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8 records – page 1 of 1.

A 1-year follow-up of low birth weight infants with and without bronchopulmonary dysplasia: health, growth, clinical lung disease, cardiovascular and neurological sequelae.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59584
Source
Early Hum Dev. 1992 Sep;30(2):109-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1992

Alfentanil-induced rigidity in newborn infants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59593
Source
Anesth Analg. 1992 Aug;75(2):252-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1992
Author
M L Pokela
P T Ryhänen
M E Koivisto
K T Olkkola
A L Saukkonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Anesth Analg. 1992 Aug;75(2):252-7
Date
Aug-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alfentanil - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Anoxia - prevention & control
Critical Care
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Newborn, Diseases - therapy
Injections, Intravenous
Muscle Rigidity - chemically induced
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiration, Artificial
Abstract
The authors evaluated whether alfentanil could be given before treatment procedures in critically ill mechanically ventilated neonates without adverse effects. Alfentanil (mean dose 11.7 micrograms/kg, range 9-15) was given intravenously to 20 mechanically ventilated critically ill newborn infants (mean birth weight 2510 g, range 1490-3990) during the first 3 days of life before treatment procedures. Heart rate, arterial blood pressure, transcutaneous partial pressure of O2, respiratory rate, and general activity were observed continuously from 10 min before the administration of alfentanil until 1 h after it. Plasma alfentanil concentrations were measured in 15 subjects. The pharmacokinetics of alfentanil varied greatly among the subjects. The hemodynamic changes were not clinically significant, and the most important side effect was muscle rigidity. Nine infants had mild or moderate rigidity, which had little or no effect on ventilation. Four infants had severe rigidity and jerking comparable to convulsive activity, transiently impairing ventilation and oxygenation for approximately 5-10 min. Increased inspired oxygen and increased pressure by manual ventilation were needed to prevent hypoxemia. Electroencephalographic recordings for three infants during alfentanil administration showed no evidence of increased seizure activity. We conclude that alfentanil should not be used for newborn infants without simultaneous muscle relaxation because of the danger of rigidity.
PubMed ID
1632539 View in PubMed
Less detail

Fluid restriction for preventing bronchopulmonary dysplasia? Reduced fluid intake during the first weeks of life improves the outcome of low-birth-weight infants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59639
Source
Acta Paediatr. 1992 Mar;81(3):207-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1992
Author
O K Tammela
M E Koivisto
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Acta Paediatr. 1992 Mar;81(3):207-12
Date
Mar-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia - etiology - prevention & control
Female
Fluid therapy - methods
Glucose - administration & dosage
Humans
Infant
Infant, Low Birth Weight - physiology
Infant, Newborn
Male
Potassium - administration & dosage
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Newborn - complications - physiopathology
Risk factors
Sodium, Dietary - administration & dosage
Treatment Outcome
Water-Electrolyte Imbalance - complications - prevention & control - therapy
Abstract
One hundred consecutive low-birth-weight infants (less than 1751 g) were randomized equally into "dry" and "control" groups. Fluid administration in the dry group followed the schema 50, 60, 70, 80, 90, 100 and 120 ml/kg/day during the first week and 150 ml/kg/day until aged four weeks and that of the control group 80, 100, 120 and 150 ml/kg/day during the first week and 200 ml/kg afterwards. The diagnosis of bronchopulmonary dysplasia was based on typical roentgenographic findings, clinical symptoms and a supplemental oxygen requirement at age one month. Mean weight loss was greater in the dry group than in the control group (8.8 vs 6.2%), but there was no difference in weight between the groups at the age of four weeks. Twelve of the patients died, one in the dry group and 11 in the control group (five died during the first 24 h and the remaining six between three days and three months). Twenty-seven subjects in the dry group and 15 in the control group were alive and had no signs of bronchopulmonary dysplasia at age 28 days (p less than 0.05), the numbers at term being 28 and 14, respectively (p less than 0.01). These results suggest that fluid restrictions can reduce the mortality and morbidity of low-birth-weight infants. Infants of this kind, with respiratory distress, show poor tolerance to fluids, especially during the first weeks of life.
PubMed ID
1511192 View in PubMed
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Long-term pulmonary sequelae in low birthweight infants with and without respiratory distress syndrome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature37162
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand. 1991 May;80(5):542-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1991

Magnetic resonance imaging at term and neuromotor outcome in preterm infants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58779
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2000 Mar;89(3):348-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2000
Author
A M Valkama
E L Pääkkö
L K Vainionpää
F P Lanning
E A Ilkko
M E Koivisto
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, University of Oulu, Finland. marita.valkama@oulu.fi
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2000 Mar;89(3):348-55
Date
Mar-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Brain - pathology
Cerebral Palsy - diagnosis
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Infant, Premature, Diseases - diagnosis
Infant, Very Low Birth Weight
Intracranial Hemorrhages - diagnosis
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sensitivity and specificity
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
In order to evaluate the value of neonatal brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for predicting neuromotor outcome in very low birthweight (VLBW) preterm infants, 51 such infants with gestational age
Notes
Comment In: Acta Paediatr. 2000 Mar;89(3):264-510772270
PubMed ID
10772285 View in PubMed
Less detail

Prediction of permanent hearing loss in high-risk preterm infants at term age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58744
Source
Eur J Pediatr. 2000 Jun;159(6):459-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2000
Author
A M Valkama
K T Laitakari
E U Tolonen
M R Väyrynen
L K Vainionpää
M E Koivisto
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, University of Oulu, Finland. marita.valkama@oulu.fi
Source
Eur J Pediatr. 2000 Jun;159(6):459-64
Date
Jun-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Deafness - diagnosis
Evoked Potentials, Auditory, Brain Stem
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Male
Neonatal Screening
Predictive value of tests
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
The aim of this series was to assess hearing screenings; auditory brainstem responses (ABR), transient evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAE) and free field auditory responses (FF) for the prediction of permanent bilateral hearing loss in high-risk preterm infants at term post-conceptional age. A total of 51 preterm infants (gestational age
PubMed ID
10867855 View in PubMed
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The relationship of fluid restriction during the 1st month of life to the occurrence and severity of bronchopulmonary dysplasia in low birth weight infants: a 1-year radiological follow up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59620
Source
Eur J Pediatr. 1992 May;151(5):367-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1992
Author
O K Tammela
F P Lanning
M E Koivisto
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Eur J Pediatr. 1992 May;151(5):367-71
Date
May-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia - etiology - mortality - radiography
Female
Fluid Therapy - adverse effects - methods
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hyaline Membrane Disease - etiology - mortality - radiography
Incidence
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Male
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
One hundred consecutive low birth weight (LBW) infants (less than 1751 g) were randomized into a study group having a restricted fluid intake until 4 weeks of age and a control group following the fluid regimen conventionally used in the hospital. Chest X-ray films were examined on admission, at the ages of 3 days, 7 days, 2 weeks and 4 weeks and at 2-monthly visits to the outpatient clinic up to 1 year of age or until the chest examinations were normal. The severity of hyaline membrane disease (HMD) and typical radiological abnormalities of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) were assessed. Twelve patients succumbed, one in the study group and 11 in the control group. The study group seemed experience less severe HMD than the controls. Fifty-four percent of the former and 32% of the latter were alive and had no radiological signs of BPD at 4 weeks of age (P less than 0.05). The difference between the groups in the cumulative number of normal chest X-ray examinations during the follow up was even more significant. The percentage of normal X-ray films at 1 year of age was 92% in the study group and 72% in the control group. These results suggest that fluid restriction for the first 4 weeks of life can lower the incidence of radiological abnormalities typical of BPD obtained during the 1st year of life in LBW infants. Pulmonary oedema seems to be a significant aetiological factor causing HMD to develop into chronic lung disease.
PubMed ID
1396893 View in PubMed
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The relationship of fluid restriction during the 1st month of life to the occurrence and severity of bronchopulmonary dysplasia in low birth weight infants: a 1-year radiological follow up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59630
Source
Eur J Pediatr. 1992 Apr;151(4):295-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1992
Author
O K Tammela
F P Lanning
M E Koivisto
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Eur J Pediatr. 1992 Apr;151(4):295-9
Date
Apr-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia - epidemiology - prevention & control - radiography
Fluid therapy - methods
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hyaline Membrane Disease - radiography - therapy
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Abstract
One hundred consecutive low birth weight (LBW) infants (less than 1751 g) were randomized into a study group having a restricted fluid intake until 4 weeks of age and a control group following the fluid regimen conventionally used in the hospital. Chest X-ray films were examined on admission, at the ages of 3 days, 7 days, 2 weeks and 4 weeks and at bi-monthly visits to the out-patient clinic up to 1 year of age or until the chest examinations were normal. The severity of hyaline membrane disease (HMD) and typical radiological abnormalities of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) were assessed. Twelve patients succumbed, 1 in the study group and 11 in the control group. The study group seemed to experience less severe HMD than the controls. Of the former 54% and 32% of the latter were alive and had no radiographical signs of BPD at 4 weeks of age (P less than 0.05). The difference between the groups in the cumulative number of normal chest X-ray examinations during the follow up was even more significant. The percentage of normal X-ray films at 1 year of age was 92% in the study group and 72% in the control group. These results suggest that fluid restriction for the first 4 weeks of life can lower the incidence of radiological abnormalities typical of BPD obtained during the 1st year of life in LBW infants. Pulmonary oedema seems to be a significant aetiological factor causing HMD to develop into chronic lung disease.
PubMed ID
1499583 View in PubMed
Less detail

8 records – page 1 of 1.