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Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2009 Oct 26;171(44):3168-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-26-2009
Author
Loft Steffen
Author Affiliation
Institut for Folkesundhedsvidenskab, Afdeling for Miljø og Sundhed, Det Sundhedsvidenskabelige Fakultet, Københavns Universitet, Øster Farimagsgade 5, DK-1014 København K, Denmark. s.loft@pubhealth.ku.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2009 Oct 26;171(44):3168-71
Date
Oct-26-2009
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollution - adverse effects - analysis - prevention & control
Air Pollution, Indoor - adverse effects - analysis - prevention & control
Animals
Cattle
Climate
Greenhouse Effect
Health
Humans
Methane - analysis
Ozone - analysis
Particulate Matter - analysis
Pollen
Risk factors
World Health
Abstract
Air quality, health and climate change are closely connected. Ozone depends on temperature and the greenhouse gas methane from cattle and biomass. Pollen presence depends on temperature and CO2. The effect of climate change on particulate air pollution is complex, but the likely net effect is greater health risks. Reduction of greenhouse-gas emissions by reduced livestock production and use of combustion for energy production, transport and heating will also improve air quality. Energy savings in buildings and use of CO2 neutral fuels should not deteriorate indoor and outdoor air quality.
PubMed ID
19857393 View in PubMed
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Bulky DNA adducts as risk indicators of lung cancer in a Danish case-cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80246
Source
Int J Cancer. 2007 Jan 1;120(1):212-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1-2007

Experimentally determined human respiratory tract deposition of airborne particles at a busy street.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature94519
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2009 Jul 1;43(13):4659-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1-2009
Author
Löndahl Jakob
Massling Andreas
Swietlicki Erik
Bräuner Elvira Vaclavik
Ketzel Matthias
Pagels Joakim
Loft Steffen
Author Affiliation
Division of Nuclear Physics, Department of Physics, Lund University, PO Box 118, SE-221 00 Lund, Sweden. jakob.londahl@nuclear.lu.se
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2009 Jul 1;43(13):4659-64
Date
Jul-1-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aerosols
Aged
Air Pollutants - analysis
Air Pollution
Bioelectric Energy Sources
Cities
Denmark
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Equipment Design
Female
Humans
Inhalation Exposure
Male
Middle Aged
Respiratory System - drug effects
Vehicle Emissions
Abstract
Traffic is one of the major sources of harmful airborne particles worldwide. To relate exposure to adverse health effects it is important to determine the deposition probability of the inhaled particles in the human respiratory tract. The size-dependent deposition of 12-580 nm particles was measured with a novel setup in 9 healthy subjects breathing by mouth on the windward side of a busy street in Copenhagen, Denmark. The aerosol was characterized both at the curbside and, to obtain the background concentration, at rooftop level. Particle hygroscopicity, a key parameter affecting respiratory tract deposition, was also measured at the same time of exposure. The total deposition fraction of the curbside particles in the range 12-580 nm was 0.60 by number, 0.29 by surface area, and 0.23 by mass. The deposition fractions of the "traffic exhaust" contribution, calculated as the hydrophobic fraction of the curbside particles, was 0.68, 0.35, and 0.28 by number, surface area, and mass, respectively. The deposited amount of traffic exhaust particles was 16 times higher by number and 3 times higher by surface area compared to the deposition of residential biofuel combustion particles investigated previously (equal inhaled mass concentrations). This was because the traffic exhaust particles had both a higher deposition probability and a higher number and surface area concentration per unit mass. To validate the results, the respiratory tract deposition was estimated by using the well-established ICRP model. Predictions were in agreement with experimental results when the effects of particle hygroscopicity were considered in the model.
PubMed ID
19673248 View in PubMed
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Intake of wholegrain products is associated with dietary, lifestyle, anthropometric and socio-economic factors in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90136
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2009 Sep;12(9):1519-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2009
Author
Egeberg Rikke
Frederiksen Kirsten
Olsen Anja
Johnsen Nina F
Loft Steffen
Overvad Kim
Tjønneland Anne
Author Affiliation
Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, The Danish Cancer Society, Strandboulevarden 49, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark. egeberg@cancer.dk
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2009 Sep;12(9):1519-30
Date
Sep-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the association between wholegrain products intake and other dietary, lifestyle, anthropometric and socio-economic factors. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study, with data on diet, lifestyle and socio-economic factors obtained from questionnaires. Anthropometric measurements were collected by trained professionals. Multiple linear and principal components regression analyses were used in statistical analyses. SETTING: Part of the Diet, Cancer and Health study, a prospective cohort study to evaluate the aetiological role of diet on cancer risk, conducted in the greater Copenhagen and Aarhus area, Denmark. SUBJECTS: Men and women (n 54,720) aged 50-64 years. RESULTS: In multiple linear regression analyses focusing on individual dietary factors, intake of wholegrain products was associated with intake of all dietary factors studied (fish, red meat, poultry, processed meat, dairy products, fruits, vegetables, cakes and refined-grain products). The strongest positive associations were seen for intake of vegetables and processed meat, whereas the strongest negative associations were seen for intake of red meat and refined-grain products. Regression analyses on dietary patterns identified by principal components analysis yielded similar results. Also, wholegrain products intake was positively associated with cycling, taking dietary supplements and high school education, and negatively associated with intake of alcohol, BMI and smoking. CONCLUSIONS: Intake of wholegrain products is associated with other dietary factors, healthier lifestyle habits and higher socio-economic status. Therefore future studies need to account for the possible confounding by other dietary and lifestyle-related parameters when investigating relationships between wholegrain products intake and disease risk.
PubMed ID
19195420 View in PubMed
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Physical activity and risk of colon cancer in a cohort of Danish middle-aged men and women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79458
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2006;21(12):877-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Johnsen Nina Føns
Christensen Jane
Thomsen Birthe Lykke
Olsen Anja
Loft Steffen
Overvad Kim
Tjønneland Anne
Author Affiliation
Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, Strandboulevarden 49, 2100, Copenhagen, Denmark. nina@cancer.dk
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2006;21(12):877-84
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body mass index
Cohort Studies
Colonic Neoplasms - epidemiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Diet
Female
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity
Recreation
Risk
Socioeconomic Factors
Work
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of occupational activity and leisure time activity on incident colon cancer risk in a Danish middle-aged population. METHODS: In the cohort, Diet, Cancer and Health, which included 28,356 women and 26,122 men aged 50-64 years at baseline, 140 women and 157 men were diagnosed with colon cancer from 1993 to 2003. The associations between occupational and leisure time activity in terms of a MET-score and the single activities, sports, cycling, walking, gardening, housework and do-it-yourself work, and incident colon cancer were investigated. Leisure time activity was investigated in two ways using the Cox proportional hazards model: by comparison of active versus non-active and by investigating a possible dose-response relationship while allowing a separate association for non-active individuals. RESULTS: No associations were found between risk of colon cancer and occupational activity, MET-hours per week of total leisure time activity, residuals from a regression of each activity on the total MET-hours or the time spent on any of the six types of leisure time activities. However, a borderline significant association was found with the number of activities in which the participants were active. For each additional activity IRR = 0.87 (0.76-1.00) for women and IRR = 0.88 (0.78-1.00) for men. CONCLUSION: Our data do not support the evidence of an inverse association between colon cancer risk and occupational activity or leisure time activity, but avoiding a sedentary lifestyle by participating in different activities may reduce colon cancer risk.
PubMed ID
17160429 View in PubMed
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