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Addressing challenges in participatory research partnerships in the North: opening a conversation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120750
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2012;71
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Rhonda M Johnson
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2012;71
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Community-Based Participatory Research - ethics
Health Services Research
Humans
Public-Private Sector Partnerships
Notes
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2007 Feb;66(1):8-1817451130
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2007 Feb;66(1):19-3017451131
Cites: J Urban Health. 2007 Jul;84(4):478-9317436114
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2009 Sep;68(4):405-1319917192
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2012;71(0):1-922584512
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011;70(5):473-8722067096
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2012;71(0):1-822584509
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2012;71(0):1-722584510
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2012;71(0):1-722584511
Cites: Health Promot Int. 2010 Mar;25(1):115-2219854843
PubMed ID
22973564 View in PubMed
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An exploration of the burden experienced by spousal caregivers of individuals with Parkinson's disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146173
Source
Mov Disord. 2010 Jan 30;25(2):189-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-30-2010
Author
Kaitlyn P Roland
Mary E Jenkins
Andrew M Johnson
Author Affiliation
Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, The University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada.
Source
Mov Disord. 2010 Jan 30;25(2):189-93
Date
Jan-30-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Caregivers - psychology
Disability Evaluation
Emotions
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Parkinson Disease - nursing - psychology - rehabilitation
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Safety
Severity of Illness Index
Social Isolation - psychology
Stress, Psychological - etiology
Abstract
Although previous research has attempted to identify the needs of caregivers for individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD), most has focused on the demands associated with the physical needs of the patient, and not on "mental burden." This study used the repertory grid method to capture the full range of caregivers' subjective experience, quantify their perceptions, and to acquire information that might be useful in directing remediation attempts. Within this sample, caregivers reported far greater burden from "mental stress" (e.g., worrying about individual's safety) than from "physical stress" (e.g., lifting individual into bed). Specifically, caregivers were primarily concerned about spousal safety, as this requires continuous vigilance and constant worry. Caregivers also reported experiencing "little deaths" as the disease progresses, related to a loss of independence for the couple, and the steady diminishment of social networks. Increasing attention on the mental burden experienced by spousal caregivers promises to increase quality of care, and quality of life for individuals with PD, by improving quality of life for the caregiver.
Notes
Comment In: Mov Disord. 2010 Oct 15;25(13):2254-520803516
PubMed ID
20063397 View in PubMed
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Assessment of Ontario's Geriatric Preventive Dentistry Program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature231169
Source
Can J Public Health. 1989 Mar-Apr;80(2):136-41
Publication Type
Article
Author
P M Johnson
R B Deber
Source
Can J Public Health. 1989 Mar-Apr;80(2):136-41
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Geriatric Dentistry
Health Resources
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Ontario
Preventive Dentistry
Program Evaluation
Public Health Dentistry
Public Policy
Abstract
Ontario's Geriatric Preventive Dentistry Program (mandated under the Health Protection and Promotion Act) is assessed using the rational comprehensive approach. Policy options are examined, taking into account population characteristics, the nature of the health problem, current service delivery policy and resources, and barriers to access. Examining the 1974 Task Force recommendations, sets of draft guidelines issued in 1982, 1983, and 1984, and the revised 1985 guidelines as implemented, one can note changes in the benefits offered and in eligibility for coverage. The final program appears to be largely a symbolic policy response, which is unlikely to have major implications for either efficiency or community effectiveness. Implications of the current program, including the possibility it may be a precursor to more effective policies, are noted.
Notes
Comment In: Can J Public Health. 1989 Jul-Aug;80(4):3062790641
PubMed ID
2720541 View in PubMed
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Bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia: a prospective study in Edmonton and neighboring municipalities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174912
Source
Medicine (Baltimore). 2005 May;84(3):147-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2005
Author
Mohammed Reza Shariatzadeh
Jane Q Huang
Gregory J Tyrrell
Marcia M Johnson
Thomas J Marrie
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Medicine (Baltimore). 2005 May;84(3):147-61
Date
May-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bacteremia - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Homeless Persons - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Pneumonia, Pneumococcal - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious - epidemiology
Prisoners - statistics & numerical data
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Abstract
Bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia (BPP) is an important disease that should be frequently re-evaluated due to changes in demographics and recommended treatment. We conducted a prospective study from 2000 to 2002 in adults aged 17 years and over who presented to any of 6 hospitals and 1 freestanding emergency room in Edmonton, Alberta, with signs and symptoms compatible with pneumonia, a chest radiograph interpreted as pneumonia by the attending physician, and a positive blood culture for Streptococcus pneumoniae. We identified 129 patients with BPP, for an overall incidence of 9.7/100,000 person years. The rate was markedly higher among pregnant women, homeless persons, and those in prison. Sixteen percent were managed as outpatients, 61.2% as ward patients, and 22.5% required admission to the intensive care unit (ICU). Tobacco smoking was predictive of BPP, and antibiotic therapy before presentation was protective. According to pneumonia severity index, 47.3% were in low-risk classes I-III, 31.0% were in class IV, and 21.7% were in class V. Twelve (9.3%) patients died. Four died within 24 hours of arrival at hospital, and 2 had end-stage lung disease that resulted in a decision to discontinue therapy. Of the S. pneumoniae isolates, 12.5% were not susceptible to penicillin. The overall rate of BPP appears to be decreasing, although the rate is markedly increased in certain populations, which now should be targeted for vaccination. We identified 3 subsets of patients with BPP according to the site of care (ambulatory, ward, and ICU), with different outcomes.
PubMed ID
15879905 View in PubMed
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Benzene and total hydrocarbon exposures in the upstream petroleum oil and gas industry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198791
Source
AIHAJ. 2000 Mar-Apr;61(2):255-63
Publication Type
Article
Author
D K Verma
D M Johnson
J D McLean
Author Affiliation
Occupational and Environmental Health Laboratory, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
Source
AIHAJ. 2000 Mar-Apr;61(2):255-63
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Benzene - adverse effects - analysis
Canada
Extraction and Processing Industry
Humans
Hydrocarbons - adverse effects - analysis
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Petroleum
Abstract
Occupational exposures to benzene and total hydrocarbons (THC) in the Canadian upstream petroleum industry are described in this article. A total of 1547 air samples taken by 5 oil companies in various sectors (i.e., conventional oil/gas, conventional gas, heavy oil processing, drilling and pipelines) were evaluated and summarized. The data includes personal long- and short-term samples and area long-term samples. The percentage of samples over the occupational exposure limit (OEL) of 3.2 mg/m3 or one part per million for benzene, for personal long-term samples ranges from 0 to 0.7% in the different sectors, and area long-term samples range from 0 to 13%. For short-term personal samples, the exceedance for benzene is at 5% with respect to the OEL of 16 mg/m3 or five parts per million in the conventional gas sector and none in the remaining sectors. THC levels were not available for all sectors and had limited data points in others. The percentage exceedance of the OEL of 280 mg/m3 or 100 parts per million for THC as gasoline ranged from 0 to 2.6% for personal long-term samples. It is recommended that certain operations such as glycol dehydrators be carefully monitored and that a task-based monitoring program be included along with the traditional long- and short-term personal exposure sampling.
PubMed ID
10782197 View in PubMed
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A case-control study of medium-term exposure to ambient nitrogen dioxide pollution and hospitalization for stroke.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114640
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:368
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Julie Y M Johnson
Brian H Rowe
Ryan W Allen
Paul A Peters
Paul J Villeneuve
Author Affiliation
Population Studies Division, Health Canada, Ottawa, Canada.
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:368
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Air Pollution - adverse effects
Canada - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Environmental Exposure - classification
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nitrogen Dioxide - adverse effects
Odds Ratio
Particulate Matter - adverse effects
Risk factors
Social Class
Stroke - epidemiology
Vehicle Emissions
Abstract
There are several plausible mechanisms whereby either short or long term exposure to pollution can increase the risk of stroke. Over the last decade, several studies have reported associations between short-term (day-to-day) increases in ambient air pollution and stroke. The findings from a smaller number of studies that have looked at long-term exposure to air pollution and stroke have been mixed. Most of these epidemiological studies have assigned exposure to air pollution based on place of residence, but these assignments are typically based on relatively coarse spatial resolutions. To date, few studies have evaluated medium-term exposures (i.e, exposures over the past season or year). To address this research gap, we evaluated associations between highly spatially resolved estimates of ambient nitrogen dioxide (NO2), a marker of traffic pollution, and emergency department visits for stroke in Edmonton, Canada.
This was a case-control study with cases defined as those who presented to an Edmonton area hospital emergency department between 2007 and 2009 with an acute ischemic stroke, hemorrhagic stroke, or transient ischemic attack. Controls were patients who presented to the same emergency departments for lacerations, sprains, or strains. A land-use regression model provided estimates of NO2 that were assigned to the place of residence. Logistic regression methods were used to estimate odds ratios for stroke in relation to an increase in the interquartile range of NO2 (5 ppb), adjusted for age, sex, meteorological variables, and neighborhood effects.
The study included 4,696 stroke (cases) and 37,723 injury patients (controls). For all strokes combined, there was no association with NO2. Namely, the odds ratio associated with an interquartile increase in NO2 was 1.01 (95% confidence interval {CI}: 0.94-1.08). No associations were evident for any of the stroke subtypes examined.
When combined with our earlier work in Edmonton, our findings suggest that day-to-day fluctuations in air pollution increase the risk of ischemic stroke during the summer season, while medium term exposures are unrelated to stroke risk. The findings for medium term exposure should be interpreted cautiously due to limited individual-level risk factor data.
Notes
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Cites: Circulation. 2003 Mar 25;107(11):1463-612654599
PubMed ID
23597019 View in PubMed
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Climate Degradation and Extreme Icing Events Constrain Life in Cold-Adapted Mammals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296102
Source
Sci Rep. 2018 01 18; 8(1):1156
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Date
01-18-2018
Author
J Berger
C Hartway
A Gruzdev
M Johnson
Author Affiliation
Fish, Wildlife and Conservation Biology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, 80523, USA. jberger@wcs.org.
Source
Sci Rep. 2018 01 18; 8(1):1156
Date
01-18-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Body Size
Climate Change - mortality
Cold Climate
Disasters - history
Female
History, 19th Century
History, 21st Century
Male
Otters - physiology
Rain
Ruminants - physiology
Snow
Tsunamis - history
Whales - physiology
Abstract
Despite the growth in knowledge about the effects of a warming Arctic on its cold-adapted species, the mechanisms by which these changes affect animal populations remain poorly understood. Increasing temperatures, declining sea ice and altered wind and precipitation patterns all may affect the fitness and abundance of species through multiple direct and indirect pathways. Here we demonstrate previously unknown effects of rain-on-snow (ROS) events, winter precipitation, and ice tidal surges on the Arctic's largest land mammal. Using novel field data across seven years and three Alaskan and Russian sites, we show arrested skeletal growth in juvenile muskoxen resulting from unusually dry winter conditions and gestational ROS events, with the inhibitory effects on growth from ROS events lasting up to three years post-partum. Further, we describe the simultaneous entombment of 52 muskoxen in ice during a Chukchi Sea winter tsunami (ivuniq in Iñupiat), and link rapid freezing to entrapment of Arctic whales and otters. Our results illustrate how once unusual, but increasingly frequent Arctic weather events affect some cold-adapted mammals, and suggest that an understanding of species responses to a changing Arctic can be enhanced by coalescing groundwork, rare events, and insights from local people.
Notes
Cites: Physiol Plant. 2010 Oct;140(2):128-40 PMID 20497369
Cites: Science. 2009 Sep 11;325(5946):1355-8 PMID 19745143
Cites: Sci Rep. 2015 Mar 02;5:8676 PMID 25728642
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Cites: Ambio. 2006 Nov;35(7):347-58 PMID 17256639
Cites: Semin Fetal Neonatal Med. 2004 Oct;9(5):419-25 PMID 15691778
Cites: Proc Biol Sci. 1998 Feb 22;265(1393):341-50 PMID 9523435
PubMed ID
29348632 View in PubMed
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Climate Degradation and Extreme Icing Events Constrain Life in Cold-Adapted Mammals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288223
Source
Sci Rep. 2018 Jan 18;8(1):1156
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-18-2018
Author
J. Berger
C. Hartway
A. Gruzdev
M. Johnson
Source
Sci Rep. 2018 Jan 18;8(1):1156
Date
Jan-18-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Despite the growth in knowledge about the effects of a warming Arctic on its cold-adapted species, the mechanisms by which these changes affect animal populations remain poorly understood. Increasing temperatures, declining sea ice and altered wind and precipitation patterns all may affect the fitness and abundance of species through multiple direct and indirect pathways. Here we demonstrate previously unknown effects of rain-on-snow (ROS) events, winter precipitation, and ice tidal surges on the Arctic's largest land mammal. Using novel field data across seven years and three Alaskan and Russian sites, we show arrested skeletal growth in juvenile muskoxen resulting from unusually dry winter conditions and gestational ROS events, with the inhibitory effects on growth from ROS events lasting up to three years post-partum. Further, we describe the simultaneous entombment of 52 muskoxen in ice during a Chukchi Sea winter tsunami (ivuniq in I?upiat), and link rapid freezing to entrapment of Arctic whales and otters. Our results illustrate how once unusual, but increasingly frequent Arctic weather events affect some cold-adapted mammals, and suggest that an understanding of species responses to a changing Arctic can be enhanced by coalescing groundwork, rare events, and insights from local people.
Notes
Cites: Physiol Plant. 2010 Oct;140(2):128-4020497369
Cites: Science. 2009 Sep 11;325(5946):1355-819745143
Cites: Sci Rep. 2015 Mar 02;5:867625728642
Cites: Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci. 2014 Apr 14;369(1643):2013019624733951
Cites: Nature. 2012 Jul 19;487(7407):358-6122763443
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2011 Nov 1;108(44):17905-922025683
Cites: Science. 2013 Jan 18;339(6117):313-523329044
Cites: Conserv Biol. 2012 Oct;26(5):769-7722834930
Cites: Science. 2016 Sep 9;353(6304):27609898
Cites: Science. 2013 Aug 2;341(6145):519-2423908231
Cites: Animal. 2009 May;3(5):657-6922444443
Cites: Science. 2016 Jun 10;352(6291):1274-527284180
Cites: Biol Lett. 2016 Nov;12 (11):27852939
Cites: Trends Ecol Evol. 2001 May 1;16(5):254-26011301155
Cites: Ambio. 2006 Nov;35(7):347-5817256639
Cites: Semin Fetal Neonatal Med. 2004 Oct;9(5):419-2515691778
Cites: Proc Biol Sci. 1998 Feb 22;265(1393):341-509523435
PubMed ID
29348632 View in PubMed
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Compliance with the screening mammography program of British Columbia: will she return?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211996
Source
Can J Public Health. 1996 May-Jun;87(3):176-80
Publication Type
Article
Author
M M Johnson
T G Hislop
L. Kan
A J Coldman
A. Lai
Author Affiliation
Research Advisory Council, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.
Source
Can J Public Health. 1996 May-Jun;87(3):176-80
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
British Columbia
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Mammography - psychology
Mass Screening - psychology
Middle Aged
Patient compliance
Questionnaires
Referral and Consultation
Abstract
To identify factors associated with compliance in the Screening Mammography Program of British Columbia (SMPBC).
Factors associated with rescreening within 18 months (annual compliers) and between 18 to 36 months later (late compliers) were identified in a cohort of SMPBC screenees using a self-administered questionnaire.
Fewer than half of women initially screened within the SMPBC were annual compliers, nearly 40% not returning by 3 years. In women age 50+ years, annual compliers tended to have no prior mammography, no prior breast pain, a physician referral to SMPBC, and a normal initial SMPBC mammogram. Late compliers also tended to have no prior mammography, a physician referral, and a normal initial SMPBC mammogram.
Several modifiable factors associated with compliance were identified: a physician referral to the program and possibly subsequent referral back to the program after workup for an abnormal mammogram.
PubMed ID
8771920 View in PubMed
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Concussion in youth ice hockey: it's time to break the cycle.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135195
Source
CMAJ. 2011 May 17;183(8):921-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-17-2011
Author
L Syd M Johnson
Author Affiliation
Novel Tech Ethics, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS. syd.johnson@dal.ca
Source
CMAJ. 2011 May 17;183(8):921-4
Date
May-17-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Brain Concussion - etiology - prevention & control
Canada
Hockey - injuries
Humans
Male
Young Adult
Notes
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Comment In: CMAJ. 2011 Jul 12;183(10):1175; author reply 117521746834
PubMed ID
21502353 View in PubMed
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65 records – page 1 of 7.