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[Can health claims made on food be scientifically substantiated? Review on satiety and weight management]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89551
Source
Laeknabladid. 2009 Mar;95(3):195-200
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009
Author
Gunnarsdottir Ingibjorg
Due Annette
Karhunen Leila
Lyly Marika
Author Affiliation
ingigun@landspitali.is
Source
Laeknabladid. 2009 Mar;95(3):195-200
Date
Mar-2009
Language
Icelandic
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Consumer Product Safety - legislation & jurisprudence
Dietary Fiber - administration & dosage
Dietary Proteins - administration & dosage
European Union
Evidence-Based Medicine
Food Labeling - legislation & jurisprudence
Government Regulation
Humans
Legislation, Food
Nutrition Policy
Nutritive Value
Obesity - diet therapy - physiopathology
Satiation
Treatment Outcome
Weight Loss
Abstract
Obesity is becoming an increasing health problem and results when energy intake exceeds energy expenditure. Food has a crucial role in weight management. The new EU legislation on nutrition and health claims permits the use of weight regulation and satiety related health claims on foods, if they are based on generally accepted scientific evidence. In this review the current knowledge on food properties, that have been proposed to affect satiety and/or energy expenditure and thus might be useful in weight control are considered, as part of the project "Substantiation of weight regulation and satiety related health claims on foods" funded by the Nordic Innovation Centre. At this point the scientific evidence of the short term effects of dietary fibers and proteins in relation to satiety seems to be convincing. However, it might be challenging to make product specific satiety and weight management claims as the dose response is not always known. On the other hand two step health claims might be applied, for example rich in dietary fibre - dietary fibre can increase satiety or rich in protein - protein can increase satiety.
PubMed ID
19318712 View in PubMed
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