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12 records – page 1 of 2.

Foodborne bacterial infection and hospitalization: a registry-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature83409
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2006 Feb 15;42(4):498-506
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-15-2006
Author
Helms Morten
Simonsen Jacob
Mølbak Kåre
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology Research, Danish Epidemiology Science Center, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2006 Feb 15;42(4):498-506
Date
Feb-15-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Campylobacter Infections - epidemiology - etiology
Child, Preschool
Denmark - epidemiology
Enterobacteriaceae Infections - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Food Microbiology
Food Poisoning - epidemiology - microbiology
Gastroenteritis - epidemiology - microbiology
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Registries
Risk
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Foodborne bacterial gastrointestinal infections are important causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide, and despite successful control programs in some developed countries, these infections continue to have a major impact on public health and economy. METHODS: On the basis of data from 3 national registries, we determined short- and long-term risks of hospitalization due to gastroenteritis, short-term complications, and long-term sequelae after infections with nontyphoid Salmonella enterica, Campylobacter species, Yersinia enterocolitica, diarrheagenic Escherichia coli, and Shigella species. RESULTS: Among 52,121 patients, 7524 (14.4%) were hospitalized with a diagnosis of gastroenteritis within 90 days after microbiological diagnosis. A total of 4941 patients (17.7%) with infections due to S. enterica and 1937 (10.8%) with infections due to Campylobacter species were admitted to the hospital. Complications, such as gastrointestinal perforation and invasive illness, occurred in 647 patients (1.2%). The risk of invasive illness was > 6-fold higher in patients with infections due to S. enterica (odds ratio [OR] compared with the general population, 30.3; 95% confidence interval [CI], 26.2-35.1) than in those with infections due to Campylobacter species (OR, 4.9; 95% CI, 3.5-6.8) (P
Notes
ReprintIn: Ugeskr Laeger. 2007 Feb 26;169(9):820-317355849
PubMed ID
16421794 View in PubMed
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[Infectious diseases and climate change]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95348
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2009 Oct 26;171(44):3178-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-26-2009
Author
Valentiner-Branth Palle
Glismann Steffen Offersen
Mølbak Kåre
Author Affiliation
Statens Serum Institut, Epidemiologisk Afdeling, DK-2300 København S, Denmark.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2009 Oct 26;171(44):3178-81
Date
Oct-26-2009
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Bacterial Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control - transmission
Climate
Communicable disease control
Denmark - epidemiology
Disease Vectors
Europe - epidemiology
Food Microbiology
Greenhouse Effect
Humans
Insect Vectors
Risk factors
Rodentia
Virus Diseases - epidemiology - prevention & control - transmission
Water Microbiology
Abstract
Climate changes will likely have an impact on the spectrum of infectious diseases in Europe. We may see an increase in vector-borne diseases, diseases spread by rodents such as Hantavirus, and food- and water-borne diseases. As the effects of climate changes are likely to occur gradually, a modern industrialised country such as Denmark will have the opportunity to adapt to the expected changes.
PubMed ID
19857396 View in PubMed
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Intussusception in early childhood: a cohort study of 1.7 million children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30159
Source
Pediatrics. 2004 Sep;114(3):782-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2004
Author
Thea Kølsen Fischer
Kristine Bihrmann
Michael Perch
Anders Koch
Jan Wohlfahrt
Mølbak Kåre
Mads Melbye
Author Affiliation
Division of Viral and Rickettsial Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Rd, MS-A34, Atlanta, GA 30333, USA. thf7@cdc.gov
Source
Pediatrics. 2004 Sep;114(3):782-5
Date
Sep-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data - trends
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Intussusception - epidemiology
Male
Poisson Distribution
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Distribution
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To describe incidence and temporal trends of intussusceptions in Danish children during 1980 to 2001. METHODS: A population-based cohort study was conducted of 1.67 million children who were younger than 5 years during 1980 to 2001 and were followed up for 6.66 million person-years. The Danish National Patient Registry was used to identify cases of intussusception in the cohort. Age-specific incidence rates were main outcome measure. RESULTS: A total of 1814 cases of intussusception among children who were younger than 5 years were reported from 1980 to 2001. The incidence rate remained fairly constant during 1980 to 1990 but decreased by 55% (95% confidence interval: 43%-65%) from 1990 to 2001. The reduction was most pronounced among children aged 3 to 5 months. CONCLUSIONS: The incidence of intussusception among Danish children declined significantly during the 1990s, particularly among infants 3 to 5 months of age.
PubMed ID
15342854 View in PubMed
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Lack of association between group B meningococcal disease and autoimmune disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature84338
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2007 Nov 15;45(10):1327-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-2007
Author
Howitz Michael
Krause Tyra Grove
Simonsen Jacob Brunbjerg
Hoffmann Steen
Frisch Morten
Nielsen Nete Munk
Robbins John
Schneerson Rachel
Mølbak Kåre
Miller Mark A
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark. how@ssi.dk
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2007 Nov 15;45(10):1327-34
Date
Nov-15-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Autoimmune Diseases - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Meningitis, Meningococcal - complications
Middle Aged
Neisseria meningitidis, Serogroup B - immunology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The capsular polysaccharide of group B meningococci (GBM) is structurally identical to a polysaccharide found on neural cell adhesion molecules in humans. This structural identity has raised concern that a vaccine based on the GBM capsular polysaccharide might induce autoimmune disease in vaccinated persons. Because systemic infection with GBM induces serum antibody in adults, we investigated whether persons with a history of GBM disease are at increased risk of developing autoimmune diseases. METHODS: The entire Danish population constituted our study cohort of 7,467,001 individuals, who were observed for autoimmune diseases from 1977 through 2004. At-risk years were counted as the number of uninfected years prior to the first recorded diagnosis of meningococcal disease but changed to person-years at risk at the diagnosis of GBM disease (2984 subjects) or group C meningococcal disease (914 patients). Ratios of incidence rates of autoimmune disease served as measures of the relative risk. RESULTS: Persons with a history of GBM disease experienced a total of 37,290 person-years at risk, ranging from 11 days to 31 years at risk after the onset of GBM disease, during which 49 cases of autoimmune disease occurred. Persons with GBM disease had no increased risk of autoimmune diseases, either compared with persons with a history of group C meningococcal disease (incidence rate ratio, 0.9; 95% confidence interval, 0.5-1.4) or compared with persons without a history of meningococcal disease (incidence rate ratio, 1.1; 95% confidence interval, 0.8-1.5). CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that invasive disease caused by GBM is not associated with autoimmune diseases in humans for up to 31 years after meningococcal disease and should lessen concerns regarding the development of a capsular-based GBM vaccine.
PubMed ID
17968829 View in PubMed
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National case-control study on risk of death and Neisseria meningitidis sequence types in Denmark, 2000-2007.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90514
Source
APMIS. 2008 Dec;116(12):1107-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Howitz Michael
Lambertsen Lotte
Mølbak Kåre
Christensen Jens Jørgen
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark. how@ssi.dk
Source
APMIS. 2008 Dec;116(12):1107-15
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child, Preschool
DNA, Bacterial - genetics
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Meningococcal Infections - mortality
Middle Aged
Neisseria meningitidis - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Risk factors
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Serotyping
Young Adult
Abstract
In the past decades efforts to further diminish the case-fatality rate from meningococcal disease have proven challenging due to the often rapid progression of the disease in patients. In this study our objective was to characterise a subset of Neisseria meningitidis isolates to establish which sequence types were associated with increased mortality in Denmark during the period 2000-2007. We designed a matched case control and performed serogrouping, serotyping, serosubtyping and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) on 100 isolates. The clonal complex ST-32/ET-5 was found in 36% of the isolates, followed by the ST-11/ET-37 complex (14%) and ST-41/44 complex/Lineage 3 (14%). Eight new sequence types were found. None of the clonal complexes were significantly associated with increased mortality. Phenotype B:15:P1.7,16 tended to be a better predictor of death than ST-32. Although the numbers were low, the present study indicates that phenotyping may be a better predictor of mortality than MLST, which suggests that each typing method has its advantages and disadvantages. If this notion can be confirmed by other studies, it may stimulate additional research regarding the pathogenesis of severe illness, for example, if certain surface molecules trigger a cytokine storm more than others.
PubMed ID
19133014 View in PubMed
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Risk of adverse birth outcome after group B meningococcal disease: results from a Danish national cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90320
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2009 Mar;28(3):199-203
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009
Author
Howitz Michael F
Simonsen Jacob
Krause Tyra Grove
Robbins John B
Schneerson Rachel
Mølbak Kåre
Miller Mark A
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark. how@ssi.dk
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2009 Mar;28(3):199-203
Date
Mar-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cohort Studies
Congenital Abnormalities - epidemiology - etiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Meningococcal Infections - complications - epidemiology - microbiology
Neisseria meningitidis, Serogroup B
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious - microbiology
Pregnancy outcome
Registries
Risk
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Group B meningococcal (GBM) disease induces antibodies that react in vitro with neural cell adhesion molecules in fetal brain tissue. Because IgG antibodies to GBM cross the placenta, the authors investigated whether women with a previous GBM disease had an increased risk of giving birth to preterm or to stillborn infants and whether the live-born children had an increased risk of birth defects. METHODS: Data were obtained from 4 national registries in the period 1974-2005 to form 2 cohorts: (1) 1422 women with confirmed GBM disease, and (2) their 502 firstborn children. RESULTS: Overall, there was no increased risk of preterm or stillbirths among the first cohort. Among the children, there was no increased risk of being born small for the gestational age, having birth defects (OR: 1.00; 95% CI: 0.53-1.90), diseases of the nervous system (HR: 0.38; 95% CI: 0.08-1.74), or any diseases within the first 3 years of life (HR: 1.06; 95% CI: 0.78-1.45) compared to births from a reference population with prior group C meningococcal disease. CONCLUSIONS: The results do not support the proposal that GBM is associated with immunoreactive disease that may affect the health of the offspring and are consistent with previous findings that GBM disease is not associated with an increased risk of autoimmune disease.
PubMed ID
19165135 View in PubMed
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Surgery and risk of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in Denmark and Sweden: registry-based case-control studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91715
Source
Neuroepidemiology. 2008;31(4):229-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Mahillo-Fernandez Ignacio
de Pedro-Cuesta Jesús
Bleda Maria José
Cruz Mabel
Mølbak Kåre
Laursen Henning
Falkenhorst Gerhard
Martínez-Martín Pablo
Siden Ake
Author Affiliation
Department of Applied Epidemiology, National Center for Epidemiology, and Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red sobre Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas (CIBERNED), Carlos III Institute of Health, Madrid, Spain.
Source
Neuroepidemiology. 2008;31(4):229-40
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blood Transfusion - adverse effects
Case-Control Studies
Creutzfeldt-Jakob Syndrome - epidemiology - mortality - surgery - transmission
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Prion Diseases - epidemiology - surgery
Reference Values
Registries
Surgical Procedures, Operative - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Survival Analysis
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Epidemiologic evidence of surgical transmission of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) remains controversial. METHODS: From Danish and Swedish registries we selected 167 definite and probable sCJD cases (with onset between 1987 and 2003) and 3,059 controls (835 age-, sex-, and residence-matched, and 2,224 unmatched). Independent of case/control status, surgical histories were obtained from National Hospital Discharge Registries. Surgical procedures were categorized by body system group and lag time to onset of sCJD. Exposure frequencies were compared using logistic regression. RESULTS: A history of any major surgery, conducted >/=20 years before sCJD onset, was more common in cases than both matched (OR = 2.44, 95% CI = 1.46-4.07) and unmatched controls (OR = 2.25, 95% CI = 1.48-3.44). This observation was corroborated by a linear increase in risk per surgical discharge (OR = 1.57, 95% CI = 1.13-2.18; OR = 1.50, 95% CI = 1.18-1.91). Surgery of various body systems, including peripheral vessels, digestive system and spleen, and female genital organs, was significantly associated with increased sCJD risk. CONCLUSIONS: A variety of major surgical procedures constitute a risk factor for sCJD following an incubation period of many years. A considerable number of sCJD cases may originate from health care-related accidental transmission.
Notes
Comment In: Neuroepidemiology. 2008;31(4):241-218843193
PubMed ID
18843192 View in PubMed
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Surveillance of bacterial meningitis in children under 2 y of age in Denmark, 1997-2006.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92388
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2008;40(11-12):881-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Howitz Michael
Hartvig Christiansen Annette
Harboe Zitta Barella
Mølbak Kåre
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Statens Serum Institute, Copenhagen, Denmark. how@ssi.dk
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2008;40(11-12):881-7
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Meningitis, Bacterial - epidemiology
Population Surveillance
Time Factors
Abstract
Worldwide the 3 most common pathogens for bacterial meningitis among infants and young children are Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Neisseria meningitidis. Denmark included in the National Childhood Vaccination Programme vaccination against H. influenzae type B (Hib) in 1993 and invasive pneumococcal disease as of October 2007. Introduction of the conjugated heptavalent pneumococcal vaccine is, as in the post-Hib vaccination era, expected to change the epidemiology of bacterial meningitis in infants and young children. In 1980 it became mandatory to report suspected cases of bacterial meningitis and the surveillance system was further enhanced for laboratory diagnosed cases of N. meningitis in 1992 and S. pneumoniae in 1996 when a reminder procedure to the physician was issued. In this article we review the epidemiology of 418 notified cases of bacterial meningitis in children
PubMed ID
18720256 View in PubMed
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12 records – page 1 of 2.