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33 records – page 1 of 4.

Association of lifestyle with periodontal health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11391
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1995 Jun;23(3):155-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1995
Author
T K Sakki
M L Knuuttila
S S Vimpari
M S Hartikainen
Author Affiliation
Department of Periodontology and Geriatric Dentistry, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1995 Jun;23(3):155-8
Date
Jun-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Dental Care - utilization
Diet
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health Behavior
Humans
Life Style
Likelihood Functions
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Periodontal Pocket - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Smoking - adverse effects
Social Class
Socioeconomic Factors
Statistics, nonparametric
Toothbrushing - utilization
Abstract
All the 1012, 55-yr-old citizens of Oulu (a medium-sized Finnish town) were invited to a clinical examination, and 780 of them participated. The associations of lifestyle with periodontal health were analyzed in the 527 dentate subjects. Periodontal pockets deeper than 3 mm were recorded as a percentage of the surfaces at risk. Lifestyle was measured by questions about dietary habits, smoking habits, alcohol consumption and physical activity. Lifestyle had an independent association with periodontal health. Periodontal pocketing increased with an unhealthier lifestyle. Lifestyle could explain some of the social and sex differences in periodontal health.
PubMed ID
7634770 View in PubMed
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Association of the severity of periodontal disease with organ complications in type 1 diabetic patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature48422
Source
J Periodontol. 1994 Nov;65(11):1067-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1994
Author
K M Karjalainen
M L Knuuttila
K J von Dickhoff
Author Affiliation
Department of Peridontology and Geriatric Dentistry, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
J Periodontol. 1994 Nov;65(11):1067-72
Date
Nov-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Blood Glucose - analysis
Chi-Square Distribution
Dental Calculus - complications
Dental Plaque - complications
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - complications - psychology - therapy
Diabetic Retinopathy - complications
Female
Hemoglobin A - analysis
Humans
Male
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Periodontal Diseases - etiology - pathology
Periodontal Pocket - pathology
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Self Care - psychology
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Factors
Smoking
Statistics, nonparametric
Abstract
This study examined the relationship between the severity of periodontal disease and organ complications in long-term Type 1 or insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus patients, taking account of the severity and concomitant existence of these complications. The population studied consisted of 26 Type 1 diabetics 26 to 34 years old, who had had diabetes for at least 10 years. Severity of periodontal disease was shown to increase with severity of organ complications. Patients with advanced complications had significantly more bleeding on probing, pockets > or = 4 mm deep, and more attachment loss than patients with incipient complications or no complications. Stepwise multiple regression analysis showed that the existence of advanced complications was the only diabetes-related factor predicting pockets > or = 4 mm deep. Subgingival calculus, sex, and smoking were other significant variables. Retinopathy was the organ complication most suited to comparison, since it is usually the first to appear and can easily be classified from non-existent to severe. Differences in severity of periodontal disease were less obvious if metabolic balance alone was considered than between subgroups formed on the basis of the existence of advanced complications. Severity of periodontal disease and the existence of complications were more closely related to long-term glucose balance than single, most recent HbA1 values. Prevalence of pockets at sites with subgingival calculus increased with severity of complications.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
7853131 View in PubMed
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The association of yeasts and denture stomatitis with behavioral and biologic factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10940
Source
Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol Endod. 1997 Dec;84(6):624-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1997
Author
T K Sakki
M L Knuuttila
E. Läärä
S S Anttila
Author Affiliation
Department of Periodontology and Geriatric Dentistry, Institute of Dentistry, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol Endod. 1997 Dec;84(6):624-9
Date
Dec-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Biology
Colony Count, Microbial
Denture Retention
Denture, Complete - adverse effects
Female
Food Habits
Health Behavior
Humans
Lactobacillus - growth & development - isolation & purification
Life Style
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity
Mouth - physiology
Oral Hygiene
Prevalence
Reagent Strips - diagnostic use
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Saliva - secretion
Secretory Rate
Sex Factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Social Class
Stomatitis, Denture - etiology - microbiology
Yeasts - growth & development - isolation & purification - physiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: This study describes the association of yeasts and denture stomatitis with behavioral and biologic factors. STUDY DESIGN: Seven hundred eighty 55-year-old citizens of Oulu, Finland, were examined clinically; 452 of them had complete dentures. Salivary yeasts and lactobacillus counts were detected through the use of Oricult-N and Dentocult-LB dip-slide techniques. Lifestyle factors were measured by means of questions concerning physical activity, tobacco smoking, alcohol consumption, and dietary habits. Other background variables used in cross-tabulations and logistic regression analysis were unstimulated salivary secretion rate, retention of denture, oral hygiene, gender, and socioeconomic status. RESULTS: The prevalence of denture stomatitis was greater among subjects with an unhealthy lifestyle, subjects with higher lactobacillus counts, and subjects with poor oral hygiene. Salivary secretion rate and smoking were associated with the presence of yeasts, but general lifestyle measures were not. CONCLUSION: The presence of yeasts tended to be associated with biologic factors, but behavioral factors reflecting lifestyle may be more important in the development of denture stomatitis.
PubMed ID
9431530 View in PubMed
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Attributions to dental and diabetes health outcomes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47885
Source
J Clin Periodontol. 2000 Mar;27(3):205-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2000
Author
M C Kneckt
A M Syrjälä
M L Knuuttila
Author Affiliation
Institute of Dentistry, University of Oulu, Finland. mkneckt@hotmail.com
Source
J Clin Periodontol. 2000 Mar;27(3):205-11
Date
Mar-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health
Chi-Square Distribution
Dental caries - etiology - prevention & control
Dental Plaque Index
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - metabolism - prevention & control - psychology
Female
Forecasting
Gingivitis - prevention & control
Health Behavior
Hemoglobin A - analysis
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Oral Health
Oral Hygiene
Patient compliance
Patient Education
Periodontal Index
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self Assessment (Psychology)
Self Care
Self Concept
Abstract
Previous studies have proposed common psychological factors between oral health behavior and diabetes self-care. The aim here was to describe and analyse more comprehensively the relationships between dental and diabetes health behavior on the basis of attribution theory. The likeness between subjects' own assessments, similarities of the causes given to success and failure, and the predictive power of own dental assessments concerning the metabolic balance of diabetes were studied. The research population was composed of 149 IDDM patients. Data were collected by means of a quantitative questionnaire, a clinical oral examination and from patient records. It was found that from the patients reporting success with avoiding gingivitis 82% also reported success with metabolic status and they also had lower mean HbA1c levels than patients assessing failure with gingivitis. There were some correlations between causes of failure: not bothering to clean approximal surfaces correlated with non-adherence to diabetes treatment instructions, and laziness as the cause of caries correlated with non-adherence to diabetes treatment instructions and with poor motivation for diabetes care. It can be concluded that there are some common determinants for both dental health behavior and diabetes self-care. This connection should be taken into account in health education by health care professionals.
PubMed ID
10743868 View in PubMed
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Dental self-efficacy as a determinant to oral health behaviour, oral hygiene and HbA1c level among diabetic patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47944
Source
J Clin Periodontol. 1999 Sep;26(9):616-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1999
Author
A M Syrjälä
M C Kneckt
M L Knuuttila
Author Affiliation
Department of Periodontology, Institute of Dentistry, University of Oulu, Finland. Anna-Maija.Syrjala@oulu.fi
Source
J Clin Periodontol. 1999 Sep;26(9):616-21
Date
Sep-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Dental Care - psychology - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Dental Care for Chronically Ill - psychology - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Dental Plaque Index
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - metabolism - psychology
Female
Health Education, Dental
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - analysis
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Oral Hygiene - psychology - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology
Patient compliance
Self Efficacy
Statistics, nonparametric
Abstract
Because of a mutual association between severity of periodontitis and poor control of IDDM, regular dental visits and daily oral care are important among diabetics. The aim was to develop a method for analysing dental self-efficacy and to study the relationship between dental self-efficacy and reported oral health behaviour and oral hygiene. The relationship between oral health behaviour and HbA1c level was also studied. Data were collected in relation to 149 IDDM patients by means of a quantitative questionnaire, evaluation of dental plaque and patient records. Results showed that tooth brushing self-efficacy, approximal cleaning self-efficacy and dental visiting self-efficacy related to corresponding reported oral health behaviour (p
PubMed ID
10487313 View in PubMed
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Depressive symptoms as an underlying factor of the sensation of dry mouth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10903
Source
Psychosom Med. 1998 Mar-Apr;60(2):215-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
S S Anttila
M L Knuuttila
T K Sakki
Author Affiliation
Department of Periodontology and Geriatric Dentistry, Institute of Dentistry, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Psychosom Med. 1998 Mar-Apr;60(2):215-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chi-Square Distribution
Comorbidity
Depression - complications - epidemiology - physiopathology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Saliva - secretion
Sex Factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Xerostomia - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology - psychology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this survey was to study the sensation of oral dryness and its underlying factors in the 55-year-old population of Oulu (a medium-sized Finnish town), 780 of whom (77%) participated. METHOD: In addition to the examination of oral health status and salivary flow rate measurements, depressive symptoms were determined on the basis of the Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale (ZSDS). The participants were also interviewed about their health, medication, physical health, physical activity, smoking habits, alcohol consumption, and factors related to their work. RESULTS: The prevalence of subjective sensations of dry mouth was 25.8% among men and 33.3% among women (p = 0.025). A statistically significant association was found between a subjective sensation of dry mouth and a low unstimulated flow rate, regular smoking, xerogenic medication, and the presence of at least one illness connected with dry mouth. Those who had a sensation of dry mouth also thought their physical condition and their health to be poorer and more often had a high rate of depressive symptoms. After the confounding factors had been added stepwise into the logistic regression model, depressive symptoms were still significantly associated with the sensation of oral dryness. CONCLUSIONS: When evaluating the causes of the sensation of dry mouth, the possibility of depression as an underlying factor should be considered.
PubMed ID
9560872 View in PubMed
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Depressive symptoms associated with symptoms of the temporomandibular joint pain and dysfunction syndrome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46489
Source
Psychosom Med. 1995 Sep-Oct;57(5):439-44
Publication Type
Article
Author
S S Vimpari
M L Knuuttila
T K Sakki
S L Kivelä
Author Affiliation
Department of Periodontology and Geriatric Dentistry, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Psychosom Med. 1995 Sep-Oct;57(5):439-44
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Pain - complications - physiopathology
Pain Measurement
Prevalence
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Questionnaires
Sex Factors
Stress, Psychological - psychology
Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction Syndrome - complications - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
This paper discusses the findings in the 1012 55-year-old inhabitants of Oulu (a medium-sized Finnish town), 780 of whom (77%) were examined. The purpose was to determine the possible associations between depressive symptoms and subjective and clinical symptoms of the temporomandibular joint pain and dysfunction syndrome (PDS). The PDS symptoms were determined using Helkimo's Clinical Dysfunction Index. Depressive symptoms in 768 subjects were determined using Zung's self-rating depression scale. The prevalences of high rates of depressive symptoms, subjective symptoms of PDS, and clinical symptoms of PDS in the population were 12.2%, 12.0%, and 4.9%, respectively. Subjective symptoms of PDS were more common in depressed dentate men and women than in nondepressed dentate men and women. There was a significantly higher prevalence of subjective symptoms of PDS in depressed edentulous women than in nondepressed edentulous women. There were significantly more moderate or severe clinical symptoms of PDS in depressed dentate women than in nondepressed dentate women. A similar trend was seen in dentate men. An integrated approach is of crucial importance in the diagnosis and treatment of depression and the temporomandibular joint pain and dysfunction syndrome.
PubMed ID
8552734 View in PubMed
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Depressive symptoms favor abundant growth of salivary lactobacilli.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46248
Source
Psychosom Med. 1999 Jul-Aug;61(4):508-12
Publication Type
Article
Author
S S Anttila
M L Knuuttila
T K Sakki
Author Affiliation
Department of Periodontology and Geriatric Dentistry, Institute of Dentistry, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Psychosom Med. 1999 Jul-Aug;61(4):508-12
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Dental Caries - etiology - microbiology
Depression - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Humans
Lactobacillus - growth & development - isolation & purification
Male
Middle Aged
Oral Hygiene
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Saliva - microbiology
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The purpose was to study the growth of lactobacilli in subjects with depressive symptoms in the total 55-year-old population of Oulu (a medium-sized town in Finland); 780 people participated. METHODS: The dental examination included measurements of salivary lactobacillus growth with the Dentocult-LB method; measurements of salivary flow rate, pH, and buffering capacity; and assessment of oral health status. Depressive symptoms were determined with the Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale (ZSDS). Participants were also asked about their health, medication, smoking, and dietary habits. RESULTS: The prevalence of high lactobacillus counts (> or =100,000 CFU/ml) was 22% among women and 31% among men (p = .02). Thirty-seven percent of the subjects with a high rate of depressive symptoms (ZSDS score of > or = 40) and 23% of those with an ZSDS score of
PubMed ID
10443759 View in PubMed
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Dietary xylitol protects against weakening of bone biomechanical properties in ovariectomized rats.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10812
Source
J Nutr. 1998 Oct;128(10):1811-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1998
Author
P T Mattila
M J Svanberg
P. Pökkä
M L Knuuttila
Author Affiliation
Institute of Dentistry, University of Oulu, 90220 Oulu, Finland.
Source
J Nutr. 1998 Oct;128(10):1811-4
Date
Oct-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Biomechanics
Bone Density - drug effects
Comparative Study
Diet
Female
Osteoporosis - prevention & control
Ovariectomy
Rats
Rats, Wistar
Xylitol - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Abstract
The effects of dietary xylitol (xyl) on bone biomechanical properties in ovariectomized rats (ovx) were studied. Forty-two 3-mo-old female Wistar rats were divided into three groups of 14. Rats in two groups were ovariectomized, while those in the control group underwent a sham operation. All rats received a basal diet, and half of the ovx were given an additional 10 g/100 g dietary xyl supplementation. Three months later the rats were killed and their tibias, femurs and humeri were prepared. The tibias were used for analyses of bone density and trabecular bone volume (BV/TV) and for the three-point bending test. The femurs were used for the torsion test and for the loading test of the femoral neck. The humeri were used for analyses of bone ash weight and bone concentrations of calcium and phosphorus. Dietary xyl gave a significant protection against ovariectomy-caused decline of tibial stress in the three-point bending test, of femoral shear stress in the torsion test, and of stress of the femoral neck, without affecting bone elasticity values. Xyl restricted the ovariectomy-caused reduction in bone density, in bone ash weight and in concentrations of bone calcium and phosphorus. Furthermore, trabecular bone loss in ovx was significantly suppressed by dietary xyl. These results indicate that a 10% dietary supplementation of xyl in ovx has a protective effect against the weakening of bone biomechanical properties. This is related to greater BV/TV and maintained bone mineral content.
PubMed ID
9772154 View in PubMed
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Dietary xylitol, sorbitol and D-mannitol but not erythritol retard bone resorption in rats.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11214
Source
J Nutr. 1996 Jul;126(7):1865-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1996
Author
P T Mattila
M J Svanberg
K K Mäkinen
M L Knuuttila
Author Affiliation
Institute of Dentistry, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
J Nutr. 1996 Jul;126(7):1865-70
Date
Jul-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Bone Resorption - physiopathology - prevention & control
Comparative Study
Diet
Erythritol - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Male
Mannitol - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Random Allocation
Rats
Rats, Sprague-Dawley
Sorbitol - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Structure-Activity Relationship
Sugar Alcohols - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Tritium - urine
Weight Gain - drug effects
Xylitol - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to compare the ability of four dietary polyols to reduce bone resorption. Urinary excretion of 3H radioactivity from [3H]tetracycline-prelabeled rats was used as a marker of bone resorption. After prelabeling, the rats were divided randomly into five groups of 10, and fed for 1 mo a nonpurified diet that was supplemented in four groups with either xylitol, sorbitol, D-mannitol or erythritol, respectively, to give a polyol concentration of 1 mol/kg. Xylitol (42%), sorbitol (44%) and to a lesser degree D-mannitol (23%) decreased the excretion of 3H relative to the basal diet. The erythritol group, however, did not differ from the controls. Sorbitol caused continuous diarrhea, whereas in the other groups, intestinal adaptation took place during the 1st wk of polyol feeding. In conclusion, dietary xylitol, sorbitol and to a lesser degree D-mannitol supplementations in rats retard bone resorption, whereas dietary erythritol has no effect.
PubMed ID
8683349 View in PubMed
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33 records – page 1 of 4.