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A 10-year survey of clinically significant blood culture isolates and antibiotic susceptibilities from adult patients with hematological diseases at a major Swedish hospital.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25350
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1990;22(4):381-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
H. Fredlund
M. Björeman
J. Kjellander
L. Sjöberg
L. Bjorne
A L Ohlin
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Microbiology, Orebro Medical Center Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1990;22(4):381-91
Date
1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
4-Quinolones
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Anti-Infective Agents - therapeutic use
Bacteria, Aerobic - isolation & purification
Comparative Study
Drug Therapy, Combination - therapeutic use
Female
Hematologic Diseases - complications - drug therapy - microbiology
Humans
Leukemia - complications
Leukemia, Nonlymphocytic, Acute - complications
Lymphoma - complications
Male
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Retrospective Studies
Septicemia - drug therapy - microbiology
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
In patients treated with cytotoxic drugs granulocytopenia and septicemia are commonly seen. In this 10-year survey 324 blood culture isolates from 184 patients with hematological diseases and septicemia were studied. The distribution of microbiological diagnoses in patients with hematological diseases as well as acute leukemia 1980-1986 was significantly different (p less than 0.01) from an unselected blood culture material from the same period. The differences are mainly seen between Enterobacteriaceae other than Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and staphylococci. The microbiological spectrum for patients with hematological disease 1987-1989 was also significantly different (p less than 0.05) from the spectrum of the same group of patients 1980-1986 due to higher frequencies of coagulase-negative staphylococci and alpha-streptococci and lower frequency of E. coli in the latter period. 40% of the isolates were gram-positive cocci during the first period and increased to 50% during the second period. The susceptibility testing indicates that trimethoprim/sulfonamide is not as good a choice as ciprofloxacin or norfloxacin for oral antibiotic prophylaxis. For intravenous therapy imipenem/cilastatin or the combinations of an aminoglycoside/piperacillin or aminoglycoside/third generation cephalosporin have advantages over aminoglycoside/trimethoprim/sulfa in combination. However, addition of isoxazolylpenicillin or vancomycin now seems necessary to cover the increasing part of gram-positive bacteria causing septicemia in patients with hematological disease.
Notes
Comment In: Scand J Infect Dis. 1991;23(4):5151957139
PubMed ID
2218401 View in PubMed
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Alternating combination chemotherapy (VMCP/VBAP) is not superior to melphalan/prednisone in the treatment of multiple myeloma patients stage III--a randomized study from MGCS.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25502
Source
Eur J Haematol. 1989 Jul;43(1):54-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1989
Author
A. Osterborg
A. Ahre
M. Björkholm
M. Björeman
G. Brenning
G. Gahrton
H. Gyllenhammar
B. Johansson
G. Juliusson
M. Järnmark
Author Affiliation
Radiumhemmet, Department of Biostatistics, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Haematol. 1989 Jul;43(1):54-62
Date
Jul-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Carmustine - administration & dosage
Clinical Trials
Comparative Study
Cyclophosphamide - administration & dosage
Doxorubicin - administration & dosage
Humans
Melphalan - administration & dosage
Middle Aged
Multiple Myeloma - drug therapy
Prednisone - administration & dosage
Prospective Studies
Random Allocation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Vincristine - administration & dosage
Abstract
86 previously untreated patients with multiple myeloma stage III entered a randomized trial comparing combination chemotherapy (VMCP/VBAP) (n = 42) with intermittent oral melphalan and prednisone (MP) treatment (n = 44). The treatment gropus were well comparable with regard to major prognostic factors. There was no statistically significant difference in the response rates, 52% (VMCP/VBAP) vs 61% (MP); in the response duration times, median 19 months vs 22 months, or in the survival times, median 24 months vs 28 months. However, survival of patients older than 65 years was significantly shorter in the VMCP/VBAP group (median 15 months) compared to the MP group (median 23 months) (p = 0.03). No significant difference in non-hematological or hematological toxicity was noted. The study further supports the notion that MP therapy should be used as primary standard treatment for patients with multiple myeloma.
PubMed ID
2670605 View in PubMed
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Long-term follow-up of patients >or=60 yr old with acute myeloid leukaemia treated with intensive chemotherapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18891
Source
Eur J Haematol. 2002 Jun;68(6):376-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2002
Author
G. Oberg
A. Killander
M. Björeman
G. Gahrton
G. Grimfors
A. Gruber
R. Hast
R. Lerner
J. Liliemark
S. Mattson
C. Paul
B. Simonsson
A-M Stalfelt
L. Stenke
U. Tidefelt
A-M Udén
M. Björkholm
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden. Gunnar.Oberg@gamma.telenordia.se
Source
Eur J Haematol. 2002 Jun;68(6):376-81
Date
Jun-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aclarubicin - administration & dosage
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols - therapeutic use
Comparative Study
Cytarabine - administration & dosage
Daunorubicin - administration & dosage
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Leukemia, Myelocytic, Acute - classification - drug therapy - mortality
Middle Aged
Survival Rate
Thioguanine - administration & dosage
Time Factors
Abstract
It is still controversial how to treat elderly patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), and results have been poor with most regimens. We report the long-term results of a randomised study performed by the Leukaemia Group of Middle Sweden during 1984-88 comparing two intensive chemotherapeutic drug combinations. Ninety patients >or=60-yr old with untreated AML were randomly allocated to treatment with daunorubicin, cytosine arabinoside (ara-C), and thioguanine (TAD) (43 patients) or a combination in which aclarubicin was substituted for daunorubicin (TAA) (47 patients). Forty-four patients (49%) entered complete remission (CR), 22/43 (51%) in the TAD group and 22/47 (47%) in the TAA group (ns). The CR rate in patients 70 yr 14/48 (29%) (P70 yr than in patients or=10 yr after inclusion of the last patient, 5/90 patients (one in the TAD group and four in the TAA group, respectively) were still alive, four in continuous complete remission and one in second complete remission. Thus, both treatment regimens appear to have similar efficacy, with a relatively high complete remission rate, and a reasonable survival as compared to other studies including some long-term survivors. However, early deaths are still numerous, particularly in patients above 70 yr of age, and the relapse rate is substantial.
PubMed ID
12225396 View in PubMed
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Natural interferon-alpha in combination with melphalan/prednisone versus melphalan/prednisone in the treatment of multiple myeloma stages II and III: a randomized study from the Myeloma Group of Central Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24100
Source
Blood. 1993 Mar 15;81(6):1428-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-15-1993
Author
A. Osterborg
M. Björkholm
M. Björeman
G. Brenning
K. Carlson
F. Celsing
G. Gahrton
G. Grimfors
H. Gyllenhammar
R. Hast
Author Affiliation
Department of Oncology (Radiumhemmet), Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm.
Source
Blood. 1993 Mar 15;81(6):1428-34
Date
Mar-15-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols - therapeutic use
Comparative Study
Humans
Interferon-alpha - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Melphalan - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Middle Aged
Multiple Myeloma - drug therapy - mortality
Neoplasm Staging
Prednisone - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Survival Rate
Abstract
Three hundred thirty-five previously untreated patients with multiple myeloma in clinical stages II and III entered a randomized trial comparing intermittent oral melphalan and prednisone (MP) therapy (n = 171) with MP in combination with natural (leukocyte-derived) alpha-interferon (MP/IFN) (n = 164). The treatment groups were comparable with regard to major prognostic factors. The response frequency was 42% in the MP group and 68% in the MP/IFN group (P
PubMed ID
8453092 View in PubMed
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Oral versus intravenous melphalan and prednisone treatment in multiple myeloma stage II. A randomized study from the Myeloma Group of Central Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25345
Source
Acta Oncol. 1990;29(6):727-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
A. Osterborg
A. Ahre
M. Björkholm
M. Björeman
G. Brenning
G. Gahrton
G. Grimfors
H. Gyllenhammar
R. Hast
B. Johansson
Author Affiliation
Department of Oncology, Karolinska Hopital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Acta Oncol. 1990;29(6):727-31
Date
1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Actuarial Analysis
Administration, Oral
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols - therapeutic use
Comparative Study
Humans
Injections, Intravenous
Melphalan - administration & dosage
Middle Aged
Multiple Myeloma - blood - drug therapy - pathology
Neoplasm Staging
Prednisone - administration & dosage
Prognosis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
Eighty-one previously untreated patients with multiple myeloma stage II entered a randomized trial comparing oral melphalan (0.25 mg/kg/day; n = 40) with intravenous melphalan (0.125 mg/kg/day; n = 41) in combination with oral prednisone (2 mg/kg/day). The courses were given for 4 days and repeated every sixth week. The treatment groups were well comparable with regard to major prognostic factors. There was no statistically significant difference in the response rates, the response duration times and the survival times. No significant difference in nonhematological and hematological toxicity was noted. Since intravenous administration of melphalan did not result in a substantial increase in response rate or survival, this study supports the use of oral melphalan/prednisone as first-line therapy for patients with multiple myeloma.
PubMed ID
2223143 View in PubMed
Less detail

6 records – page 1 of 1.