of diseases, age, initial treatment and high-dose regimens, lymphocyte subset analysis did not reveal any differences in hematopoietic or immune reconstitution. All patients had a low CD4(+)/CD8(+) ratio during at least the first year post-transplant, caused by a persistent increase of CD8(+) lymphocytes and a constant reduction of CD4(+) lymphocytes, making the patients susceptible to infections for a prolonged period of time post-transplant.
PubMed ID
10942930 View in PubMed
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Perceived discrimination among men and women with normal weight and obesity. A population-based study from Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99367
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2010 Aug;38(6):587-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2010
Author
Lena M Hansson
Erik Näslund
Finn Rasmussen
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. lena.hansson@ki.se
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2010 Aug;38(6):587-96
Date
Aug-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body mass index
Body Weight
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Obesity - psychology
Obesity, Morbid - psychology
Perception
Prejudice
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Stereotyping
Sweden
Workplace - psychology
Abstract
AIMS: We examined whether men and women with obesity reported different types of discrimination to a greater extent than those with normal weight, and explored whether these associations were modified by socioeconomic position. Method: National representative sample of men and women, with normal weight (n = 2,000), moderate obesity (n = 2,461) and severe obesity (n = 557). Participants were identified in a yearly population-based survey (1996-2006) and data on perceived discrimination and potential confounding factors were measured in 2008. Logistic regression models tested whether obesity was associated with perceived lifetime, workplace, healthcare and interpersonal discrimination. RESULTS: The overall response rate was 56%. For men, moderate obesity was associated with workplace discrimination, while severely obese women were more likely to report this sort of discrimination than normal weight women. Severely obese individuals were twice as likely to report healthcare discrimination than normal weight individuals. Women, regardless of weight status group, were in turn twice as likely to report healthcare discrimination as men. Women with severe obesity were significantly more likely to report interpersonal discrimination compared with normal weight women. Socioeconomic position modified the association between weight status and healthcare discrimination. Highly educated individuals with moderate and severe obesity were more likely to report healthcare discrimination than their normal weight counterparts, whereas low educated individuals with normal weight, moderate and severe obesity were equally likely to report discrimination. CONCLUSIONS: In this large, population-based study, discrimination was more likely to be reported by obese individuals compared with those of normal weight. The associations, however, varied according to gender and socioeconomic position.
PubMed ID
20529966 View in PubMed
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17 records – page 1 of 2.