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Comparison of telephone versus face-to-face interviews in the assessment of dietary intake by the 24-hour recall EPIC SOFT programme--the Norwegian calibration study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9843
Source
IARC Sci Publ. 2002;156:17-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002

Comparison of telephone vs face-to-face interviews in the assessment of dietary intake by the 24 h recall EPIC SOFT program--the Norwegian calibration study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18665
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2003 Jan;57(1):107-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2003
Author
M. Brustad
G. Skeie
T. Braaten
N. Slimani
E. Lund
Author Affiliation
Institute of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, Norway. magritt.brustad@ism.uit.no
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2003 Jan;57(1):107-13
Date
Jan-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Calibration
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Diet Surveys
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Dietary Proteins - administration & dosage
Effect Modifiers (Epidemiology)
Energy intake
Female
Humans
Interviews - methods - standards
Mental Recall
Middle Aged
Norway
Nutrition Assessment
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To compare food group intakes in grams, total energy and energy contribution from macronutrients between two random samples of women, using a standardized computer program (EPIC SOFT) with either a face-to-face or a telephone 24 h recall interview design. METHODS: Two groups of Norwegian women living in Tromsø were drawn at random from the Norwegian Women and Cancer Study (NOWAC) cohort. The EPIC SOFT computer program was used to conduct single 24 h dietary recalls either by telephone or face to face. For the latter, 160 women were invited, of whom 111 responded positively (crude response rate=69.4%) and 102 were interviewed. For the telephone option, 180 were invited to participate, 109 responded positively (crude response rate=60.6%) and 103 were interviewed. RESULTS: The two groups of women were similar with respect to age, body mass index, basal metabolic rate, smoking, education, physical activity and special diet status. No statistically significant difference in dietary intake was found between interviews conducted by telephone and face-to-face, except for 'egg and egg products' (P
PubMed ID
12548305 View in PubMed
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Diversity of dietary patterns observed in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18549
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2002 Dec;5(6B):1311-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
N. Slimani
M. Fahey
A A Welch
E. Wirfält
C. Stripp
E. Bergström
J. Linseisen
M B Schulze
C. Bamia
Y. Chloptsios
F. Veglia
S. Panico
H B Bueno-de-Mesquita
M C Ocké
M. Brustad
E. Lund
C A González
A. Barcos
G. Berglund
A. Winkvist
A. Mulligan
P. Appleby
K. Overvad
A. Tjønneland
F. Clavel-Chapelon
E. Kesse
P. Ferrari
W A Van Staveren
E. Riboli
Author Affiliation
Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, International Agency for Research on Cancer, 150 cours Albert-Thomas, 69372 Lyon Cedex 08, France. Slimani@iarc.fr
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2002 Dec;5(6B):1311-28
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cultural Diversity
Diet
Diet Surveys
Europe
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Male
Mental Recall
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance - methods
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To describe the diversity in dietary patterns existing across centres/regions participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). DESIGN AND SETTING: Single 24-hour dietary recall measurements were obtained by means of standardised face-to-face interviews using the EPIC-SOFT software. These have been used to present a graphic multi-dimensional comparison of the adjusted mean consumption of 22 food groups. SUBJECTS: In total, 35 955 men and women, aged 35-74 years, participating in the EPIC nested calibration study. RESULTS: Although wide differences were observed across centres, the countries participating in EPIC are characterised by specific dietary patterns. Overall, Italy and Greece have a dietary pattern characterised by plant foods (except potatoes) and a lower consumption of animal and processed foods, compared with the other EPIC countries. France and particularly Spain have more heterogeneous dietary patterns, with a relatively high consumption of both plant foods and animal products. Apart from characteristics specific to vegetarian groups, the UK 'health-conscious' group shares with the UK general population a relatively high consumption of tea, sauces, cakes, soft drinks (women), margarine and butter. In contrast, the diet in the Nordic countries, The Netherlands, Germany and the UK general population is relatively high in potatoes and animal, processed and sweetened/refined foods, with proportions varying across countries/centres. In these countries, consumption of vegetables and fruit is similar to, or below, the overall EPIC means, and is low for legumes and vegetable oils. Overall, dietary patterns were similar for men and women, although there were large gender differences for certain food groups. CONCLUSIONS: There are considerable differences in food group consumption and dietary patterns among the EPIC study populations. This large heterogeneity should be an advantage when investigating the relationship between diet and cancer and formulating new aetiological hypotheses related to dietary patterns and disease.
PubMed ID
12639235 View in PubMed
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Levels of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in a coastal northern Norwegian population with high fish-liver intake.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76215
Source
J Environ Monit. 2006 May;8(5):552-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2006
Author
T M Sandanger
M. Brustad
C D Sandau
E. Lund
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Institute for Air Research, Polar Environmental Centre, Tromsø, Norway. torkjel.sandanger@nilu.no.
Source
J Environ Monit. 2006 May;8(5):552-7
Date
May-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Recent research has again raised the issue regarding the potential health effects of long term exposure to persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in the context of a risk-benefit analysis. There remains clear evidence of the beneficial effects of fish consumption on public health and in particular fatty fish with its essential fatty acids. In addition to providing fatty acids, fish fat constitutes an essential source to vitamin D for the northern Norwegian population. Norwegian Food Control Authorities have recommended that children and women of childbearing age should not consume fish liver due to the risk associated with high intake of POPs. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of fish liver intake on the levels of PCBs and chlorinated pesticides in a rural coastal community (n = 31) in northern Norway, applying a cross-sectional design. The geometric mean plasma levels of sum of PCBs (14 congeners) and p,p'-DDE was found to be 558 microg kg(-1) lipids and 179 microg kg(-1) lipids, respectively. These levels were not significantly affected by the reported intake of fish liver, when age and gender were considered. Age in particular, but also gender were significant predictors for most compounds. When merging the dataset with an urban population with considerable lower intake of fish liver, the intake of cod liver still did not significantly affect the levels of PCBs and p,p'-DDE when adjusted for age and gender. Age and gender remain the strongest predictors of plasma levels of POPs in this study whereas fish liver intake was not significantly associated with the POPs.
PubMed ID
16688357 View in PubMed
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Patterns of alcohol consumption in 10 European countries participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186257
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2002 Dec;5(6B):1287-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
S. Sieri
A. Agudo
E. Kesse
K. Klipstein-Grobusch
B. San-José
A A Welch
V. Krogh
R. Luben
N. Allen
K. Overvad
A. Tjønneland
F. Clavel-Chapelon
A. Thiébaut
A B Miller
H. Boeing
M. Kolyva
C. Saieva
E. Celentano
M C Ocké
P H M Peeters
M. Brustad
M. Kumle
M. Dorronsoro
A. Fernandez Feito
I. Mattisson
L. Weinehall
E. Riboli
N. Slimani
Author Affiliation
Epidemiology Unit, National Cancer Institute, Via Venezian 1, 20133 Milan, Italy. sieris@libero.it
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2002 Dec;5(6B):1287-96
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Beer - statistics & numerical data
Diet Surveys
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Recall
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance - methods
Prospective Studies
Sex Distribution
Wine - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The aim of this study was to compare the quantities of alcohol and types of alcoholic beverages consumed, and the timing of consumption, in centres participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). These centres, in 10 European countries, are characterised by widely differing drinking habits and frequencies of alcohol-related diseases.
We collected a single standardised 24-hour dietary recall per subject from a random sample of the EPIC cohort (36 900 persons initially and 35 955 after exclusion of subjects under 35 and over 74 years of age). This provided detailed information on the distribution of alcohol consumption during the day in relation to main meals, and was used to determine weekly consumption patterns. The crude and adjusted (by age, day of week and season) means of total ethanol consumption and consumption according to type of beverage were stratified by centre and sex.
Sex was a strong determinant of drinking patterns in all 10 countries. The highest total alcohol consumption was observed in the Spanish centres (San Sebastian, 41.4 g day-1) for men and in Danish centres (Copenhagen, 20.9 g day-1) for women. The lowest total alcohol intake was in the Swedish centres (Umeå, 10.2 g day-1) in men and in Greek women (3.4 g day-1). Among men, the main contributor to total alcohol intake was wine in Mediterranean countries and beer in the Dutch, German, Swedish and Danish centres. In most centres, the main source of alcohol for women was wine except for Murcia (Spain), where it was beer. Alcohol consumption, particularly by women, increased markedly during the weekend in nearly all centres. The German, Dutch, UK (general population) and Danish centres were characterised by the highest percentages of alcohol consumption outside mealtimes.
The large variation in drinking patterns among the EPIC centres provides an opportunity to better understand the relationship between alcohol and alcohol-related diseases.
PubMed ID
12639233 View in PubMed
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Plasma 25 hydroxyvitamin D level and blood gene expression profiles: a cross-sectional study of the Norwegian Women and Cancer Post-genome Cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115806
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2013 Jul;67(7):773-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
K. Standahl Olsen
C. Rylander
M. Brustad
L. Aksnes
E. Lund
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway. karina.s.olsen@uit.no
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2013 Jul;67(7):773-8
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body mass index
Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
European Continental Ancestry Group - genetics
Female
Genome, Human
Humans
Microarray Analysis
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - blood - complications - genetics
Norway
Nutritional Status
Questionnaires
Signal Transduction
Transcriptome
Vitamin D - analogs & derivatives - blood
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood - complications - epidemiology
Abstract
Vitamin D deficiency has been associated with increased risk of developing several diseases, but much is unknown about the molecular effects involved. Gene expression technology is increasingly being used to elucidate molecular mechanisms related to nutritional factors, and in this study of free-living, middle-aged Norwegian women, we aimed at identifying gene expression pathways in the blood associated with vitamin D status.
Blood samples and questionnaires were collected as a part of the Norwegian Women and Cancer Post-genome Cohort (500 invited subjects, 218 included). Plasma 25 hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography, and we compared groups with sufficient versus deficient vitamin D status (25(OH)D >50?nmol/l (n=66) versus
Notes
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PubMed ID
23462941 View in PubMed
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Predictors for cod-liver oil supplement use--the Norwegian Women and Cancer Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18024
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2004 Jan;58(1):128-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2004
Author
M. Brustad
T. Braaten
E. Lund
Author Affiliation
Institute of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, Norway. magritt.brustad@ism.uit.no
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2004 Jan;58(1):128-36
Date
Jan-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Cod Liver Oil - administration & dosage
Cohort Studies
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet
Diet Surveys
Dietary Supplements
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Life Style
Middle Aged
Norway
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Smoking
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To assess the use of cod-liver oil supplements among Norwegian women and to examine dietary, lifestyle, demographic, and health factors associated with use of this supplement. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SETTING AND SUBJECTS: The study is based on data from a food frequency questionnaire from 1998 answered by 37,226 women aged 41-55 y, who in 1991/1992 participated in the Norwegian component of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). The Norwegian EPIC cohort was based on a random nation-wide sample of Norwegian women. RESULTS: Cod-liver oil supplement use was reported by 44.7% of the participating women. Subjects with higher education, high physical activity level, and body mass index (BMI) in the normal range were more likely to use cod-liver oil supplements. Consumption did also increase with increased age as well as with increased reported consumption of fruits, vegetables, fatty fish, lean fish, and vitamin D (excluding the vitamin D contribution from cod-liver oil). Energy intake was higher among cod-liver oil users than nonusers. Whole-year daily users of cod-liver oil were also more likely to take other dietary supplements (OR=2.45, 95% CI: 2.28-2.62). Never smokers were more likely to use cod-liver oil supplements than current smokers. CONCLUSION: Use of cod-liver oil is associated with several sociodemographic factors, self-reported health issues, and intake of fish, fruit, and vegetables. When assessing the relationship between cod-liver oil use and occurrence of chronic diseases potential confounders need to be considered. Cod-liver oil use seemed not to be matched with vitamin D needs. Thus, emphasis on assessing vitamin D status by measuring levels in blood should be investigated further, in particular, among people living in northern latitudes.
PubMed ID
14679378 View in PubMed
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Variability of fish consumption within the 10 European countries participating in the European Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18550
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2002 Dec;5(6B):1273-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
A A Welch
E. Lund
P. Amiano
M. Dorronsoro
M. Brustad
M. Kumle
M. Rodriguez
C. Lasheras
L. Janzon
J. Jansson
R. Luben
E A Spencer
K. Overvad
A. Tjønneland
F. Clavel-Chapelon
J. Linseisen
K. Klipstein-Grobusch
V. Benetou
X. Zavitsanos
R. Tumino
R. Galasso
H B Bueno-De-Mesquita
M C Ocké
U R Charrondière
N. Slimani
Author Affiliation
Strangeways Research Laboratory, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, University of Cambridge, Wort's Causeway, UK. ailsa.welch@srl.cam.ac.uk
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2002 Dec;5(6B):1273-85
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Animals
Cross-Sectional Studies
Crustacea
Diet
Diet Surveys
Europe
Female
Fishes
Humans
Male
Mental Recall
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance - methods
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Shellfish
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To describe and compare the consumption of total fish (marine foods) and the fish sub-groups - white fish, fatty fish, very fatty fish, fish products and crustacea, in participants from the European Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study. DESIGN: Cross-sectional analysis of dietary intake using a computerised standardised 24-hour recall interview. Crude means, means and standard errors adjusted by age, season and day of the week were calculated, stratified by centre and gender. SETTING: Twenty-seven redefined centres in the 10 European countries participating in the EPIC study. SUBJECTS: In total, 35 955 subjects (13 031 men and 22 924 women), aged 35-74 years, selected from the main EPIC cohort. RESULTS: A six- to sevenfold variation in total fish consumption exists in women and men, between the lowest consumption in Germany and the highest in Spain. Overall, white fish represented 49% and 45% of the intake of total fish in women and men, respectively, with the greatest consumption in centres in Spain and Greece and the least in the German and Dutch centres. Consumption of fatty fish reflected that of total fish. However, the greatest intake of very fatty fish was in the coastal areas of northern Europe (Denmark, Sweden and Norway) and in Germany. Consumption of fish products was greater in northern than in southern Europe, with white fish products predominating in centres in France, Italy, Spain, The Netherlands and Norway. Intake of roe and roe products was low. The highest consumption of crustacea was found in the French, Spanish and Italian centres. The number of fish types consumed was greater in southern than in northern Europe. The greatest variability in consumption by day of the week was found in the countries with the lowest fish intake. CONCLUSIONS: Throughout Europe, substantial geographic variation exists in total fish intake, fish sub-groups and the number of types consumed. Day-to-day variability in consumption is also high.
PubMed ID
12639232 View in PubMed
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Vitamin D status in a rural population of northern Norway with high fish liver consumption.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70914
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2004 Sep;7(6):783-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2004
Author
M. Brustad
T. Sandanger
L. Aksnes
E. Lund
Author Affiliation
Institute of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, N-9037 Tromsø, Norway. Magritt.Brustad@ism.uit.no
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2004 Sep;7(6):783-9
Date
Sep-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Cod Liver Oil - administration & dosage
Diet Records
Female
Fishes
Food
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Rural Health
Vitamin D - administration & dosage - blood
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To assess vitamin D status and the impact of three fish meals consisting of cod liver and fresh cod-liver oil on the plasma level of vitamin D metabolites in an area with high consumption of cod liver and cod-liver oil. DESIGN: Experimental field study. METHODS: Thirty-two volunteers from the Skjervøy (70 degrees N) municipality in northern Norway were recruited to consume three traditional mølje meals, consisting of cod, cod liver, fresh cod-liver oil and hard roe, in one week. The liver and fresh cod-liver oil consumed by the participants were weighed and recorded. Blood samples were collected before the first meal, and subsequently 12 h and 4 days after the last meal. The blood samples were analysed for the vitamin D metabolites 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D). All participants answered a semi-quantitative food-frequency questionnaire, which was used to estimate usual daily nutrient intake. The study was carried out in the last part of March 2001. RESULTS: The median daily vitamin D intake estimated from the questionnaire was 9.9 microg. The proportion of subjects with baseline 25(OH)D level below 50 nmol l(-1) was 15.4% and none were below 37.5 nmol l(-1). Only "mølje consumption" and "time spent in daylight" were significantly associated with baseline log 25(OH)D. The mean total intake of vitamin D in the three servings was 272 microg (standard deviation 94 microg), ranging from 142 to 434 microg. Relative to baseline plasma concentration, the mean level of 25(OH)D decreased slightly in both post-consumption samples (P
PubMed ID
15369617 View in PubMed
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Vitamin D status of middle-aged women at 65-71 degrees N in relation to dietary intake and exposure to ultraviolet radiation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3903
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2004 Apr;7(2):327-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2004
Author
M. Brustad
E. Alsaker
O. Engelsen
L. Aksnes
E. Lund
Author Affiliation
Institute of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, N-9037 Tromsø, Norway. Magritt.Brustad@ism.uit.no
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2004 Apr;7(2):327-35
Date
Apr-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet
Diet Surveys
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Nutritional Status
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Seasons
Sunlight
Ultraviolet Rays
Vitamin D - administration & dosage - analogs & derivatives - blood
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To determine the vitamin D status of middle-aged women living in the Norwegian arctic and its relationship with vitamin D intake and exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SUBJECTS AND SETTING: This study is based on measurements of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) levels in a sub-sample of the Norwegian component of the EPIC biological bank, which consists of blood samples from a random selection of participants in the Norwegian Women and Cancer Study. From November 2001 until June 2002, 309 blood samples were collected from a total of 443 invited middle-aged women (44-59 years) in northern Norway (65-71 degrees N) (crude response rate, 69.8%). Questionnaire data provided information on dietary sources of vitamin D and UV exposure. RESULTS: Median plasma 25(OH)D concentration for the whole group was 55.0 nmol l(-1) (range 8.1-142.8 nmol l(-1)). Vitamin D intake was a significant predictor of 25(OH)D status (P=0.0003). The time of the year when the blood sample was collected significantly predicted plasma 25(OH)D level (P=0.005). Levels of 25(OH)D were positively associated (P=0.0002) with estimated hours per day of exposure to UV-B radiation. Residing in northern Norway during the summer prior to blood sampling was negatively associated with 25(OH)D concentration (P=0.001). The prevalence of moderate hypovitaminosis D was highest in January-February, when a quarter of the participants had 25(OH)D concentrations
PubMed ID
15003141 View in PubMed
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