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Comparison of sexual behaviors, unprotected sex, and substance use between two independent cohorts of gay and bisexual men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature199200
Source
AIDS. 2000 Feb 18;14(3):303-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-18-2000
Author
K J Craib
A C Weber
P G Cornelisse
S L Martindale
M L Miller
M T Schechter
S A Strathdee
A. Schilder
R S Hogg
Author Affiliation
British Columbia Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS, St Paul's Hospital, Vancouver, Canada.
Source
AIDS. 2000 Feb 18;14(3):303-11
Date
Feb-18-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Bisexuality
British Columbia - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Condoms
Demography
HIV Infections - epidemiology
Homosexuality, Male
Humans
Incidence
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Prospective Studies
Sexual Partners
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Abstract
To compare demographic characteristics, sexual practices, unprotected receptive and insertive anal intercourse, substance use and rates of HIV-1 seroconversion between two prospective cohorts of HIV-negative men who have sex with men.
Comparative analysis of two independent cohorts.
Between May 1995 and April 1996, 235 HIV-negative Vanguard Project (VP) participants were enrolled and between January and December 1985, 263 HIV-negative participants in the Vancouver Lymphadenopathy AIDS Study (VLAS) completed a follow-up visit. The VP participants were compared with VLAS participants with respect to self-reported demographic variables, sexual behaviors, unprotected sex, substance use and rates of HIV-1 seroconversion during follow-up.
In comparison with the VLAS participants the VP participants were younger (median age, 26 versus 34 years; P
PubMed ID
10716507 View in PubMed
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HIV-associated risk factors among young Canadian Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal men who have sex with men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3007
Source
Int J STD AIDS. 1999 Sep;10(9):582-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1999
Author
K V Heath
P G Cornelisse
S A Strathdee
A. Palepu
M L Miller
M T Schechter
M V O'Shaughnessy
R S Hogg
Author Affiliation
British Columbia Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS, Canada.
Source
Int J STD AIDS. 1999 Sep;10(9):582-7
Date
Sep-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
HIV Infections - epidemiology - ethnology - etiology
Homosexuality, Male
Humans
Inuits
Male
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Risk-Taking
Sexual Behavior
Abstract
Young Aboriginal men face marginalization distinct in cause but similar in pattern to those seen among men who have sex with men (MSM) and may be at increased risk for HIV infection. We compared sociodemographic characteristics and risk taking behaviours associated with HIV infection among MSM of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal descent. Data for this comparison were gathered from baseline questionnaires completed by participants in a cohort study of young MSM. Data collection included: demographic characteristics such as age, length of time residing in the Vancouver region, housing, employment, income and income sources; mental health and personal support; instances of forced sex and sex trade participation and; sexual practices with regular and casual male sex partners. Data were available for 57 Aboriginal and 624 non-Aboriginal MSM. Aboriginal MSM were significantly less likely to be employed, more likely to live in unstable housing, to have incomes of 0.05). Our data indicate that among MSM, Aboriginal men are at increased risk of antecedent risk factors for HIV infection including sexual abuse, poverty, poor mental health and involvement in the sex trade.
PubMed ID
10492424 View in PubMed
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HIV infection and risk behaviours among young gay and bisexual men in Vancouver.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195663
Source
CMAJ. 2000 Jan 11;162(1):21-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-11-2000
Author
S A Strathdee
S L Martindale
P G Cornelisse
M L Miller
K J Craib
M T Schechter
M V O'Shaughnessy
R S Hogg
Author Affiliation
Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health, Baltimore, Md., USA.
Source
CMAJ. 2000 Jan 11;162(1):21-5
Date
Jan-11-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antiviral agents - therapeutic use
Attitude to Health
Bisexuality
British Columbia - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Condoms
HIV Infections - drug therapy - transmission
Homosexuality
Humans
Male
Risk-Taking
Abstract
Young gay and bisexual men may perceive that the consequences of HIV infection have dramatically improved with the availability of highly active antiretroviral therapy. We therefore sought to identify trends in HIV infection rates and associated risk behaviours among young gay and bisexual men in Vancouver.
Prospective cohort study involving gay and bisexual men aged 18-30 years who had not previously tested HIV positive. Subjects were recruited through physicians, clinics and community outreach in Vancouver. Annually participants were tested for HIV antibodies and asked to complete a self-administered questionnaire pertaining to sociodemographic characteristics, sexual behaviours and substance use. Prevalence of HIV infection and risk behaviours were determined for eligible participants who completed a baseline questionnaire and HIV testing as of May 1998. The primary outcome was the proportion of men who reported having protected sex during the year before enrollment and who reported any episode of unprotected sex by the time of the first follow-up visit.
A total of 681 men completed a baseline questionnaire and HIV testing as of May 1998. The median duration between baseline and the first follow-up visit was 14 months. The median age was 25 years. Most of the subjects were white and of high socioeconomic status. The majority (549 [80.6%]) reported having sex only with men; 81 (11.9%) reported bisexual activity. Of the 503 men who had one or more regular male partners, 245 (48.7%) reported at least one episode of unprotected anal sex in the year before enrollment; the corresponding number among the 537 who had one or more casual male partners was 140 (26.1%). The prevalence and incidence of HIV seropositivity were 1.8% (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.8%-2.8%) and 1.7 per 100 person-years [95% CI 0.7-2.7], respectively. Fifty-two (26.5%) of the 196 and 55 (29.7%) of the 185 men with regular partners who reported having practiced protected insertive and receptive anal sex in the year before the baseline visit reported engaging in these activities without a condom at the follow-up visit; the corresponding numbers among the 232 and 242 men with causal partners who had practiced protected insertive and receptive anal sex before the baseline visit were 43 (15.5%) and 26 (9.4%) respectively at follow-up.
The incidence of HIV infection is unacceptably high among this cohort of young gay and bisexual men. Preliminary results suggest a disturbing trend toward increasing levels of unprotected anal intercourse.
Notes
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Comment In: CMAJ. 2000 Jan 11;162(1):52-311216201
PubMed ID
11216194 View in PubMed
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