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43 records – page 1 of 5.

Acute fulminant pancreatitis: debridement or formal resection of the pancreas.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220623
Source
HPB Surg. 1993 Aug;6(4):255-60, discussion 260-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1993
Author
H. Kiviniemi
J. Mäkelä
M I Kairaluoma
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Oulu University Central Hospital, Finland.
Source
HPB Surg. 1993 Aug;6(4):255-60, discussion 260-2
Date
Aug-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Debridement - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Length of Stay
Male
Middle Aged
Pancreas - surgery
Pancreatitis - etiology - surgery
Patient Admission
Postoperative Complications
Reoperation
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
During the ten year period from 1980 to 1989, 51 patients were treated at Oulu University Central Hospital for fulminant acute pancreatitis. Five were in a moribund state on admission and died shortly afterwards, 6 were treated conservatively and survived, and 40 were operated on, 17 by primary pancreatic resection and 23 by debridement of the peripancreatic area. Mortality rates were 53 per cent for the resection group and for the debridement group 22 per cent. Reoperations were performed in 24 per cent of patients in the pancreatic resection group and in 60 per cent of those in the debridement group. The high mortality rate associated with primary pancreatic resection has caused us to adopt a more conservative strategy, and surgical treatment is directed towards later complications of this severe disease.
PubMed ID
8217922 View in PubMed
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Adenocarcinoma of the gastric cardia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature23435
Source
Surg Oncol. 1995;4(2):75-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
J T Mäkelä
T. Juvonen
S. Laitinen
M I Kairaluoma
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, University Central Hospital, Oulu, Finland.
Source
Surg Oncol. 1995;4(2):75-81
Date
1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - mortality - surgery
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cardia - pathology
Comparative Study
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Stomach Neoplasms - mortality - surgery
Survival Rate
Abstract
One hundred and ninety-five patients operated on for adenocarcinoma of the gastric cardia during the years 1961-90 were analysed and the present data indicate that the more enthusiastic attitude adopted towards resective surgery led to a significant increase in operative explorations performed and in resectability rate, from 50% (44/88) and 35% (28/88) during the years 1961-75 to 84% (90/107) and 56% (60/107) during the years 1976-90, respectively. The difference between radical resections, 54% (15/28) and 67% (34/60), remained non-significant. The overall postoperative mortality and morbidity after resective surgery were 14% and 35% and these rates did not rise with time. The anastomotic leakage rate was 15%. Anastomotic leakage was, in fact, not only the most common postoperative complication but also the most common cause of death. Overall cumulative survivals at 1, 3 and 5 years were 47%, 11% and 5%. Comparison of the cumulative survival rates between the 15-year periods indicated that there were no differences in overall survival or in survival after resective surgery. We regard these results disappointing, because over half of the patients died in 1 year and because the long-term survival remained dismal.
PubMed ID
7551262 View in PubMed
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Apolipoprotein E phenotype, cholesterol and breast and prostate cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20132
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2000 Dec;54(12):938-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2000

Assessment of tissue viability in frostbite by 99Tcm-HDP scintigraphy: an experimental study in New Zealand white rabbits.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51696
Source
Nucl Med Commun. 1992 Jul;13(7):542-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1992
Author
J. Junila
P. Torniainen
O. Kaarela
M I Kairaluoma
T. Waris
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Oulu University Central Hospital, Finland.
Source
Nucl Med Commun. 1992 Jul;13(7):542-6
Date
Jul-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Ear, External - pathology - radionuclide imaging
Frostbite - pathology - radionuclide imaging
Rabbits
Technetium Tc 99m Medronate - diagnostic use
Abstract
Since the appearance of superficial tissue is often an unreliable indicator of deep tissue viability in cases of frostbite, radionuclide scintigraphy with 99Tcm-disodium oxidronate (HDP) was used to assess changes in tissue viability after experimental freezing and thawing of the rabbit ear. One shaved ear, left or right, of each of eight New Zealand white rabbits was frozen with a glass bottle (diameter of bottom 2 cm) filled with liquid nitrogen (-180 degrees C) for 5 min under Ketalar-Rompun anesthesia, the other ear serving as a control. Radionuclide scintigraphy was performed by giving a bolus intravenous injection of 130-170 MBq (3.5-4.5 mCi) 99Tcm-HDP. Radionuclide imaging was used to follow the development of the demarcation line. Scintigraphy was performed 2 h after frostbite and then after 24 h, 48 h, 1 week and 3 weeks. The frostbitten area seemed macroscopically to be warm and swollen immediately after the induction of frostbite. Scintigraphy showed the frostbitten area to be much warmer than the surrounding tissue for the first week and it was not until after that the first cold spots appeared in the middle of the frostbitten area. The necrotic and vital tissue could easily be distinguished after 3 weeks.
PubMed ID
1495680 View in PubMed
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Can degenerative aortic valve stenosis be related to persistent Chlamydia pneumoniae infection?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54308
Source
Ann Intern Med. 1998 May 1;128(9):741-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1-1998
Author
J. Juvonen
T. Juvonen
A. Laurila
J. Kuusisto
E. Alarakkola
T. Särkioja
C A Bodian
M I Kairaluoma
P. Saikku
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Oulu University Hospital, Finland.
Source
Ann Intern Med. 1998 May 1;128(9):741-4
Date
May-1-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aortic Valve Stenosis - microbiology
Cadaver
Chlamydia Infections - diagnosis
Chlamydophila pneumoniae - isolation & purification
Female
Humans
Immunoenzyme Techniques
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Statistics
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The cause of age-related degenerative (tricuspid) aortic valve calcification is largely unknown, but one typical characteristic is an active inflammatory process. The presence of Chlamydia pneumoniae in aortic valve stenosis was recently shown. OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that if persistent C. pneumoniae infection plays an active role in the development of aortic stenosis, the organism can be detected in the healthy aortic valves of young persons. DESIGN: A cadaver study. SETTING: Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland. SUBJECTS: 46 consecutive cadavers undergoing autopsy. Measurements: Macroscopic and histologic pathology of aortic valves was determined. The presence of C. pneumoniae was determined by immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: 34 of 46 valves were macroscopically normal. Early lesions of aortic valve disease were found in 12 valves (no lesions in valves from persons 20 to 40 years of age [n = 15], 4 lesions in valves from persons 41 to 60 years of age [n = 16], and 8 lesions in valves from persons older than 60 years of age [n = 15]; P = 0.004). Fifteen of 34 normal valves (44%) and 10 of 12 valves with early lesions (83%) had positive results on staining for C. pneumoniae (P = 0.02). In persons older than 60 years of age, the chance of an early lesion was higher if the valve tested positive for C. pneumoniae (7 of 8 valves with C. pneumoniae infection compared with 1 of 7 valves without C. pneumoniae infection; P = 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: Chlamydia pneumoniae is frequently present in aortic valves and is associated with early lesions of aortic valve stenosis in elderly persons.
PubMed ID
9556468 View in PubMed
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Characteristics of symptomatic gallbladder disease in patients with either solitary or multiple cholesterol gallstones.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature23643
Source
Hepatogastroenterology. 1994 Jun;41(3):263-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1994
Author
T. Juvonen
O. Niemelä
J. Mäkelä
M I Kairaluoma
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Oulu University Hospital, Finland.
Source
Hepatogastroenterology. 1994 Jun;41(3):263-6
Date
Jun-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Case-Control Studies
Cholangitis - complications - pathology
Cholecystectomy
Cholelithiasis - chemistry - complications - pathology - surgery
Cholesterol
Female
Gallbladder Neoplasms - complications - pathology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Pain - etiology
Pancreatitis - complications - pathology
Postoperative Complications - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Recent studies have indicated that solitary or multiple gallstones may differ with respect to the conditions favoring their formation, such as nucleation time. We examined the clinical, histological and laboratory characteristics of symptomatic gallstone disease in a series of 125 consecutive patients with either solitary (n = 33) or multiple (n = 92) cholesterol gallstones undergoing cholecystectomy. The nature of biliary pain was found to differ in the two groups. Histological diagnoses of acute cholecystitis and gallbladder cancer was more frequent in the patients with multiple stones, and cholesterolosis in those with solitary stones. Furthermore, the stone cholesterol content was higher in the solitary stone group than in the multiple stone group. Morbid complications such as cholangitis and pancreatitis were rare and occurred only in the multiple stone group. The results support the view that gallbladder disease presents histological evidence of biliary complications more often in patients with multiple cholesterol stones than in those with solitary stones.
PubMed ID
7959550 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Ann Chir Gynaecol. 1976;65(2):132-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1976
Author
P. Kärkölä
M I Kairaluoma
T K Larmi
Source
Ann Chir Gynaecol. 1976;65(2):132-7
Date
1976
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Atrial Fibrillation - etiology
Disability Evaluation
Embolism - etiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mitral Valve Insufficiency - complications
Mitral Valve Stenosis - complications - surgery
Postoperative Complications
Abstract
During an average follow-up period of five years (from 1966 to 1975) 60 patients, 43 females and 17 males, were subjected to closed mitral valvulotomy at the Oulu University Central Hospital. Two patients died when still in hospital, and one died later at home. 25 % of whole series, and 41 % of the patients with atrial fibrillastion presented with a history of preoperative systemic embolism. Intraoperative embolism occurre in one patient, and late embolism in two patients. All these patients survived. Excellent or good results were recorded for 66 % of the living patients. Significant mitral calcification and/or preoperative regurgitation affected adversely both mortality and functional results. Closed mitral valvulotomy still offers excellent palliation with a minor risk for a significant number of carefully selected patients with mitral stenosis.
PubMed ID
962276 View in PubMed
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A comparison of transthoracic and transhiatal resection for thoracic oesophageal cancer. Observations of 30 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24995
Source
Ann Chir Gynaecol. 1991;80(4):340-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
J. Mäkelä
S. Laitinen
M I Kairaluoma
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, University Central Hospital, Oulu, Finland.
Source
Ann Chir Gynaecol. 1991;80(4):340-5
Date
1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - mortality - surgery
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - mortality - surgery
Comparative Study
Esophageal Neoplasms - mortality - surgery
Esophagectomy - methods
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Postoperative Complications - mortality
Survival Rate
Thoracotomy - methods
Abstract
The transthoracic and transhiatal resection techniques are compared using the 30-year experience of Oulu University Central Hospital. During the period 1960-1982 we favoured resections trough a transthoracic route, while during the period 1983-1989 a transhiatal route was preferred. This change, and the more enthusiastic attitude adopted towards resection, has lead to an increase in resectability from 23% (46/203) to 62% (43/69) (P less than 0.0001). The difference between radical resections, 50% (23/46) and 37% (16/43) has remained non-significant. Morbidity was higher after transthoracic than transhiatal resections, 57% (26/46) versus 42% (18/43), whereas mortality was nearly the same, 11% (5/46) and 9% (4/43). Postoperative pulmonary complications occurred in 28% (13/46) after transthoracic resection and in 14% (6/43) after transhiatal resection. No significant difference was detected in the development of late anastomotic strictures, 33% (15/46) and 30% (13/43), respectively. We conclude that transhiatal resection is as safe as transthoracic resection and seems to allow more resections to be carried out without any increase in mortality or morbidity, but long-term survival remains poor.
PubMed ID
1814256 View in PubMed
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Complications of peptic ulcer disease before and after the introduction of H2-receptor antagonists.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224093
Source
Hepatogastroenterology. 1992 Apr;39(2):144-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1992
Author
J. Mäkelä
S. Laitinen
M I Kairaluoma
Author Affiliation
Oulu University Central Hospital, Department of Surgery, Finland.
Source
Hepatogastroenterology. 1992 Apr;39(2):144-8
Date
Apr-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Duodenal Ulcer - complications - drug therapy
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Histamine H2 Antagonists - therapeutic use
Humans
Incidence
Intestinal Obstruction - etiology - surgery
Male
Middle Aged
Peptic Ulcer Hemorrhage - etiology - surgery
Peptic Ulcer Perforation - etiology - surgery
Postoperative Complications - mortality
Stomach Ulcer - complications - drug therapy
Surgical Procedures, Operative - statistics & numerical data
Time Factors
Abstract
This study was undertaken in order to evaluate the incidence of operations for bleeding, perforated and obstructing peptic ulcers in a defined population before and after the introduction of H2-receptor antagonists. The annual incidence of surgery for all peptic ulcer complications increased slightly, from 6.9 per 10(5) individuals in 1977 to 14.2 per 10(5) in 1989 (n.s.), whereas the annual incidence of operations for ulcer bleeding and perforation remained relatively stable, varying from 2.8 to 8.9 per 10(5) inhabitants and from 2.3 to 7.5 per 10(5) inhabitants during the study period. Operations performed for gastric outlet obstruction did not increase, varying from 0.8 to 2.2 per 10(5) individuals over the study period. The annual proportion of emergency operations did not increase. Young men and old women were often operated on for bleeding (p less than 0.0001) and perforated ulcers (p less than 0.01). Duodenal ulcer bleeding and perforation were more frequent in the young patient groups. Overall mortality after operations performed for bleeding was 15%, and that after operations for perforation or obstruction, 17% and 8%, respectively. The mean age of the fatalities, 63 +/- 13 years, was significantly higher than that of those who survived after operation, 53 +/- 15 years (p 0.0001). Mortality was higher after operations for gastric ulcer complications (22%) than after operations for duodenal ulcer complications (10%) (p less than 0.01).
PubMed ID
1353048 View in PubMed
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Cost effectiveness of preoperative ultrasound in primary parathyroid surgery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature23826
Source
Ann Chir Gynaecol. 1994;83(4):279-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Author
M V Kairaluoma
J. Kellosalo
H. Mäkäräinen
K. Haukipuro
M I Kairaluoma
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Oulu University Hospital, Finland.
Source
Ann Chir Gynaecol. 1994;83(4):279-83
Date
1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenoma - surgery - ultrasonography
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Double-Blind Method
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hyperparathyroidism - surgery - ultrasonography
Male
Middle Aged
Parathyroid Neoplasms - surgery - ultrasonography
Parathyroidectomy - economics
Prospective Studies
Thyroid Diseases - surgery - ultrasonography
Ultrasonography - economics
Abstract
A prospective, randomized, blind study was undertaken to assess whether preoperative ultrasound (US) localization of the abnormal parathyroid glands is cost-effective in patients undergoing initial neck exploration for primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT). Twenty-eight patients were randomly allocated into two groups. In Group I the results of preoperative US were reported to the surgeon before exploration, and in Group II he was not informed of the US results. All patients underwent bilateral neck exploration, performed by the same surgeon. The operating room time was recorded and the operating room costs calculated. They included the total costs of cervical US in Group I. The cure and morbidity rates in Group I were 100% and 14% and those in Group II 86% and 7%, respectively (P > 0.05). The mean operating room time of 97 +/- 15 min in Group I was significantly lower than that of 113 +/- 23 min in Group II (P 0.4) because the costs of preoperative US, the least expensive of the localization studies, of 497 FIM negated any cost savings achieved by the reduced operating room time. We thus conclude that preoperative US before initial neck exploration for PHPT is not cost-effective.
PubMed ID
7733610 View in PubMed
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43 records – page 1 of 5.