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Attenuation of the epidemic increase in non-Hodgkin's lymphomas in Spain.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97095
Source
Ann Oncol. 2010 May;21 Suppl 3:iii90-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
R. Marcos-Gragera
M. Pollán
M D Chirlaque
J. Gumà
M J Sanchez
I. Garau
Author Affiliation
Girona Epidemiology Unit and Cancer Registry, Department of Health, Girona, Spain. rmarcos@ico.scs.es
Source
Ann Oncol. 2010 May;21 Suppl 3:iii90-96
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Attenuation of the epidemic increase in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) incidence has recently been reported in the USA and Nordic European countries. After two decades of steadily increasing NHL, this study sought to ascertain whether a similar stabilisation might have taken place in Spain in recent years. PATIENTS AND METHODS: NHL cases were drawn from 13 population-based Spanish cancer registries with a record of at least 10 years of uninterrupted registration during the period 1975-2004. Overall and age-specific changes in incidence rates were evaluated using change-point Poisson models, which allow for accurate detection and estimation of trend changes. RESULTS: A total of 21 335 NHL cases (11 531 male and 9804 female) were identified. Although overall age- and registry-adjusted incidence rates rose by 5.74% annually among men and 6.58% among women across the period 1975-95, a statistically significant change-point was nevertheless detected in both sexes in 1996, followed by stabilisation. CONCLUSIONS: In Spain, NHL incidence levelled off in 1996 after a sharp increase during the 1970s and 1980s. This stabilisation is, partially at least, linked to the decrease in incidence of AIDS-related lymphomas among young adults.
PubMed ID
20427366 View in PubMed
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Consumption of dairy products in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort: data from 35 955 24-hour dietary recalls in 10 European countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18551
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2002 Dec;5(6B):1259-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
A. Hjartåker
A. Lagiou
N. Slimani
E. Lund
M D Chirlaque
E. Vasilopoulou
X. Zavitsanos
F. Berrino
C. Sacerdote
M C Ocké
P H M Peeters
D. Engeset
G. Skeie
A. Aller
P. Amiano
G. Berglund
S. Nilsson
A. McTaggart
E A Spencer
K. Overvad
A. Tjønneland
F. Clavel-Chapelon
J. Linseisen
M. Schulz
B. Hemon
E. Riboli
Author Affiliation
Section of Medical Statistics, University of Oslo, PO Box 1122, Blindern, N-0317 Norway. anette.hjartaker@basalmed.uio.no
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2002 Dec;5(6B):1259-71
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Dairy Products
Diet
Diet Surveys
Europe
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Recall
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance - methods
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To describe and compare the consumption of dairy products in cohorts included in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). METHODS: Data from single 24-hour dietary recall interviews collected through a highly standardised computer-based program (EPIC-SOFT) in 27 redefined centres in 10 European countries between 1995 and 2000. From a total random sample of 36 900, 22 924 women and 13 031 men were selected after exclusion of subjects under 35 and over 74 years of age. RESULTS: A high total consumption of dairy products was reported in most of the centres in Spain and in the UK cohort sampled from the general population, as well as in the Dutch, Swedish and Danish centres. A somewhat low consumption was reported in the Greek centre and in some of the Italian centres (Ragusa and Turin). In all centres and for both sexes, milk constituted the dairy sub-group with the largest proportion (in grams) of total dairy consumption, followed by yoghurt and other fermented milk products, and cheese. Still, there was a wide range in the contributions of the different dairy sub-groups between centres. The Spanish and Nordic centres generally reported a high consumption of milk, the Swedish and Dutch centres reported a high consumption of yoghurt and other fermented milk products, whereas the highest consumption of cheese was reported in the French centres. CONCLUSION: The results demonstrate both quantitative and qualitative disparities in dairy product consumption among the EPIC centres. This offers a sound starting point for analyses of associations between dairy intake and chronic diseases such as cancer.
PubMed ID
12639231 View in PubMed
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Food sources of carbohydrates in a European cohort of adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18553
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2002 Dec;5(6B):1197-215
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
E. Wirfält
A. McTaggart
V. Pala
B. Gullberg
G. Frasca
S. Panico
H B Bueno-de-Mesquita
P H M Peeters
D. Engeset
G. Skeie
M D Chirlaque
P. Amiano
E. Lundin
A. Mulligan
E A Spencer
K. Overvad
A. Tjønneland
F. Clavel-Chapelon
J. Linseisen
U. Nöthlings
E. Polychronopoulos
K. Georga
U R Charrondière
N. Slimani
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Lund University, Malmö, SE-20502 Sweden. elisabet.wirfalt@smi.mas.lu.se
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2002 Dec;5(6B):1197-215
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Diet Surveys
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Europe
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Male
Mental Recall
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance - methods
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To describe the average consumption of carbohydrate-providing food groups among study centres of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). METHODS: Of the 27 redefined EPIC study centres, 19 contributed subjects of both genders and eight centres female participants only (men, women, after exclusion of subjects under 35 and over 74 years of age from the original 36 900 total). Dietary data were obtained using the 24-hour recall methodology using the EPIC-SOFT software. The major sources of dietary carbohydrate were identified, and 16 food groups were examined. RESULTS: The 10 food groups contributing most carbohydrate were bread; fruit; milk and milk products; sweet buns, cakes and pies; potato; sugar and jam; pasta and rice; vegetables and legumes; crispbread; and fruit and vegetable juices. Consumption of fruits as well as vegetables and legumes was higher in southern compared with northern centres, while soft drinks consumption was higher in the north. Italian centres had high pasta and rice consumption, but breakfast cereal, potato, and sweet buns, cakes and pies were higher in northern centres. In Sweden, lower bread consumption was balanced with a higher consumption of crispbread, and with sweet buns, cakes and pies. Overall, men consumed higher amounts of vegetables and legumes, bread, soft drinks, potatoes, pasta and rice, breakfast cereal and sugar and jam than women, but fruit consumption appeared more frequent in women. CONCLUSION: The study supports the established idea that carbohydrate-rich foods chosen in northern Europe are different from those in the Mediterranean region. When comparing and interpreting diet-disease relationships across populations, researchers need to consider all types of foods.
PubMed ID
12639227 View in PubMed
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Physical activity of subjects aged 50-64 years involved in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18554
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2002 Dec;5(6B):1163-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
M. Haftenberger
A J Schuit
M J Tormo
H. Boeing
N. Wareham
H B Bueno-de-Mesquita
M. Kumle
A. Hjartåker
M D Chirlaque
E. Ardanaz
C. Andren
B. Lindahl
P H M Peeters
N E Allen
K. Overvad
A. Tjønneland
F. Clavel-Chapelon
J. Linseisen
M M Bergmann
A. Trichopoulou
P. Lagiou
S. Salvini
S. Panico
E. Riboli
P. Ferrari
N. Slimani
Author Affiliation
German Institute of Human Nutrition, Department of Epidemiology, Arthur Scheunert Allee 114-116, D-14558 Potsdam-Rehbrücke, Germany. haftenb@mail.dife.de
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2002 Dec;5(6B):1163-76
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cross-Sectional Studies
Europe
Exercise
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupations
Population Surveillance - methods
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Recreation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To describe physical activity of participants in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). DESIGN: A cross-sectional analysis of baseline data of a European prospective cohort study. SUBJECTS: This analysis was restricted to participants in the age group 50-64 years, which was represented in all EPIC centres. It involved 236 386 participants from 25 centres in nine countries. In each EPIC centre, physical activity was assessed by standardised and validated questions. Frequency distribution of type of professional activity and participation in non-professional activities, and age-adjusted means, medians and percentiles of time dedicated to non-professional activities are presented for men and women from each centre. RESULTS: Professional activity was most frequently classified as sedentary or standing in all centres. There was a wide variation regarding participation in different types of non-professional activities and time dedicated to these activities across EPIC centres. Over 80% of all EPIC participants engaged in walking, while less than 50% of the subjects participated in sport. Total time dedicated to recreational activities was highest among the Dutch participants and lowest among men from Malmö (Sweden) and women from Naples (Italy). In all centres, total time dedicated to recreational activity in the summer was higher than in the winter. Women from southern Europe spent the most time on housekeeping. CONCLUSIONS: There is a considerable variation of physical activity across EPIC centres. This variation was especially evident for recreational activities in both men and women.
PubMed ID
12639225 View in PubMed
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