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16 records – page 1 of 2.

[A national registry on diabetes--cooperation is necessary for quality]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature48295
Source
Lakartidningen. 1996 Apr 3;93(14):1318
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-3-1996

Associations with retinopathy in type 2 diabetes: a population-based study in a Swedish rural area.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature48427
Source
Diabet Med. 1994 Nov;11(9):843-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1994
Author
M. Falkenberg
K. Finnström
Author Affiliation
Community Health Care Centre, Kisa, Sweden.
Source
Diabet Med. 1994 Nov;11(9):843-9
Date
Nov-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Albuminuria - complications
Antihypertensive Agents - adverse effects
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - complications - diagnosis - metabolism
Diabetic Retinopathy - diagnosis - epidemiology
Eye Diseases - diagnosis
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Rural Population
Smoking - adverse effects
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
This population-based study was carried out in a rural area in Sweden. The impact of duration of diabetes, metabolic control, albuminuria, and mode of detection (screening or presence of overt symptoms at the time of diagnosis) on retinopathy in patients with type 2 diabetes aged under 70 years was investigated at a primary health care centre. Ninety-nine percent of all known persons with Type 2 diabetes were under care at the centre. The fundi were examined in all but one of those under 70 years, and a 100% attendance rate was noted with regard to other variables such as albuminuria, glycated haemoglobin, and blood lipids. A team approach (general practitioner, nurse specialist, dietitian, and chiropodist) with patient education as an integral part of the treatment has been practised for the past 15 years. Retinopathy was associated with duration of disease, glycaemic control, systolic blood pressure, detection by overt symptoms, and albuminuria. The risk of retinopathy was not associated with smoking or treatment category. The prevalence of retinopathy was 26.5% in the whole population, and 18.8% among the patients who had been treated for their diabetes at the centre from the time of diagnosis. The importance of an appropriate organization in primary health care for early case finding, near-normal glycaemia, team approach, and structured collaboration with a department of ophthalmology is emphasized in order to realize the aims of the St Vincent declaration to reduce eye complications due to Type 2 diabetes.
PubMed ID
7705020 View in PubMed
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[Check your waist circumference! Overweight, obesity and abdominal obesity risk factors of type 2 diabetes]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47672
Source
Lakartidningen. 2001 Aug 22;98(34):3520-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-22-2001
Author
M. Falkenberg
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Health Sciences, Hälsouniversitetet, SE-581 85 Linkoping. melcher@melcher.nu
Source
Lakartidningen. 2001 Aug 22;98(34):3520-2
Date
Aug-22-2001
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdomen - anatomy & histology
Adult
Aged
Anthropometry
Body mass index
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - etiology - prevention & control
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - complications - psychology
Primary Prevention
Risk factors
Rural Population
Abstract
The object with the present study was to present prevalence data in a rural area in Sweden regarding overweight, obesity and abdominal obesity presented by waist circumference. The study was population-based in primary health care. The target group was aged 20 years or more. A total of 91% (n = 6,686) participated. 45% of men and 32% of women were overweight (BMI 25-29.9 kg/m2), 12% of men and 17% of women were obese (BMI > or = 30 kg/m2). The programme found among men 25.8% with a waist circumference 94-101.9 cm and 18.0% > or = 102 cm and among women 22.7% with 80.0-87.9 cm and 27.2% > or = 88 cm. The relative risk for type 2 diabetes increased with waist circumference. Making health care personnel and patients aware of overweight, obesity and abdominal obesity and the risk of associated diseases and encourage a healthy life style is urgent in time of an obesity epidemic.
PubMed ID
11571793 View in PubMed
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Diabetes care in a rural primary health care district where patient education is given high priority. Metabolic evaluation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature48693
Source
Fam Pract. 1990 Dec;7(4):270-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1990
Author
M. Falkenberg
Author Affiliation
Community Health Care Centre, Kisa, Sweden.
Source
Fam Pract. 1990 Dec;7(4):270-2
Date
Dec-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Diabetes Mellitus - diet therapy - metabolism - therapy
Female
Health Priorities
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - analysis
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Education
Primary Health Care
Rural Health
Sweden
Abstract
The present population-based study comprises 84% of all known diabetics cared for at a rural primary health care centre. Patient education has been given high priority as an integral part of the treatment provided by a specially trained nurse and dietician under the supervision of the general practitioners. Most of the patients were under good metabolic control, as reflected by HbA1 (diet-treated, n = 119, 7.3 +/- 1.3%; oral agent-treated, n = 127, 7.8% +/- 1.3%; insulin-treated, n = 110, 8.0 +/- 1.3%; reference range 5.3-7.3%). Obvious reasons for any high HbA1 values were found.
PubMed ID
2289638 View in PubMed
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Editor's choice. A randomized controlled trial of the fascia suture technique compared with a suture-mediated closure device for femoral arterial closure after endovascular aortic repair.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261533
Source
Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg. 2015 Feb;49(2):166-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2015
Author
T. Larzon
H. Roos
G. Gruber
O. Henrikson
A. Magnuson
M. Falkenberg
L. Lönn
L. Norgren
Source
Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg. 2015 Feb;49(2):166-73
Date
Feb-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal - surgery
Catheterization, Peripheral - adverse effects - economics
Clinical Competence
Cost Savings
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Endovascular Procedures - adverse effects - economics
Equipment Design
Fascia - surgery
Female
Femoral Artery - surgery
Health Care Costs
Humans
Male
Operative Time
Punctures
Suture Techniques - economics - instrumentation
Sweden
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Vascular Closure Devices - economics
Abstract
The aim was to investigate whether the fascia suture technique (FST) can reduce access closure time and procedural costs compared with the Prostar technique (Prostar) in patients undergoing endovascular aortic repair and to evaluate the short- and mid-term outcomes of both techniques.
In this two center trial, 100 patients were randomized to access closure by either FST or Prostar between June 2006 and December 2009. The primary endpoint was access closure time. Secondary outcome measures included access related costs and evaluation of the short- and mid-term complications. Evaluation was performed peri- and post-operatively, at discharge, at 30 days and at 6 months follow up.
The median access closure time was 12.4 minutes for FST and 19.9 minutes for Prostar (p 
Notes
Comment In: Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg. 2015 Feb;49(2):17425441840
PubMed ID
25549577 View in PubMed
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Endovascular technique for arterial shunting to prevent intraoperative ischemia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103004
Source
Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg. 2014 Aug;48(2):126-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
K. Österberg
M. Falkenberg
T. Resch
Author Affiliation
Department of Vascular Surgery and Institute of Medicine, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital and Academy, Blå Stråket 5, S-413 45 Gothenburg, Sweden. Electronic address: klas.osterberg@vgregion.se.
Source
Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg. 2014 Aug;48(2):126-30
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Aorta - physiopathology - surgery
Endovascular Procedures
Humans
Ischemia - etiology - physiopathology - prevention & control
Lower Extremity - blood supply
Perfusion - methods
Regional Blood Flow
Retrospective Studies
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Vascular Surgical Procedures - adverse effects
Abstract
The use of an intraoperative shunt is an established technique used to reduce the ischemic time after acute arterial obstruction or in the prevention of hypoperfusion due to complex open vascular or endovascular operative procedures. To date, described methods of temporary extremity blood perfusion have required open surgical techniques.
An endovascular shunt (ES) was formed by connecting two introducer sheaths to each other, one positioned proximal and one distal to an arterial obstruction. The ES method was used in patients considered to be at high risk for prolonged lower limb ischemia in conjunction with a vascular procedure and where shunt creation by open surgical technique was not considered to be a practical alternative. The flow capacity of the ES was defined in a desktop model.
The ES method was used clinically in 15 vascular interventions including eight complex endovascular aortic procedures, three open aortic operations, and four procedures for acute limb ischemia. The shunts were functional in all patients and there were no shunt occlusions. Postoperatively, there were no evident clinical reperfusion injuries. Flow analysis revealed that the ES had a flow capacity of 73% flow capacity compared to a Pruitt-Inahara shunt.
A new method of temporary blood shunting in connection to vascular procedures has been demonstrated.
PubMed ID
24909978 View in PubMed
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[Foot ulcers in patients with diabetes. Preventive measures reduce the number of amputations].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219822
Source
Lakartidningen. 1993 Nov 24;90(47):4221-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-24-1993
Author
M. Falkenberg
J. Apelqvist
U. Rosenqvist
F. Lithner
Author Affiliation
Vårdcentralen, Kisa.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1993 Nov 24;90(47):4221-4
Date
Nov-24-1993
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Amputation - statistics & numerical data
Diabetic Foot - economics - prevention & control - surgery
Europe - epidemiology
Humans
Risk factors
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Reports of preventive management resulting in reduction, by 50 percent or more, of the incidence of major amputation due to foot ulceration in diabetics have now been published from seven different localities, five in Europe (Umeå, Kisa, Lund, London and Geneva) and two in the USA (Tucson and Louisville). The methods used to achieve the reduction are remarkably similar, being based on systematic check-ups for incipient foot ulceration and its putative risk factors. In all three Swedish reports, the work has entailed close liaison with community health centres in the respective areas, which is considered to be of the utmost importance in reaching all diabetics at risk of foot ulcers. Another important prerequisite is a specialised foot clinic for diabetic patients in each area, where the skills of a chiropodist, a physician specialised in diabetes, an orthopaedic surgeon and an orthopaedic shoemaker are available.
PubMed ID
8255135 View in PubMed
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[Improved care of patients with diabetes in primary health care decreases the number of amputations]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature48745
Source
Lakartidningen. 1989 Oct 11;86(41):3450-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-11-1989

Metabolic control and amputations among diabetics in primary health care--a population-based intensified programme governed by patient education.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature48725
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 1990 Mar;8(1):25-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1990
Author
M. Falkenberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Preventive and Social Medicine, University of Linköping, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 1990 Mar;8(1):25-9
Date
Mar-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Amputation
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - metabolism - surgery
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - metabolism - surgery
Humans
Middle Aged
Patient Education
Primary Health Care - methods - standards
Quality of Health Care
Rural Population
Sweden
Abstract
The clinical set-up in primary health care, with a specially trained nurse, a dietician, and a chiropodist under the supervision of general practitioners and giving patient education high priority, is evaluated after ten years in practice. Of the 391 patients cared for, 352 had non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, treated as follows; diet 128, oral agents 132, insulin 91. Forty patients had insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. The metabolic control was good in the great majority of the patients. The mean HbA1C value for the whole diabetic population taken care of at the centre was 5.83% +/- 1.16%, -reference range 3.2-6.0%. The metabolic control is presented according to the European NIDDM Policy Group. On comparing two five-year periods the number of amputations decreased from 18 to 4 (p less than 0.01).
PubMed ID
2356370 View in PubMed
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16 records – page 1 of 2.