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Alcohol during pregnancy and atopic dermatitis in the offspring.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9333
Source
Clin Exp Allergy. 2004 Nov;34(11):1678-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2004
Author
A. Linneberg
J. Petersen
M. Grønbaek
C S Benn
Author Affiliation
Research Centre for Prevention and Health, Glostrup University Hospital, Glostrup, Denmark. alli@glostruphosp.kbhamt.dk
Source
Clin Exp Allergy. 2004 Nov;34(11):1678-83
Date
Nov-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Dermatitis, Atopic - chemically induced - congenital - epidemiology
Epidemiologic Methods
Ethanol - administration & dosage - toxicity
Female
Humans
Infant
Maternal-Fetal Exchange
Pregnancy - psychology
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: There is evidence that antenatal factors play a role in the development of atopic dermatitis (AD). However, little is known about the effects of maternal lifestyle factors during pregnancy on the risk of AD in the offspring. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of alcohol consumption during pregnancy on the incidence of AD in the offspring. METHODS: A total of 24 341 mother-child pairs enrolled in the Danish National Birth Cohort were followed prospectively. Information about alcohol consumption was obtained by interview at 12 and 30 weeks of gestation. Information about symptoms, time of onset, and doctor's diagnosis of AD in the offspring was obtained by interview at 18 months of age. The effect of alcohol consumption during pregnancy on the incidence of AD was analysed by Cox regression allowing for different effects of alcohol before (early infancy) and after 2 months (60 days) of age. RESULTS: Alcohol during pregnancy was associated with a significant and dose-dependent increased risk of AD in early infancy. This effect was mainly seen in high-risk infants (two parents with allergic disease). Thus, the highest risk of AD in early infancy was seen in high-risk infants of mothers who consumed four or more drinks per week at 30 weeks of gestation (adjusted relative risk 4.2, 95% confidence interval 1.7-10.1). There was no effect of alcohol during pregnancy beyond early infancy. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that alcohol during pregnancy increases the risk of early-onset AD in predisposed infants.
PubMed ID
15544590 View in PubMed
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Alcohol intake and the risk of lung cancer: influence of type of alcoholic beverage.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10727
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1999 Mar 1;149(5):463-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1-1999
Author
E. Prescott
M. Grønbaek
U. Becker
T I Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Copenhagen Centre for Prospective Population Studies, Danish Epidemiology Science Centre at the Institute of Preventive Medicine, H:S Kommunehospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1999 Mar 1;149(5):463-70
Date
Mar-1-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Alcoholic Beverages - adverse effects
Beer - adverse effects
Comparative Study
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Denmark - epidemiology
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Female
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Male
Population Surveillance
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk
Sex Factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Wine
Abstract
Alcohol consumption has been associated with an increased risk of lung cancer, but the antioxidants in wine may, in theory, provide protection. This association was studied in 28,160 men and women subjects from three prospective studies conducted in 1964-1992 in Copenhagen, Denmark. After adjustment for age, smoking, and education, a low to moderate alcohol intake (1-20 drinks per week) was not associated with an increased risk of lung cancer. Men who consumed 21-41 and more than 41 drinks per week had relative risks of 1.23 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.88-1.74) and 1.57 (95% CI 1.06-2.33), respectively. The risk of lung cancer differed according to the type of alcohol consumed: After abstainers were excluded, drinkers of 1-13 and more than 13 glasses of wine per week had relative risks of 0.78 (95% CI 0.63-0.97) and 0.44 (95% CI 0.22-0.86), respectively, as compared with nondrinkers of wine (p for trend = 0.002). Corresponding relative risks for beer intake were 1.09 (95% CI 0.83-1.43) and 1.36 (95% CI 1.02-1.82), respectively (p for trend = 0.01); for spirits, they were 1.21 (95% CI 0.97-1.50) and 1.46 (95% CI 0.99-2.14), respectively (p for trend = 0.02). In women, the ability to detect associations with high alcohol intake and type of beverage was limited because of a limited range of alcohol intake. The authors concluded that in men, a high consumption of beer and spirits is associated with an increased risk of lung cancer, whereas wine intake may protect against the development of lung cancer.
PubMed ID
10067906 View in PubMed
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Alcohol intake, beverage preference, and risk of hip fracture in men and women. Copenhagen Centre for Prospective Population Studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10664
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1999 Jun 1;149(11):993-1001
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1-1999
Author
S. Høidrup
M. Grønbaek
A. Gottschau
J B Lauritzen
M. Schroll
Author Affiliation
Danish Epidemiology Science Centre, Institute of Preventive Medicine, Copenhagen University Hospital.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1999 Jun 1;149(11):993-1001
Date
Jun-1-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Alcoholic Beverages - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Hip Fractures - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Osteoporosis - complications - epidemiology - etiology
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk
Sex Factors
Abstract
The authors prospectively studied the association between quantity and type of alcohol intake and risk of hip fracture among 17,868 men and 13,917 women. Analyses were based on pooled data from three population studies conducted in 1964-1992 in Copenhagen, Denmark. During follow-up, 500 first hip fractures were identified in women and 307 in men. A low to moderate weekly alcohol intake (1-27 drinks for men and 1-13 drinks for women) was not associated with hip fracture. Among men, the relative risk of hip fracture gradually increased for those who drank 28 drinks or more per week (relative risk (RR) = 1.75, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.06-2.89 for 28-41 drinks; RR = 5.28, 95% CI 2.60-10.70 for 70 or more drinks) as compared with abstainers. Women who drank 14-27 drinks per week had an age-adjusted relative risk of hip fracture of 1.44 (95% CI 1.03-2.03), but the association weakened after adjustment for confounders (RR = 1.32, 95% CI 0.92-1.87). The risk of hip fracture differed according to the type of alcohol preferred: preferrers of beer had a higher risk of hip fracture (RR = 1.46, 95% CI 1.11-1.91) than preferrers of other types of alcoholic beverages. The corresponding relative risks for preferrers of wine and spirits were 0.77 (95% CI 0.58-1.03) and 0.82 (95% CI 0.58-1.14), respectively. In conclusion, an alcohol intake within the current European drinking limits does not influence the risk of hip fracture, whereas an alcohol intake of more than 27 drinks per week is a major risk factor for men.
PubMed ID
10355374 View in PubMed
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Association between passive smoking in adulthood and phalangeal bone mineral density: results from the KRAM study--the Danish Health Examination Survey 2007-2008.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138515
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2011 Dec;22(12):2989-99
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
T. Holmberg
M. Bech
T. Curtis
K. Juel
M. Grønbæk
K. Brixen
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Øster Farimagsgade 5A, 2, 1353, Copenhagen K, Denmark. tho@niph.dk
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2011 Dec;22(12):2989-99
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bone Density - physiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Finger Phalanges - radiography
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Self Report
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
The study investigates an association between phalangeal bone mineral density (BMD) and self-reported passive smoking using data on 15,038 persons (aged 18-95 years), who underwent a BMD scan in the Danish KRAM study. BMD was significantly lower in persons exposed to long-term passive smoking in their home during adulthood.
Smoking is associated with decreased bone mineral density (BMD) and increased risk of osteoporotic fractures. This study aimed to investigate a possible association between BMD at the phalangeal bones and self-reported passive smoking.
The study included a cohort of 15,544 men and women aged 18-95 years, who underwent a BMD scan in the Danish KRAM study. BMD scans of the middle phalanges of the second, third and fourth digits of the non-dominant hand were performed with a compact radiographic absorptiometry system (Alara MetriScan®). Also, height, weight and body fat percentage were measured and 96.7% (n = 15,038) of the participants answered a self-reported questionnaire with information on passive smoking, other lifestyle factors, education, etc. The association between passive smoking and BMD was examined using multiple linear regression analysis.
A total of 39.1% (n = 5,829) of the participants had been exposed to passive smoking in adulthood at home. BMD was significantly lower in subjects exposed to passive smoking, 0.343 vs. 0.331 g/cm(2); p
PubMed ID
21170642 View in PubMed
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Beer, wine, spirits and subjective health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10529
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 1999 Nov;53(11):721-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1999
Author
M. Grønbaek
E L Mortensen
K. Mygind
A T Andersen
U. Becker
C. Gluud
T I Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Danish Epidemiology Science Centre, Copenhagen University Hospital, Denmark.
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 1999 Nov;53(11):721-4
Date
Nov-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol Drinking - trends
Alcoholic Beverages
Beer
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Female
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Wine
Abstract
STUDY OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between intake of different types of alcoholic beverages and self reported subjective health. DESIGN: Cross sectional health survey with assessment of intake of beer, wine and spirits (at last non-weekend day), smoking habits, social networks, physical activity, body mass index, educational level, presence of chronic disease, and self reported health. SETTING: WHO Copenhagen Healthy City Survey, Denmark. PARTICIPANTS: 4113 men and 7926 women aged 18 to 100 years. MAIN RESULTS: Of the 12,039 subjects, 8680 reported their health as optimal, and 3359 reported a suboptimal health. After controlling for the covariates, the relation between total alcohol intake and the proportion reporting suboptimal health was J shaped. Heavy drinkers of any of the three types of alcoholic beverages had a higher prevalence of suboptimal health than non-drinkers. However, only light (1-2 glasses of wine yesterday) and moderate (3-5) wine drinkers had significantly lower odds ratios for suboptimal health--0.72 (95% confidence limits; 0.56 to 0.92) and 0.65 (0.49 to 0.87), respectively--when compared with non-wine drinkers. Moderate beer or spirits drinkers did not differ significantly from non-drinkers of these beverages with regard to prevalence of suboptimal health. Consistently, beer preference drinkers had an odds ratio of 1.50 (1.25 to 1.80) for suboptimal health compared with wine preference drinkers. CONCLUSIONS: A light to moderate wine intake is related to good self perceived health, whereas this is not the case for beer and spirits. The causal relations creating this association are unknown and should be considered when interpreting the relation between different types of alcoholic beverages and subsequent morbidity and mortality.
PubMed ID
10656102 View in PubMed
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Carbohydrate-deficient transferrin--a valid marker of alcoholism in population studies? Results from the Copenhagen City Heart Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11424
Source
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 1995 Apr;19(2):457-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1995
Author
M. Grønbaek
J H Henriksen
U. Becker
Author Affiliation
Institute of Preventive Medicine, Copenhagen Health Services, Copenhagen, Municipal Hospital, Denmark.
Source
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 1995 Apr;19(2):457-61
Date
Apr-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcoholism - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology
Biological Markers - blood
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Mass Screening
Predictive value of tests
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sampling Studies
Transferrin - analogs & derivatives - metabolism
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Carbohydrate-deficient transferrin (CDT) was analyzed by a modified radioimmunoassay test in a random population sample of 400 individuals, and results were compared with reported alcohol intake derived from a structured questionnaire. Among the 180 men, the test was found to be acceptable with respect to detecting harmful alcohol intake (> 35 beverages/week) and alcohol intake above the recommended level (21 beverages/week), although the positive predictive values were low. Among the 220 women, the test was invalid with low predictive values. CDT was compared with other known markers of high alcohol intake, and it was observed that CDT had higher sensitivity and specificity than AST and short Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test (sMAST) in men, whereas the positive and negative predictive values were low in all tests. A combination of CDT and AST proved to be a better marker of both harmful alcohol intake and alcohol intake above the recommended level than the other markers. Neither CDT, AST, CDT/AST, nor sMAST proved to be useful as markers of alcohol intake in women. There were no differences between the values for pre- and postmenopausal women. These results from a population survey indicate that CDT is a marker of alcohol intake among men, although not ideal, but CDT cannot be used in the screening of harmful alcohol intake in women.
PubMed ID
7625582 View in PubMed
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Cardiorespiratory fitness in 16 025 adults aged 18-91 years and associations with physical activity and sitting time.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283327
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2016 Dec;26(12):1435-1443
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2016
Author
L. Eriksen
M. Grønbaek
J W Helge
J S Tolstrup
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2016 Dec;26(12):1435-1443
Date
Dec-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cardiorespiratory fitness
Denmark
Exercise
Exercise Test
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Leisure Activities
Male
Middle Aged
Oxygen consumption
Sedentary lifestyle
Sex Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Our aim was to provide up-to-date cardiorespiratory fitness reference data for adults of all ages and to investigate associations between cardiores-piratory fitness and leisure time physical activity as well as sitting time. In the Danish Health Examination Survey 2007-2008, cardiorespiratory fitness was estimated in 16 025 individuals aged 18-91 years from validated cycle ergometer exercise tests. Level of leisure time physical activity (sedentary, light, moderate, and vigorous) and daily sitting time in hours was obtained from a self-administered questionnaire. Men had 20-33% higher cardiorespiratory fitness than women, depending on age, and cardiorespiratory fitness decreased by 0.26 and 0.23 mL/min/kg per year in men and women, respectively. Cardiorespiratory fitness was higher among participants who reported a high level of physical activity in leisure time compared with participants who were sedentary. Among sedentary or lightly physically active participants, inverse associations between total daily sitting time and cardiorespiratory fitness were found, while there was no association between sitting time and cardiorespiratory fitness among moderately or vigorously physically active participants. These data on cardiorespiratory fitness can serve as useful reference material. Although reluctant to conclude on causality, sitting time might impact cardiorespiratory fitness among individuals with low levels of leisure time physical activity.
PubMed ID
26681406 View in PubMed
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Combined influence of leisure-time physical activity and hip circumference on all-cause mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116365
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2013 Jan;21(1):E78-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
J N Østergaard
M. Grønbaek
L. Angquist
P. Schnohr
T I A Sørensen
B L Heitmann
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Center for Cardiovascular Research, Aalborg Hospital, Aarhus University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark. jnos@soci.au.dk
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2013 Jan;21(1):E78-85
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Body Size
Cause of Death
Denmark
Exercise - physiology
Female
Hip
Humans
Leisure Activities
Male
Middle Aged
Muscle, Skeletal - pathology
Muscular Atrophy - mortality
Proportional Hazards Models
Sex Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Hip circumference has been shown to be inversely associated with mortality. Muscle atrophy in the gluteofemoral region may be a possible explanation and thus physical activity is likely to play an important role.
To estimate the combined effects of hip circumference and physical activity on mortality.
From the Copenhagen City Heart Study, 3,358 men and 4,350 women aged 21 to 93 years without pre-existing diagnosis of diabetes, stroke, ischemic heart disease, or cancer in 1991-1994 and with complete information on the variables of interest were included in the analyses. The participants were followed to 2009 in the Danish Civil Registration System, with 1.3% loss to follow-up and 2,513 deaths. Hazard ratios (HR) were estimated for combinations of physical activity and hip circumference.
Hip circumference was inversely associated with mortality irrespective of being physically active or not. However, being physically active seemed to counterbalance some of the adverse health effects of a small hip circumference; when comparing inactive to active, the excess mortality at the 25th percentile of hip circumference is 40% in men (HR = 1.40, 95% CI: 1.14-1.72) and 33% in women (HR = 1.33, CI: 1.10-1.62). These associations were observed after adjustment for waist circumference and weight change in the 6 months before the examination.
Less effects of physical activity were found in individuals with greater hip circumferences. A small hip circumference appears hazardous to survival. However, being physically active may counterbalance some of the hazardous effects of a small hip circumference.
PubMed ID
23404691 View in PubMed
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A comparison of the alcohol-attributable mortality in four European countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9645
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2003;18(7):643-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
A. Britton
E. Nolte
I R White
M. Grønbaek
J. Powles
F. Cavallo
K. McPherson
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, UK. a.britton@public-health.ucl.ac.uk
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2003;18(7):643-51
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - mortality - prevention & control
Alcohol-Related Disorders - complications - mortality - prevention & control
Cause of Death
Comparative Study
Denmark - epidemiology
England - epidemiology
Female
Germany - epidemiology
Humans
Italy - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Vital statistics
Wales - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Deaths due to alcohol consumption are an important component of all-cause mortality, particularly premature mortality. However, there are considerable regional variations, the reasons for which are unclear. METHODS: Estimates were made as reliably as possibly using vital statistics and best estimates of risk of the alcohol-attributable mortality, by age, sex and cause for four European countries (England and Wales, Germany, Denmark and Italy). Twenty-seven alcohol-related conditions were considered including the possible cardio-protective effects of alcohol. RESULTS: It was estimated that there are approximately 2% fewer deaths annually in England and Wales than would be expected in a non-drinking population and 0.3% fewer deaths among East German females. In West Germany, Denmark, Italy and among East German males there are more deaths caused by alcohol than are prevented (between 0.7 and 2.6% of all deaths). The highest age-specific proportion of alcohol-attributable deaths is found in East Germany where around 30% of deaths among males aged 25-44 years are due to drinking. Among young men in all four countries the largest contributor to alcohol-related deaths is road traffic accidents involving alcohol. CONCLUSIONS: Possible explanations for the variation in alcohol-attributable deaths between countries include different underlying heart disease rates, different patterns of alcohol consumption and beverage preferences, and different use of mortality classification. Differences in the reported alcohol consumption levels explain little of the variation in alcohol-attributable deaths. Estimating alcohol-attributable mortality by age and sex across countries may be a useful indicator for developing alcohol strategies and exploring ways of preventing premature mortality.
Notes
Comment In: Eur J Epidemiol. 2003;18(7):603-512952132
PubMed ID
12952137 View in PubMed
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Does the association between smoking status and selected healthy foods depend on gender? A population-based study of 54 417 middle-aged Danes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19306
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2002 Jan;56(1):57-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2002
Author
M. Osler
A. Tjønneland
M. Suntum
B L Thomsen
C. Stripp
M. Grønbaek
K. Overvad
Author Affiliation
Institute of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2002 Jan;56(1):57-63
Date
Jan-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body mass index
Denmark - epidemiology
Diet Surveys
Dietary Fats, Unsaturated - analysis
Educational Status
Female
Food Habits - drug effects
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Smoking serves different functions for men and women. Thus, we wanted to investigate the association between smoking behaviour and intakes of selected healthy foods in men and women with special focus on differences and similarities between the two genders. DESIGN: In 1993-1997, a random sample of 80 996 men and 79 729 women aged 50-64 y was invited to participate in the study 'Diet, Cancer and Health'. In all, 27 179 men and 29 876 women attended a health examination and completed a 192-item food-frequency questionnaire (FFQ). The association between smoking status and low, median and high intakes of selected foods was examined among 25 821 men and 28 596 women. SETTING: The greater Copenhagen and Aarhus area, Denmark. RESULTS: For both men and women, smoking status group was associated with diet, such that increasing level of smoking status ranging from never smokers over ex-smokers to currently heavy smokers was associated with a lower intake of the healthy foods: fresh fruit, cooked vegetables, raw vegetables/salad, and olive oil. For wine, increasing level of smoking status category was associated with a higher fraction of abstainers and heavy drinkers. The difference between the extreme smoking status categories was larger than the difference between men and women within smoking status categories such that never smoking men in general had a higher intake of healthy foods than heavy smoking women. Correction for age, educational level, and body mass index (BMI) did not affect the results. CONCLUSION: In this middle-aged population, intake of healthy foods were associated with smoking behaviour with a dose-response type of relationship. The overall pattern was similar for men and women.
PubMed ID
11840181 View in PubMed
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35 records – page 1 of 4.