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The AGES-Reykjavik Study suggests that change in kidney measures is associated with subclinical brain pathology in older community-dwelling persons.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292670
Source
Kidney Int. 2018 Jun 27; :
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-27-2018
Author
Sanaz Sedaghat
Jie Ding
Gudny Eiriksdottir
Mark A van Buchem
Sigurdur Sigurdsson
M Arfan Ikram
Osorio Meirelles
Vilmundur Gudnason
Andrew S Levey
Lenore J Launer
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands; Department of Preventive Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois, USA.
Source
Kidney Int. 2018 Jun 27; :
Date
Jun-27-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Decreased glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and albuminuria may be accompanied by brain pathology. Here we investigated whether changes in these kidney measures are linked to development of new MRI-detected infarcts and microbleeds, and progression of white matter hyperintensity volume. The study included 2671 participants from the population-based AGES-Reykjavik Study (mean age 75, 58.7% women). GFR was estimated from serum creatinine, and albuminuria was assessed by urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio. Brain MRI was acquired at baseline (2002-2006) and 5 years later (2007-2011). New MRI-detected infarcts and microbleeds were counted on the follow-up scans. White matter hyperintensity progression was estimated as percent change in white matter hyperintensity volumes between the two exams. Participants with a large eGFR decline (over 3 ml/min per 1.73m2 per year) had more incident subcortical infarcts (odds ratio 1.53; 95% confidence interval 1.05, 2.22), and more marked progression of white matter hyperintensity volume (difference: 8%; 95% confidence interval: 4%, 12%), compared to participants without a large decline. Participants with incident albuminuria (over 30 mg/g) had 21% more white matter hyperintensity volume progression (95% confidence interval: 14%, 29%) and 1.86 higher odds of developing new deep microbleeds (95% confidence interval 1.16, 2.98), compared to participants without incident albuminuria. The findings were independent of cardiovascular risk factors. Changes in kidney measures were not associated with occurrence of cortical infarcts. Thus, larger changes in eGFR and albuminuria are associated with increased risk for developing manifestations of cerebral small vessel disease. Individuals with larger changes in these kidney measures should be considered as a high risk population for accelerated brain pathology.
PubMed ID
29960746 View in PubMed
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The AGES-Reykjavik Study suggests that change in kidney measures is associated with subclinical brain pathology in older community-dwelling persons.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300494
Source
Kidney Int. 2018 09; 94(3):608-615
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
09-2018
Author
Sanaz Sedaghat
Jie Ding
Gudny Eiriksdottir
Mark A van Buchem
Sigurdur Sigurdsson
M Arfan Ikram
Osorio Meirelles
Vilmundur Gudnason
Andrew S Levey
Lenore J Launer
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands; Department of Preventive Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois, USA.
Source
Kidney Int. 2018 09; 94(3):608-615
Date
09-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Albuminuria - physiopathology - urine
Cerebral Small Vessel Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology
Creatinine - urine
Disease Progression
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Glomerular Filtration Rate - physiology
Humans
Incidence
Independent living
Kidney - physiopathology
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Prospective Studies
Renal Insufficiency, Chronic - physiopathology - urine
Risk factors
Serum Albumin
White Matter - diagnostic imaging - pathology
Abstract
Decreased glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and albuminuria may be accompanied by brain pathology. Here we investigated whether changes in these kidney measures are linked to development of new MRI-detected infarcts and microbleeds, and progression of white matter hyperintensity volume. The study included 2671 participants from the population-based AGES-Reykjavik Study (mean age 75, 58.7% women). GFR was estimated from serum creatinine, and albuminuria was assessed by urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio. Brain MRI was acquired at baseline (2002-2006) and 5 years later (2007-2011). New MRI-detected infarcts and microbleeds were counted on the follow-up scans. White matter hyperintensity progression was estimated as percent change in white matter hyperintensity volumes between the two exams. Participants with a large eGFR decline (over 3 ml/min/1.73m2 per year) had more incident subcortical infarcts (odds ratio 1.53; 95% confidence interval 1.05, 2.22), and more marked progression of white matter hyperintensity volume (difference: 8%; 95% confidence interval: 4%, 12%), compared to participants without a large decline. Participants with incident albuminuria (over 30 mg/g) had 21% more white matter hyperintensity volume progression (95% confidence interval: 14%, 29%) and 1.86 higher odds of developing new deep microbleeds (95% confidence interval 1.16, 2.98), compared to participants without incident albuminuria. The findings were independent of cardiovascular risk factors. Changes in kidney measures were not associated with occurrence of cortical infarcts. Thus, larger changes in eGFR and albuminuria are associated with increased risk for developing manifestations of cerebral small vessel disease. Individuals with larger changes in these kidney measures should be considered as a high risk population for accelerated brain pathology.
PubMed ID
29960746 View in PubMed
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Association of metformin, sulfonylurea and insulin use with brain structure and function and risk of dementia and Alzheimer's disease: Pooled analysis from 5 cohorts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298160
Source
PLoS One. 2019; 14(2):e0212293
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2019
Author
Galit Weinstein
Kendra L Davis-Plourde
Sarah Conner
Jayandra J Himali
Alexa S Beiser
Anne Lee
Andreea M Rawlings
Sanaz Sedaghat
Jie Ding
Erin Moshier
Cornelia M van Duijn
Michal S Beeri
Elizabeth Selvin
M Arfan Ikram
Lenore J Launer
Mary N Haan
Sudha Seshadri
Author Affiliation
School of Public Health, University of Haifa, Haifa, Israel.
Source
PLoS One. 2019; 14(2):e0212293
Date
2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
To determine whether classes of diabetes medications are associated with cognitive health and dementia risk, above and beyond their glycemic control properties.
Findings were pooled from 5 population-based cohorts: the Framingham Heart Study, the Rotterdam Study, the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study, the Aging Gene-Environment Susceptibility-Reykjavik Study (AGES) and the Sacramento Area Latino Study on Aging (SALSA). Differences between users and non-users of insulin, metformin and sulfonylurea were assessed in each cohort for cognitive and brain MRI measures using linear regression models, and cognitive decline and dementia/AD risk using mixed effect models and Cox regression analyses, respectively. Findings were then pooled using meta-analytic techniques, including 3,590 individuals with diabetes for the prospective analysis.
After adjusting for potential confounders including indices of glycemic control, insulin use was associated with increased risk of new-onset dementia (pooled HR (95% CI) = 1.58 (1.18, 2.12);p = 0.002) and with a greater decline in global cognitive function (ß = -0.014±0.007;p = 0.045). The associations with incident dementia remained similar after further adjustment for renal function and excluding persons with diabetes whose treatment was life-style change only. Insulin use was not related to cognitive function nor to brain MRI measures. No significant associations were found between metformin or sulfonylurea use and outcomes of brain function and structure. There was no evidence of significant between-study heterogeneity.
Despite its advantages in controlling glycemic dysregulation and preventing complications, insulin treatment may be associated with increased adverse cognitive outcomes possibly due to a greater risk of hypoglycemia.
PubMed ID
30768625 View in PubMed
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Common variation in PHACTR1 is associated with susceptibility to cervical artery dissection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261062
Source
Nat Genet. 2015 Jan;47(1):78-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2015
Author
Stéphanie Debette
Yoichiro Kamatani
Tiina M Metso
Manja Kloss
Ganesh Chauhan
Stefan T Engelter
Alessandro Pezzini
Vincent Thijs
Hugh S Markus
Martin Dichgans
Christiane Wolf
Ralf Dittrich
Emmanuel Touzé
Andrew M Southerland
Yves Samson
Shérine Abboud
Yannick Béjot
Valeria Caso
Anna Bersano
Andreas Gschwendtner
Maria Sessa
John Cole
Chantal Lamy
Elisabeth Medeiros
Simone Beretta
Leo H Bonati
Armin J Grau
Patrik Michel
Jennifer J Majersik
Pankaj Sharma
Ludmila Kalashnikova
Maria Nazarova
Larisa Dobrynina
Eva Bartels
Benoit Guillon
Evita G van den Herik
Israel Fernandez-Cadenas
Katarina Jood
Michael A Nalls
Frank-Erik De Leeuw
Christina Jern
Yu-Ching Cheng
Inge Werner
Antti J Metso
Christoph Lichy
Philippe A Lyrer
Tobias Brandt
Giorgio B Boncoraglio
Heinz-Erich Wichmann
Christian Gieger
Andrew D Johnson
Thomas Böttcher
Maurizio Castellano
Dominique Arveiler
M Arfan Ikram
Monique M B Breteler
Alessandro Padovani
James F Meschia
Gregor Kuhlenbäumer
Arndt Rolfs
Bradford B Worrall
Erich-Bernd Ringelstein
Diana Zelenika
Turgut Tatlisumak
Mark Lathrop
Didier Leys
Philippe Amouyel
Jean Dallongeville
Source
Nat Genet. 2015 Jan;47(1):78-83
Date
Jan-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alleles
Brain Ischemia - epidemiology - genetics
Carotid Artery, Internal, Dissection - epidemiology - genetics
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Genetic Pleiotropy
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genome-Wide Association Study
Humans
Hypercholesterolemia - epidemiology
Hypertension - epidemiology
Male
Microfilament Proteins - genetics - physiology
Middle Aged
Migraine Disorders - epidemiology
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology
Obesity - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Risk factors
Vertebral Artery Dissection - epidemiology - genetics
Abstract
Cervical artery dissection (CeAD), a mural hematoma in a carotid or vertebral artery, is a major cause of ischemic stroke in young adults although relatively uncommon in the general population (incidence of 2.6/100,000 per year). Minor cervical traumas, infection, migraine and hypertension are putative risk factors, and inverse associations with obesity and hypercholesterolemia are described. No confirmed genetic susceptibility factors have been identified using candidate gene approaches. We performed genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in 1,393 CeAD cases and 14,416 controls. The rs9349379[G] allele (PHACTR1) was associated with lower CeAD risk (odds ratio (OR) = 0.75, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.69-0.82; P = 4.46 × 10(-10)), with confirmation in independent follow-up samples (659 CeAD cases and 2,648 controls; P = 3.91 × 10(-3); combined P = 1.00 × 10(-11)). The rs9349379[G] allele was previously shown to be associated with lower risk of migraine and increased risk of myocardial infarction. Deciphering the mechanisms underlying this pleiotropy might provide important information on the biological underpinnings of these disabling conditions.
PubMed ID
25420145 View in PubMed
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Rare Functional Variant in TM2D3 is Associated with Late-Onset Alzheimer's Disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282468
Source
PLoS Genet. 2016 Oct;12(10):e1006327
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2016
Author
Johanna Jakobsdottir
Sven J van der Lee
Joshua C Bis
Vincent Chouraki
David Li-Kroeger
Shinya Yamamoto
Megan L Grove
Adam Naj
Maria Vronskaya
Jose L Salazar
Anita L DeStefano
Jennifer A Brody
Albert V Smith
Najaf Amin
Rebecca Sims
Carla A Ibrahim-Verbaas
Seung-Hoan Choi
Claudia L Satizabal
Oscar L Lopez
Alexa Beiser
M Arfan Ikram
Melissa E Garcia
Caroline Hayward
Tibor V Varga
Samuli Ripatti
Paul W Franks
Göran Hallmans
Olov Rolandsson
Jan-Håkon Jansson
David J Porteous
Veikko Salomaa
Gudny Eiriksdottir
Kenneth M Rice
Hugo J Bellen
Daniel Levy
Andre G Uitterlinden
Valur Emilsson
Jerome I Rotter
Thor Aspelund
Christopher J O'Donnell
Annette L Fitzpatrick
Lenore J Launer
Albert Hofman
Li-San Wang
Julie Williams
Gerard D Schellenberg
Eric Boerwinkle
Bruce M Psaty
Sudha Seshadri
Joshua M Shulman
Vilmundur Gudnason
Cornelia M van Duijn
Source
PLoS Genet. 2016 Oct;12(10):e1006327
Date
Oct-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age of Onset
Aged
Alleles
Alzheimer Disease - genetics - pathology
Amyloid beta-Protein Precursor - genetics
Animals
Apolipoproteins E - genetics
Drosophila Proteins - genetics
Drosophila melanogaster - genetics
European Continental Ancestry Group
Exome - genetics
Female
Genome-Wide Association Study
Genomics
Humans
Iceland
Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins - genetics
Male
Membrane Proteins - genetics
Mutation
Phenotype
Receptors, Notch - genetics
Tropomyosin - genetics
Abstract
We performed an exome-wide association analysis in 1393 late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD) cases and 8141 controls from the CHARGE consortium. We found that a rare variant (P155L) in TM2D3 was enriched in Icelanders (~0.5% versus
Notes
Erratum In: PLoS Genet. 2016 Nov 28;12 (11):e100645627893753
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PubMed ID
27764101 View in PubMed
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The Stroke Riskometer(TM) App: validation of a data collection tool and stroke risk predictor.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269898
Source
Int J Stroke. 2015 Feb;10(2):231-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2015
Author
Priya Parmar
Rita Krishnamurthi
M Arfan Ikram
Albert Hofman
Saira S Mirza
Yury Varakin
Michael Kravchenko
Michael Piradov
Amanda G Thrift
Bo Norrving
Wenzhi Wang
Dipes Kumar Mandal
Suzanne Barker-Collo
Ramesh Sahathevan
Stephen Davis
Gustavo Saposnik
Miia Kivipelto
Shireen Sindi
Natan M Bornstein
Maurice Giroud
Yannick Béjot
Michael Brainin
Richie Poulton
K M Venkat Narayan
Manuel Correia
António Freire
Yoshihiro Kokubo
David Wiebers
George Mensah
Nasser F BinDhim
P Alan Barber
Jeyaraj Durai Pandian
Graeme J Hankey
Man Mohan Mehndiratta
Shobhana Azhagammal
Norlinah Mohd Ibrahim
Max Abbott
Elaine Rush
Patria Hume
Tasleem Hussein
Rohit Bhattacharjee
Mitali Purohit
Valery L Feigin
Source
Int J Stroke. 2015 Feb;10(2):231-44
Date
Feb-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Algorithms
Calibration
Data Collection - methods
Humans
Mobile Applications
Netherlands
New Zealand
Prognosis
Risk
Risk factors
Russia
Sensitivity and specificity
Stroke - diagnosis
Abstract
The greatest potential to reduce the burden of stroke is by primary prevention of first-ever stroke, which constitutes three quarters of all stroke. In addition to population-wide prevention strategies (the 'mass' approach), the 'high risk' approach aims to identify individuals at risk of stroke and to modify their risk factors, and risk, accordingly. Current methods of assessing and modifying stroke risk are difficult to access and implement by the general population, amongst whom most future strokes will arise. To help reduce the burden of stroke on individuals and the population a new app, the Stroke Riskometer(TM) , has been developed. We aim to explore the validity of the app for predicting the risk of stroke compared with current best methods.
752 stroke outcomes from a sample of 9501 individuals across three countries (New Zealand, Russia and the Netherlands) were utilized to investigate the performance of a novel stroke risk prediction tool algorithm (Stroke Riskometer(TM) ) compared with two established stroke risk score prediction algorithms (Framingham Stroke Risk Score [FSRS] and QStroke). We calculated the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves and area under the ROC curve (AUROC) with 95% confidence intervals, Harrels C-statistic and D-statistics for measure of discrimination, R(2) statistics to indicate level of variability accounted for by each prediction algorithm, the Hosmer-Lemeshow statistic for calibration, and the sensitivity and specificity of each algorithm.
The Stroke Riskometer(TM) performed well against the FSRS five-year AUROC for both males (FSRS?= 75.0% (95% CI 72.3%-77.6%), Stroke Riskometer(TM) = 74.0(95% CI 71.3%-76.7%) and females [FSRS?= 70.3% (95% CI 67.9%-72.8%, Stroke Riskometer(TM) ?= 71.5% (95% CI 69.0%-73.9%)], and better than QStroke [males - 59.7% (95% CI 57.3%-62.0%) and comparable to females = 71.1% (95% CI 69.0%-73.1%)]. Discriminative ability of all algorithms was low (C-statistic ranging from 0.51-0.56, D-statistic ranging from 0.01-0.12). Hosmer-Lemeshow illustrated that all of the predicted risk scores were not well calibrated with the observed event data (P
Notes
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PubMed ID
25491651 View in PubMed
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Trends in the Incidence of Parkinson Disease in the General Population: The Rotterdam Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283056
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2016 Jun 01;183(11):1018-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-01-2016
Author
Sirwan K L Darweesh
Peter J Koudstaal
Bruno H Stricker
Albert Hofman
M Arfan Ikram
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2016 Jun 01;183(11):1018-26
Date
Jun-01-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antipsychotic Agents - administration & dosage
Coffee
Comorbidity
Dementia - epidemiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Health Behavior
Humans
Hypolipidemic Agents - administration & dosage
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Parkinson disease - epidemiology
Parkinson Disease, Secondary - epidemiology
Parkinsonian Disorders - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Smoking - epidemiology
Stroke - epidemiology
Abstract
We investigated trends in the incidence of parkinsonism and Parkinson disease (PD) by comparing data from the first 2 subcohorts of the Rotterdam Study, a prospective, population-based cohort study (first subcohort: baseline 1990 with 10 years of follow-up; second subcohort, baseline 2000 with 10 years of follow-up). From the baseline years, we observed differences in the second subcohort that were associated with a lower risk of PD for some but not all baseline risk factors. Participants in both subcohorts were followed for a maximum of 10 years and monitored for the onset of parkinsonism, the onset of dementia, or death, until January 1, 2011. We used Poisson regression models to compare the incidences of parkinsonism, both overall and by cause (PD and secondary causes), and competitive events (incident dementia and death) as well as the mortality of parkinsonism patients in the 2 subcohorts. In the 1990 subcohort, there were 182 cases of parkinsonism (84 of which were PD) during 57,052 person-years. In the 2000 subcohort, we observed 28 cases of parkinsonism (10 with PD) during 22,307 person-years. The overall age- and sex-adjusted incidence of parkinsonism was lower in the 2000 subcohort (incidence rate ratio = 0.55, 95% confidence interval: 0.36, 0.81), and PD incidence declined sharply (incidence rate ratio = 0.39, 95% confidence interval: 0.19, 0.72). Competitive event rates were lower in the 2000 subcohort, and mortality rates among persons with parkinsonism remained stable. These findings suggest that the incidence of parkinsonism in general, and of PD in particular, decreased between 1990 and 2011.
PubMed ID
27188952 View in PubMed
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Variant of TREM2 associated with the risk of Alzheimer's disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118991
Source
N Engl J Med. 2013 Jan 10;368(2):107-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-10-2013
Author
Thorlakur Jonsson
Hreinn Stefansson
Stacy Steinberg
Ingileif Jonsdottir
Palmi V Jonsson
Jon Snaedal
Sigurbjorn Bjornsson
Johanna Huttenlocher
Allan I Levey
James J Lah
Dan Rujescu
Harald Hampel
Ina Giegling
Ole A Andreassen
Knut Engedal
Ingun Ulstein
Srdjan Djurovic
Carla Ibrahim-Verbaas
Albert Hofman
M Arfan Ikram
Cornelia M van Duijn
Unnur Thorsteinsdottir
Augustine Kong
Kari Stefansson
Author Affiliation
deCODE Genetics, Reykjavik, Iceland.
Source
N Engl J Med. 2013 Jan 10;368(2):107-16
Date
Jan-10-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - genetics
Apolipoprotein E4 - genetics
Case-Control Studies
Cognition
Genetic Variation
Genotyping Techniques
Heterozygote
Humans
Iceland
Membrane Glycoproteins - genetics
Mutation, Missense
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Receptors, Immunologic - genetics
Risk factors
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Abstract
Sequence variants, including the e4 allele of apolipoprotein E, have been associated with the risk of the common late-onset form of Alzheimer's disease. Few rare variants affecting the risk of late-onset Alzheimer's disease have been found.
We obtained the genome sequences of 2261 Icelanders and identified sequence variants that were likely to affect protein function. We imputed these variants into the genomes of patients with Alzheimer's disease and control participants and then tested for an association with Alzheimer's disease. We performed replication tests using case-control series from the United States, Norway, The Netherlands, and Germany. We also tested for a genetic association with cognitive function in a population of unaffected elderly persons.
A rare missense mutation (rs75932628-T) in the gene encoding the triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 2 (TREM2), which was predicted to result in an R47H substitution, was found to confer a significant risk of Alzheimer's disease in Iceland (odds ratio, 2.92; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.09 to 4.09; P=3.42?10(-10)). The mutation had a frequency of 0.46% in controls 85 years of age or older. We observed the association in additional sample sets (odds ratio, 2.90; 95% CI, 2.16 to 3.91; P=2.1?10(-12) in combined discovery and replication samples). We also found that carriers of rs75932628-T between the ages of 80 and 100 years without Alzheimer's disease had poorer cognitive function than noncarriers (P=0.003).
Our findings strongly implicate variant TREM2 in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Given the reported antiinflammatory role of TREM2 in the brain, the R47H substitution may lead to an increased predisposition to Alzheimer's disease through impaired containment of inflammatory processes. (Funded by the National Institute on Aging and others.).
Notes
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PubMed ID
23150908 View in PubMed
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