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Adverse drug reaction reporting by nurses in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164305
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2007 Jun;63(6):613-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2007
Author
M. Bäckström
Elisabet Ekman
T. Mjörndal
Author Affiliation
Division of Clinical Pharmacology, University Hospital of Umeå, S-901 85, Umeå, Sweden. martin.backstrom@pharm.umu.se
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2007 Jun;63(6):613-8
Date
Jun-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems - statistics & numerical data
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude of Health Personnel
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Middle Aged
Nurses
Physicians
Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
To investigate whether nurses could be a useful tool for improving the reporting rate of adverse drug reactions (ADRs). Furthermore, we wanted to study how physicians working at the study departments would respond to nurses as reporters of ADRs and if the reporting from the nurses affected the reporting rate from the physicians.
Three departments of internal medicine and one unit for orthopaedics were selected for the study. Nurses with special drug responsibilities were invited to participate. At the start of the study period, the nurses received an introduction with background, objective, method and other practical issues concerning the study. After this, an education programme about ADR reporting, definitions, and ADR classification according to mechanism and organ system was given. To study their knowledge about and attitude towards ADRs, a questionnaire was handed out to the nurses. A questionnaire was also handed out to all physicians at the participating departments in order to investigate their attitude towards nurses as reporters of ADRs.
Fifty-four nurses participated in the study. During the study period, a total number of 23 reports with 39 ADRs were sent to the regional centres by the nurses. Seventeen (74%) of the reports were assessed as serious. Eight of the 39 ADRs were unlabelled and all reports were considered appropriate. The reporting rate from the physicians during the study period was similar to the previous year, indicating that the nurses contributed with additional reports. At the end of the study, the nurses thought that they had enough knowledge to report ADRs. Sixty-eight percent of the physicians did not object to nurses being included as reporters of suspected ADRs.
Adverse drug reaction reporting by nurses could improve the overall safety of drugs.
PubMed ID
17404719 View in PubMed
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[A regional center for reporting adverse drug reactions in Umeå. Prompt handling results in quick feedback].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215986
Source
Lakartidningen. 1995 Jan 18;92(3):148-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-18-1995
Author
M. Bäckström
R. Dahlqvist
T. Mjörndal
O. Spigset
K. Hedenmalm
K. Granberg
U. Oqvist
B E Wiholm
Author Affiliation
Avdelningen för klinisk farmakologi, Norrlands universitetssjukhus, Umeå.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1995 Jan 18;92(3):148-50
Date
Jan-18-1995
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems - statistics & numerical data
Drug Information Services
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions
Humans
Sweden
Time Factors
PubMed ID
7837847 View in PubMed
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Attitudes to reporting adverse drug reactions in northern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72003
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2000 Dec;56(9-10):729-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2000
Author
M. Bäckström
T. Mjörndal
R. Dahlqvist
T. Nordkvist-Olsson
Author Affiliation
Division of Clinical Pharmacology, Norrland University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2000 Dec;56(9-10):729-32
Date
Dec-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems
Attitude of Health Personnel
Family Practice
Female
Humans
Male
Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: This study was designed to investigate attitudes of general practitioners (GPs) and hospital physicians in Sweden towards spontaneous reporting of adverse drug reactions (ADRs). METHOD: Two areas in the northern region of Sweden were selected for the study. A knowledge and attitude questionnaire followed by a reminder letter 2 weeks later was addressed to all GPs and hospital physicians in the study areas. RESULT: The total response rate from the study areas was 748 of the 1274 questionnaires sent out (58.7%). Of those who responded, 236 were GPs, 433 were hospital physicians and 79 had other positions. Of the responders, 252 stated that they had never reported any ADR and 488 that they had reported at least once in their career. Issues that came out as important in the decision to report or not to report were whether the reaction was considered well-known or not, the severity of the reaction, hesitance to report only on suspicion, lack of knowledge of existing rules, giving priority to other matters and lack of time to report ADRs. Only minor differences in these regards were observed between male and female physicians. CONCLUSION: Our investigation shows that the physicians in northern Sweden have a fairly good knowledge about the existing rules for reporting ADRs in Sweden. However, the attitudes leave room for considerable under-reporting due to matters related mainly to the medical impact of the reaction and of reporting it, but also to the scientific "paradox" of reporting only on suspicion and of course due to lack of time in the health care setting.
PubMed ID
11214784 View in PubMed
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Interaction between the Drug Information Centre and the Regional Centre for Adverse Drug Reaction Monitoring in northern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208843
Source
Pharm World Sci. 1997 Apr;19(2):114-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1997

Measuring adult attachment: a construct validation of two self-report instruments.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195221
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2001 Feb;42(1):79-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2001
Author
M. Bäckström
B M Holmes
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Lund University, Sweden. martin.backstrom@psychology.lu.se
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2001 Feb;42(1):79-86
Date
Feb-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Courtship
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Male
Models, Psychological
Object Attachment
Psychological Tests
Reproducibility of Results
Sweden
Abstract
This study reports the Swedish construct validation of two translated attachment style scales. The factor structure of the attachment construct was investigated via exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses of attachment scores from 515 students of a Swedish university. Results supported the expected two-factor solution, but found a three-factor solution to be a viable alternative. In addition, the attachment scales were compared with the Big Five personality inventory (NEO-PI), using a sample of 87 Swedish students, and found to have expected correlation to this scale.
PubMed ID
11273581 View in PubMed
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A small economic inducement to stimulate increased reporting of adverse drug reactions--a way of dealing with an old problem?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169999
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2006 May;62(5):381-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2006
Author
M. Bäckström
T. Mjörndal
Author Affiliation
Division of Clinical Pharmacology, University Hospital of Umeå, Umeå, Sweden. martin.backstrom@pharm.umu.se
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2006 May;62(5):381-5
Date
May-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems - economics - statistics & numerical data
Attitude of Health Personnel
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Motivation
Physician Incentive Plans - economics
Physician's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data - trends
Physicians - psychology
Sweden
Token Economy
Abstract
To assess the effect of a small economic inducement on the rate of spontaneous reporting of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and the attitudes of general practitioners and physicians towards reporting of ADRs.
One intervention and one control county were selected for the study. Written information about the main purpose of spontaneous reporting of ADRs was personally addressed to all physicians in the two counties. The information was identical, except for the addition that during a period of 6 months two lottery tickets would be given to the receivers in the intervention area with the standard personal feedback to the reporter of the ADR. After the 6-month study period, the actual number of reported ADRs and the seriousness of the reported ADRs were assessed. To investigate the attitude towards this stimulation of reporting, a questionnaire was addressed to all physicians within the intervention area (IA).
From the IA a total number of 57 ADR reports were received containing 62 suspected ADRs, 40% of which were assessed as serious reactions. From the control area (CA), 49 reports containing 50 suspected ADRs were received, 32% of which were assessed as serious reactions. The increase of ADR reports from the IA compared to the same time period the previous year was 59% as compared to an unchanged reporting from the CA. Of those responding to the questionnaire, 80% did not believe that a small economic bonus would be a useful tool to improve the reporting rate.
A small economic inducement is associated with an increase in the reporting of suspected ADRs.
PubMed ID
16572320 View in PubMed
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Spontaneous reporting of adverse drug reactions by nurses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187162
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2002 Dec;11(8):647-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
M. Bäckström
T. Mjörndal
R. Dahlqvist
Author Affiliation
Division of Clinical Pharmacology, University Hospital of Umeå Universitet S-901, 85 Umeå, Sweden. martin.backstrom@pharm.umu.se
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2002 Dec;11(8):647-50
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems - statistics & numerical data
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel
Databases, Factual - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Nurses
Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
Spontaneous reporting of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) remains one of the most effective methods to detect new and serious drug reactions. However, it is well known that there is a high degree of under-reporting.
This study was carried out as an attempt to improve and increase the reporting of ADRs by investigating the utility of nurses reporting in addition to physicians, as usual.
During a 12-month study period, nurses working at two departments of geriatric medicine in northern Sweden received special instruction regarding drugs and ADRs, ADR reporting and special aspects of ADRs in elderly people. The reports from the nurses were scrutinized concerning the seriousness of the reaction, reported drugs and type of reaction (type A or B). All nurses working at the two departments (117) were eligible to report but in practice only those attending the teaching sessions did so. A comparison with historical reporting and with reporting from other geriatric departments in Sweden was also carried out. At the end of the study all participating nurses received a questionnaire aimed at investigating their attitudes towards ADR reporting.
After the 12-month study period 18 ADR reports involving 22 reactions had been received. Seven of these were assessed as serious reactions. All of the reactions were of type A. In comparison, during the corresponding time period from the study clinics during the preceding year, only two reports were registered. During the study period only 15 reports were registered from the other 50 geriatric departments in Sweden.
Even though the total number of ADR reports was small, our data indicate a substantial increase in the reporting rate. This indicates that instructed and interested nurses could play an important role in detecting and reporting suspected ADRs.
Notes
Erratum In: Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2003 Mar;12(2):157-9
PubMed ID
12512239 View in PubMed
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[Thrombosis caused by oracl contraceptives. Underreporting to the adverse effects registry].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211053
Source
Lakartidningen. 1996 Sep 11;93(37):3117-8, 3121-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-11-1996

Under-reporting of serious adverse drug reactions in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179133
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2004 Jul;13(7):483-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2004
Author
M. Bäckström
T. Mjörndal
R. Dahlqvist
Author Affiliation
Division of Clinical Pharmacology, University Hospital of Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2004 Jul;13(7):483-7
Date
Jul-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems - economics - statistics & numerical data
Databases, Factual
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions
Humans
International Classification of Diseases
Reproducibility of Results
Sweden
Abstract
Adverse drug reactions (ADR) constitute a major problem, both from a medical point of view and as an economical burden. Spontaneous reporting of ADRs is one of the methods for post marketing surveillance of drug safety. Under-reporting can also provide an important obstacle to rapid and relevant signal detection.
To investigate the rate of under-reporting serious ADRs of selected ICD 10 diagnoses.
In order to investigate the under-reporting rate we investigated at five hospitals within the county of Norrbotten in Sweden the total number of diagnosed cases during a period of 5 years (1996-2000) with the following diagnoses: cerebral haemorrhage (I 61.0-I 61.9), pulmonary embolism (I 26.0 and I 26.9), embolism or thrombosis (I 74.0-I 74.9), phlebititis, thrombophlebitits or venous thrombosis (I 80.0-I 80.3, I 80.8 and I 80.9) and portal vein thrombosis and other thrombosis or emboli (I 82.0-I 82.3, I 82.8 and I 82.9). The identity of these patients was obtained through a database search. The patients' case records were then scrutinized by a specially trained nurse and the drugs used at the time of the event were noted. An assessment of the possibility of an ADR was performed using standard WHO causality criteria. Later, database search in the Swedish ADR registry was performed in order to investigate whether these suspected ADRs had been reported to the national authority in Sweden or not.
In total 1349 case records were found and scrutinized. Of these, 107 patients had received drugs that could have been a probable or possible cause to the diagnoses. Of these 92 cases had not been reported and only 15 patients were found in the database, giving an overall under-reporting rate of all ADRs of 86%. The most commonly occurring diagnoses were cerebral haemorrhage followed by venous thrombosis, 545 and 468 respectively. Among those cases that should have been reported according to the existing rules for spontaneous reporting of suspected ADRs the most frequently occurring diagnosis was cerebral haemorrhage (I 61.0) in connection to treatment with anticoagulants.
The rate of spontaneous ADR reporting is very low, also for serious and fatal reactions.
PubMed ID
15269932 View in PubMed
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11 records – page 1 of 2.