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A bibliography of cancer among American Indians & Alaskan Natives, 1966-1994.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4084
Source
Alaska Med. 1995 Apr-Jun;37(2):63-71
Publication Type
Bibliography/Resource List
Author
M C Mahoney
A M Michalek
Author Affiliation
Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York, USA.
Source
Alaska Med. 1995 Apr-Jun;37(2):63-71
Language
English
Publication Type
Bibliography/Resource List
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology
Humans
Indians, North American
Inuits
Neoplasms - ethnology
PubMed ID
7661329 View in PubMed
Less detail

A bibliometric analysis of cancer among American Indians & Alaska Natives, 1966-1993.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4085
Source
Alaska Med. 1995 Apr-Jun;37(2):59-62, 77
Publication Type
Article
Author
M C Mahoney
A M Michalek
Author Affiliation
Department of Educational Affairs, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York 14263, USA.
Source
Alaska Med. 1995 Apr-Jun;37(2):59-62, 77
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology
Bibliometrics
Humans
Indians, North American
Inuits
MEDLINE
Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Abstract
A bibliometric analysis was employed to objectively assess scientific studies published between 1966 and 1993 which have described cancer among American Indians and Alaska Natives. Searches of the MEDLINE (1966-1993) and CANCERLIT data bases (1983-1994) were used to identify relevant publications. In addition to examining publication sources and quantitative temporal trends, further bibliometric analyses were completed by considering a subset of papers published between 1982 and 1992. A total of 128 studies of cancer among American Indians and Alaska Natives were published between 1966 and 1993; 62 of these articles (48%) appeared between 1988 and 1993. Nine journals accounted for 53% of the total publications. The subset of 68 papers published between 1982 and 1992 were cited a total of 388 times in 136 different journals; the median number of citations was 2. Results demonstrate a limited number of published papers on cancer among American Indians and Alaska Natives. It is hoped that this paper will increase the awareness of cancer as an important health problem among American Indian and Alaska Natives and thereby serve to stimulate additional cancer-related research activities involving these groups.
PubMed ID
7661328 View in PubMed
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Childhood leukaemia in Belarus, Russia, and Ukraine following the Chernobyl power station accident: results from an international collaborative population-based case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29376
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2005 Nov 3;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-3-2005
Author
S. Davis
R W Day
K J Kopecky
M C Mahoney
P L McCarthy
A M Michalek
K B Moysich
L E Onstad
V F Stepanenko
P G Voillequé
T. Chegerova
K. Falkner
S. Kulikov
E. Maslova
V. Ostapenko
N. Rivkind
V. Shevchuk
A F Tsyb
Author Affiliation
Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA, USA; School of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2005 Nov 3;
Date
Nov-3-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
BACKGROUND: There is little evidence regarding the risk of leukaemia in children following exposure to radionuclides from the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant explosion on April 26, 1986. METHODS: This population-based case-control study investigated whether acute leukaemia is increased among children who were in utero or
PubMed ID
16269548 View in PubMed
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Health status of American Indians/Alaska Natives: general patterns of mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3017
Source
Fam Med. 1998 Mar;30(3):190-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1998
Author
M C Mahoney
A M Michalek
Author Affiliation
Department of Educational Affairs, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY, USA. mmahoney@ubmed.buffalo.edu
Source
Fam Med. 1998 Mar;30(3):190-5
Date
Mar-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents - mortality
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Canada - epidemiology
Cause of Death
Child
Child, Preschool
Databases, Factual - statistics & numerical data
Diabetes Mellitus - mortality
Female
Health status
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Population Surveillance
Sex Distribution
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Investigations of American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) populations suggest patterns of mortality that differ from the general population. Mortality data reveal excess overall mortality among AI/ANs, as well as excesses for specific causes of death, including accidents, diabetes, liver disease, pneumonia/influenza, suicide, homicide, and tuberculosis. A relative deficit of deaths has been noted for heart disease, cancer, and HIV infections. It is important that physicians demonstrate cultural competence so they may provide quality medical care for the populations they serve. Activities such as provider education, risk assessment, and emphasis on preventive services are offered to facilitate integration into teaching curricula. Knowledge of distinctive mortality patterns among AI/ANs will help clinicians recognize the unique needs of these patients.
PubMed ID
9532441 View in PubMed
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The health status of American Indians and Alaska Natives: 2. Lessons for cancer educators.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3996
Source
J Cancer Educ. 1999;14(1):23-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999
Author
M C Mahoney
A M Michalek
Author Affiliation
Department of Educational Affairs, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York 14263, USA.
Source
J Cancer Educ. 1999;14(1):23-7
Date
1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cause of Death
Education, Medical, Continuing - organization & administration
Health status
Humans
Incidence
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Neoplasms - ethnology - mortality - prevention & control
Population Surveillance
Survival Analysis
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Malignant disease is largely unrecognized as a leading cause of death among American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/ANs). Published studies of cancer incidence, cancer mortality, and cancer survival are highlighted to present an overview on the epidemiology of cancer among Native peoples. Cancer incidence and mortality have demonstrated steady increases among AI/ANs during a relatively limited time frame, as well as unique patterns of site-specific cancers. Cancer-survival data reveal that Native peoples have the poorest survival of any racial group for all cancer sites combined and for eight of the ten leading sites. Opportunities to educate health care providers, through continuing medical education programs and focused conferences for postdoctoral and current medical trainees, can be used to enhance cultural sensitivity and to examine ethnic differences in cancer patterns. Enhancement of recognition of the unique cancer patterns among AI/AN populations may lead to improved identification of at-risk individuals and more effective cancer screening programs within Native communities.
PubMed ID
10328320 View in PubMed
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A meta-analysis of cancer incidence in United States and Canadian native populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature226302
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1991 Jun;20(2):323-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1991
Author
M C Mahoney
A M Michalek
Author Affiliation
Bureau of Cancer Epidemiology, New York State Department of Health, Albany 12237-0683.
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1991 Jun;20(2):323-7
Date
Jun-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Indians, North American
Male
Meta-Analysis as Topic
Neoplasms - epidemiology
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
A meta-analytic approach was used to summarize studies of cancer incidence among Native populations in the United States and Canada. Native males and females were found to have a significantly lower incidence of cancer for all sites combined. Among Native males, kidney cancer was found to exhibit significantly elevated incidence, while significantly lower incidence was found for cancers of the colon, lung, and prostate, and for lymphomas and leukaemias. Native females were found to have significantly elevated incidence for cancers of the gallbladder, cervix, and kidney, while significantly decreased incidence was found for cancers of the colon, breast and uterus, and for lymphomas. The use of meta-analysis to integrate the findings from these studies allowed the identification of subtle differences in cancer incidence. Although these findings are not definitive, they overcome the limited numbers of site-specific cancers reported in many previous studies and are suggestive of general patterns of cancer incidence among Native populations. In addition, these results may be useful in indicating directions for future research involving specific cancer sites with elevated incidence.
PubMed ID
1833348 View in PubMed
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Native American Cancer Conference III. Cognitive correlates and impressions of attendees.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4038
Source
Cancer. 1996 Oct 1;78(7 Suppl):1533-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1-1996
Author
M C Mahoney
A M Michalek
C L Wiggins
M. Tenney
D. Bad Wound
L. Burhansstipanov
Author Affiliation
Department of Educational Affairs, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York 14263, USA.
Source
Cancer. 1996 Oct 1;78(7 Suppl):1533-7
Date
Oct-1-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alaska
American Samoa - ethnology
Attitude of Health Personnel
Data Collection
Ethnic Groups
Female
Hawaii - ethnology
Health services
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Inuits - psychology
Knowledge
Male
Neoplasms - ethnology - psychology
Oceanic Ancestry Group
United States
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The results of preconference and postconference surveys, as well as conference evaluation forms, distributed to attendees at the "Native American Cancer Conference III: Risk Factors, Outreach and Intervention Strategies," Seattle, Washington, June 16-19, 1995, are presented. METHODS: Conference attendees were requested to complete a multi-item survey designed to assess knowledge and perceptions relating to cancer among native peoples at the beginning and end of the conference. The evaluation instrument solicited qualitative impressions of the conference. RESULTS: Survey respondents were predominantly female (70%), and approximately half were native persons representing 48 different American Indian and Alaska Native communities. Knowledge levels were generally high at baseline for most items relating to cancer, with evidence of significant improvement for several items on the postconference survey. The majority of respondents believed that cancer was of equal importance compared with other health problems and that cancer services for American Indians and Alaska Natives are generally less extensive compared with the majority population; there was no evidence of opinion change noted in the postconference survey. Results from the qualitative evaluation expressed the unique and affirmative experiences among participants in terms of the social, cultural, and informational sharing that occurred. CONCLUSIONS: It is hoped that the positive experiences of conference attendees will serve to stimulate the organization of similar programs and the design of research projects that both assess and expand cancer control services among Native peoples.
PubMed ID
8839566 View in PubMed
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Provision of cancer control services to Native Americans by state health departments.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4107
Source
J Cancer Educ. 1994;9(3):145-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Author
A M Michalek
M C Mahoney
Author Affiliation
Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York 14263.
Source
J Cancer Educ. 1994;9(3):145-7
Date
1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cross-Sectional Studies
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Indians, North American
Inuits
Neoplasms - mortality - prevention & control
Preventive Health Services
Public Health Administration
Questionnaires
Teaching Materials
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
To examine the extent of cancer prevention and control programs for American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) tribal groups directly supported by state public health agencies, a cross-sectional survey was completed by chronic disease directors in 50 states. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize responses. Sixteen states (32%) reported having sponsored/directly supported cancer prevention and cancer control services specifically targeted to AI/AN populations. Few state public health agencies had developed culturally-relevant cancer education materials for AI/ANs. Although the respondents directed chronic disease or cancer prevention/control programs in their states, many were unfamiliar with cancer patterns or general health problems among AI/ANs. Survey results indicate that cancer prevention and control services are available to AI/AN populations through most state public health agencies. It is hoped that dissemination of survey results will increase awareness of cancer as a health problem among AI/ANs and lead to an expansion of the services available to this "invisible minority" to levels accessible by the majority population.
PubMed ID
7811601 View in PubMed
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Tribal-based cancer control activities among Alaska Natives: services and perceptions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4052
Source
Alaska Med. 1996 Apr-Jun;38(2):59-64, 83
Publication Type
Article
Author
A M Michalek
M C Mahoney
M. Papas
M. Tenney
L. Burhansstipanov
Author Affiliation
Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, USA.
Source
Alaska Med. 1996 Apr-Jun;38(2):59-64, 83
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology
Community Health Services
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Incidence
Inuits
Male
Neoplasms - ethnology - prevention & control
Preventive Medicine
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk factors
Abstract
Cancer has become a significant health problem in American Indian and Alaskan Native (AI/AN) communities. Despite the precipitous rise in cancer rates, limited data are available concerning cancer control services operative in these communities. To address this issue, a cross-sectional survey of all federally recognized tribes was undertaken to ascertain the breadth of cancer control activities offered and Tribal Health Directors perceptions of and priorities ascribed to cancer. This article presents responses given by AN Health Directors juxtaposed to those proffered by AI Health Directors. Nearly three-quarters (71%) of respondents perceived cancer rates to be increasing. Cancer was found to rank third, fifth among AI Health Directors, among seven health conditions when Directors were asked to rank their Tribe's commitment to confronting each one. Awareness of cancer as a public health concern coupled with competing health problems relegates cancer control activities to a lower priority. Findings underscore the need to elevate the issue of cancer in Indian Country as well as to educate investigators to become more sensitive and responsive to other Tribal health issues.
PubMed ID
8712301 View in PubMed
Less detail

Tribal-based cancer control activities. Services and perceptions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4035
Source
Cancer. 1996 Oct 1;78(7 Suppl):1574-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1-1996
Author
A M Michalek
M C Mahoney
D. Tome
M. Tenney
L. Burhansstipanov
Author Affiliation
Department of Educational Affairs, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY 14263, USA.
Source
Cancer. 1996 Oct 1;78(7 Suppl):1574-7
Date
Oct-1-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology
Health Care Surveys
Health Priorities
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology - prevention & control
United States - epidemiology
United States Indian Health Service
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Cancer is becoming a significant health problem for American Indians and Alaska Natives. Despite the precipitous increase in cancer rates in these populations, limited data are available regarding the extent of cancer control services available in these communities. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey of tribal health directors of all federally recognized tribes was undertaken to discover the breadth of cancer control activities offered and directors' perceptions of and priorities ascribed to cancer. RESULTS: Little more than half (53%) of respondents perceived cancer rates to be increasing. Cancer was found to rank fifth among seven health conditions when directors were asked to rank their tribe's commitment to confronting each. Lower relative levels of awareness of cancer patterns coupled with competing health problems relegated cancer control activities to low-priority issues. CONCLUSIONS: Findings from this study underscore the need to elevate the issue of cancer in Indian Country and to educate investigators to become more sensitive and responsive to other tribal health issues.
PubMed ID
8839573 View in PubMed
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10 records – page 1 of 1.