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Cigar and pipe smoking and cancer risk in the european prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98017
Source
Int J Cancer. 2010 Feb 16;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-16-2010
Author
Va McCormack
A. Agudo
Cc Dahm
K. Overvad
A. Olsen
A. Tjonneland
R. Kaaks
H. Boeing
J. Manjer
M. Almquist
G. Hallmans
I. Johansson
Md Chirlaque
A. Barricarte
M. Dorronsoro
L. Rodriguez
Ml Redondo
Kt Khaw
N. Wareham
N. Allen
T. Key
E. Riboli
P. Boffetta
Author Affiliation
International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France.
Source
Int J Cancer. 2010 Feb 16;
Date
Feb-16-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
The carcinogenicity of cigar and pipe smoking is established but the effect of detailed smoking characteristics is less well defined. We examined the effects on cancer incidence of exclusive cigar and pipe smoking, and in combination with cigarettes, among 102395 men from Denmark, Germany, Spain, Sweden and UK in the EPIC cohort. Hazard ratios (HR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) for cancer during a median 9 year follow-up from ages 35-70 years were estimated using proportional hazards models. Compared to never smokers, HR of cancers of lung, upper aero-digestive tract and bladder combined was 2.2 (95% CI: 1.3, 3.8) for exclusive cigar smokers (16 cases), 3.0 (2.1, 4.5) for exclusive pipe smokers (33 cases) and 5.3 (4.4, 6.4) for exclusive cigarette smokers (1069 cases). For each smoking type, effects were stronger in current than in ex-smokers, and in inhalers than in non-inhalers. Ever smokers of both cigarettes and cigars (HR 5.7 (4.4, 7.3), 120 cases) and cigarettes and pipes (5.1 (4.1, 6.4), 247 cases) had as high a raised risk as had exclusive cigarette smokers. In these smokers, the magnitude of the raised risk was smaller if they had switched to cigars or pipes only (i.e. quit cigarettes) and had not compensated with greater smoking intensity. Cigar and pipe smoking is not a safe alternative to cigarette smoking. The lower cancer risk of cigar and pipe smokers as compared to cigarette smokers is explained by lesser degree of inhalation and lower smoking intensity. (c) 2010 UICC.
PubMed ID
20162568 View in PubMed
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Mortality in patients with permanent hypoparathyroidism after total thyroidectomy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298611
Source
Br J Surg. 2018 09; 105(10):1313-1318
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
09-2018
Author
M Almquist
K Ivarsson
E Nordenström
A Bergenfelz
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Skåne University Hospital, and Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
Source
Br J Surg. 2018 09; 105(10):1313-1318
Date
09-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypoparathyroidism - etiology - mortality
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Male
Middle Aged
Postoperative Complications - mortality
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Sweden
Thyroidectomy
Abstract
Permanent hypoparathyroidism remains the most common adverse outcome after total thyroidectomy, but long-term effects of hypoparathyroidism are unknown. The aim was to investigate mortality in patients with permanent hypoparathyroidism after total thyroidectomy.
Data from the Scandinavian Quality Register for Thyroid, Parathyroid and Adrenal Surgery were linked with the Swedish National Prescription Register for Pharmaceuticals and the Swedish National Inpatient Register. Patients who underwent total thyroidectomy between 1 July 2005 and 30 June 2014 for benign thyroid disease, and who used active vitamin D for at least 6?months after surgery, were classified as having permanent hypoparathyroidism and included in the study cohort. Risk of death was assessed using Cox regression analysis, adjusting for age, sex, thyrotoxicosis and co-morbidity.
There were 4899 patients, with a mean(s.d.) age of 46·3(15·8) years; 83·1 per cent were women, and 2932 patients (59·8 per cent) had thyrotoxicosis. In all, 246 patients (5·2 per cent) were classified as having permanent hypoparathyroidism. Mean(s.d.) follow-up was 4·4(2·4) years, and 109 patients (2·2 per cent) died during follow-up. Compared with patients without permanent hypoparathyroidism, the risk of death was significantly higher among patients with permanent hypoparathyroidism after total thyroidectomy (adjusted hazard ratio 2·09, 95 per cent c.i. 1·04 to 4·20).
Permanent hypoparathyroidism after total thyroidectomy for benign disease is common and associated with an increased risk of death.
PubMed ID
29663312 View in PubMed
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Risk factors for medically treated hypocalcemia after surgery for Graves' disease: a Swedish multicenter study of 1,157 patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125465
Source
World J Surg. 2012 Aug;36(8):1933-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
P. Hallgrimsson
E. Nordenström
M. Almquist
A O J Bergenfelz
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Skåne University Hospital-Lund, 221 85, Lund, Sweden. pall.hallgrimsson@skane.se
Source
World J Surg. 2012 Aug;36(8):1933-42
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Calcium - administration & dosage
Child
Female
Graves Disease - epidemiology - surgery
Humans
Hypocalcemia - drug therapy - epidemiology - etiology
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Postoperative Complications - drug therapy - epidemiology - etiology
Registries
Risk factors
Statistics, nonparametric
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Vitamin D - administration & dosage
Abstract
For reasons that remain unclear, surgery for Graves' disease is associated with a higher risk of hypocalcemia than surgery for benign atoxic goiter. In the present study, we evaluated risk factors for postoperative hypocalcemia in patients undergoing operation for Graves' disease.
Data from 1,157 patients who underwent operation for Graves' disease between 2004 and 2008 were extracted from the Scandinavian database for Thyroid and Parathyroid Surgery. Risk factors for postoperative hypocalcemia (in-hospital i. v. calcium; treatment with vitamin D analog at discharge, at 6 weeks, and at 6 months postoperatively) were evaluated by logistic regression analysis.
Risk factors for i. v. calcium were low hospital volume of thyroid surgery (odds ratio [OR]: 95 % confidence interval [95 % CI], 0.99: 0.99-1.00), age (0.95: 0.91-1.00), operative time (1.02: 1.01-1.02), university hospital (12.91: 2.68-62.30), and reoperation for bleeding (10.32: 1.51-70.69). The risk for treatment with vitamin D at discharge increased with operative time (1.01: 1.00-1.02), excised gland weight (1.01: 1.00-1.01), parathyroid autotransplantation (5.19: 2.28-11.84), and reoperation for bleeding (12.00: 2.43-59.28). At 6 weeks, vitamin D medication was associated with gland weight (1.00: 1.00-1.01), and preoperative medication with ß-blockers (4.20: 1.67-10.55). At 6 months, vitamin D medication was associated with gland weight (1.00: 1.00-1.01) and reoperation for bleeding (10.59: 1.58-71.22).
Risk factors for medically treated hypocalcemia varied at different times of follow-up. Young age, operative time, type of hospital, and parathyroid autotransplantation were associated with early postoperatively hypocalcemia. Preoperative ß-blocker treatment was a risk factor at the first follow-up. At early and late follow-up, gland weight and reoperation for bleeding were associated with medically treated hypocalcemia.
PubMed ID
22476788 View in PubMed
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Serum calcium and the risk of prostate cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151454
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2009 Sep;20(7):1205-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2009
Author
C. Halthur
A L V Johansson
M. Almquist
J. Malm
H. Grönberg
J. Manjer
P W Dickman
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. cat.halthur@ki.se
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2009 Sep;20(7):1205-14
Date
Sep-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Body mass index
Calcium - blood
Demography
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Prostatic Neoplasms - epidemiology
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Recent studies have suggested an association between high dietary intake of calcium and the risk of prostate cancer. Calcium-rich diet has been suggested to affect the serum levels of Vitamin D, and thereby promote cancer. We conducted the largest study of the association between prediagnostic serum levels of calcium and the risk of prostate cancer.
We examined the incidence of prostate cancer in relation to prediagnostic serum calcium levels in a prospective cohort study of 22,391 healthy Swedish men, of which 1,539 incident cases of prostate cancer were diagnosed during the 30 years of follow-up until December 2006.
Serum levels of calcium were measured at baseline, and categorized into quartiles. Cox regression was used to estimate the adjusted hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI).
We found no evidence of an association between prediagnostic serum levels of calcium and risk of prostate cancer (HR for trend = 0.99 [95% CI;0.94-1.03]). However, a moderate significant negative association was seen in men with a BMI above 25 and aged below 45 years at baseline (Highest vs. lowest quartile, HR = 0.63 [95% CI;0.40-0.99]).
These data do not support the hypothesis that high serum calcium levels is a risk factor for prostate cancer. On the contrary, the data suggest that high serum levels of calcium in young overweight men may be a marker for a decreased risk of developing prostate cancer.
PubMed ID
19377857 View in PubMed
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Thyroid function and survival following breast cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281506
Source
Br J Surg. 2016 Nov;103(12):1649-1657
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2016
Author
J. Brandt
S. Borgquist
M. Almquist
J. Manjer
Source
Br J Surg. 2016 Nov;103(12):1649-1657
Date
Nov-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Antibodies - metabolism
Breast Neoplasms - mortality
Female
Humans
Iodide Peroxidase - immunology
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Sweden - epidemiology
Thyroid Gland - physiology
Thyrotropin - metabolism
Thyroxine - metabolism
Triiodothyronine - metabolism
Abstract
Thyroid function has been associated with breast cancer risk, and breast cancer cell growth and proliferation. It is not clear whether thyroid function affects prognosis following breast cancer but, if so, this could have an important clinical impact. The present study analysed prospectively collected measurements of free tri-iodothyronine (T3), free thyroxine (T4), thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPO-Ab) in relation to breast cancer survival.
The Malmö Diet and Cancer Study is a prospective cohort study of 17 035 women in Sweden. Study enrolment was conducted between 1991 and 1996. Patients with incident breast cancer were identified through record linkage with cancer registries until 31 December 2006. Information on vital status was collected from the Swedish Cause of Death Registry, with the endpoint breast cancer mortality (31 December 2013). Hazard ratios (HRs) with 95 per cent confidence intervals (c.i.) were obtained by Cox proportional hazards analysis.
Some 766 patients with incident breast cancer were identified, of whom 551 were eligible for analysis. Compared with patients in the first free T4 tertile, breast cancer mortality was lower among those in the second tertile (HR 0·49, 95 per cent c.i. 0·28 to 0·84). There was an indication, although non-significant, of lower breast cancer mortality among patients in the second TSH tertile (HR 0·63, 0·37 to 1·09) and in those with positive TPO-Ab status (HR 0·61, 0·30 to 1·23). Free T3 showed no clear association with mortality.
In the present study, there was a positive association between free T4 levels and improved breast cancer survival.
PubMed ID
27599301 View in PubMed
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