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Adolescent neck and shoulder pain--the association with depression, physical activity, screen-based activities, and use of health care services.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262816
Source
J Adolesc Health. 2014 Sep;55(3):366-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2014
Author
Solbjørg Makalani Myrtveit
Børge Sivertsen
Jens Christoffer Skogen
Lisbeth Frostholm
Kjell Morten Stormark
Mari Hysing
Source
J Adolesc Health. 2014 Sep;55(3):366-72
Date
Sep-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Health Services - utilization
Cell Phones - utilization
Depression - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Humans
Internet - utilization
Male
Motor Activity
Neck Pain - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology - psychology
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Shoulder Pain - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology - psychology
Television - utilization
Video Games - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Neck and shoulder pain is frequent in adolescents, and multiple factors seem to affect the risk of such symptoms. We aimed to investigate the prevalence of neck and shoulder pain in Norwegian adolescence and to examine whether behavioral and emotional factors were associated with the risk of neck and shoulder pain. Finally we aimed to investigate whether neck and shoulder pain was related to the use of health services.
Data from the population-based study ung@hordaland were used. Participants were asked how often during the last 6 months they had experienced neck and shoulder pain. The association between frequent neck and shoulder pain and physical activity, symptoms of depression, and screen-based activities was evaluated using logistic regression analyses stratified by gender. The relative risk of visiting health services when reporting neck and shoulder pain was calculated using multiple logistic regression analyses.
Frequent neck and shoulder pain was reported by 20.0% (1,797 of the total 8,990) and more often by girls than boys (p
PubMed ID
24746679 View in PubMed
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[A new, empirically established hypochondriasis diagnosis--secondary publication].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173279
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2005 Aug 8;167(32):2896-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-8-2005
Author
Per K Fink
Eva Ørnbøl
Tomas Toft
Kaj Sparle Christensen
Lisbeth Frostholm
Frede Olesen
Author Affiliation
Arhus Universitetshospital, Arhus Sygehus, Forskningsklinikken for Funktionelle Lidelser og Psykosomatik, ogAarhus Universitet, Forskningsenheden for Almen Praksis. flip@as.aaa.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2005 Aug 8;167(32):2896-9
Date
Aug-8-2005
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Denmark - epidemiology
Family Practice
Female
Humans
Hypochondriasis - classification - diagnosis - psychology
Interview, Psychological
Male
Mass Screening
Middle Aged
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Questionnaires
Somatoform Disorders - classification - diagnosis - epidemiology
Abstract
The narrow ICD-10 and DSM-IV definition of hypochondriasis makes it a rarely used diagnosis. Based on a latent class analysis of the symptoms exhibited by 701 patients (ages 18-65) in general practice, a new and more valid hypochondriasis diagnosis was defined in this study. The main symptom is "obsessive rumination about illnesses", and the patient must also have at least one of five other symptoms. The prevalence was 9.5 for both genders. There was a good agreement between the diagnoses made during the psychiatric interview and the physicians' assessments.
PubMed ID
16109196 View in PubMed
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A brief case-finding questionnaire for common mental disorders: the CMDQ.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9248
Source
Fam Pract. 2005 Aug;22(4):448-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2005
Author
Kaj Sparle Christensen
Per Fink
Tomas Toft
Lisbeth Frostholm
Eva Ornbøl
Frede Olesen
Author Affiliation
The Research Unit for General Practice, University of Aarhus, Denmark. kasc@alm.au.dk
Source
Fam Pract. 2005 Aug;22(4):448-57
Date
Aug-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Family Practice
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - classification - diagnosis
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The aim of the study was to validate a new case-finding instrument for common mental disorders (CMDQ). METHODS: A cross-sectional, stratified, two-phase study was carried out in 28 general practices in Aarhus County, Denmark. 1785 consecutive patients, 18-65 years old, consulting 38 GPs with a new health problem participated. Patients were screened before consultation using a one-page screening questionnaire including subscales for somatisation (SCL-SOM and Whiteley-7), anxiety (SCL-ANX4), depression (SCL-DEP6) and alcohol abuse (CAGE). A stratified subsample of 701 patients was interviewed using the Schedules for Clinical Assessment in Neuropsychiatry (SCAN) interview. We tested the external validity of the scales using the SCAN interview as gold standard. All data were analysed using appropriate weighted procedures to control for the two-phase sampling design and non-response bias. RESULTS: Estimates of sensitivity and specificity for relevant ICD-10 diagnoses at theoretical optimal cut-off points on subscales: Depressive disorder: 78/86 (SCL-DEP6); Alcohol abuse or dependence: 78/97 (CAGE); Severe anxiety disorder: 77/85 (SCL-ANX4); Somatisation disorder: 83/56 (SCL-SOM); and 75/52 (Whiteley-7); any mental disorder: 72/72 (SCL-8). At the theoretical optimal cut-off points the CMDQ demonstrated higher diagnostic accuracy than GPs on any diagnosis evaluated. CONCLUSION: The study results suggest that the CMDQ has excellent external validity for use as a diagnostic aid in primary care settings.
PubMed ID
15814580 View in PubMed
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The FIP study: a randomised, controlled trial of screening and recognition of psychiatric disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9595
Source
Br J Gen Pract. 2003 Oct;53(495):758-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2003
Author
Kaj Sparle Christensen
Tomas Toft
Lisbeth Frostholm
Eva Ørnbol
Per Fink
Frede Olesen
Author Affiliation
Research Unit for Functional Disorders, Aarhus University Hospital, Research Unit for General Practice, Aarhus University. kspar@akh.aaa.dk
Source
Br J Gen Pract. 2003 Oct;53(495):758-63
Date
Oct-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Denmark
Family Practice
Female
Humans
Male
Mass Screening - methods
Mental Disorders - diagnosis
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Questionnaires - standards
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Research on questionnaires as screening tools for psychiatric disorders has yielded conflicting results. AIM: To examine the effect of a routinely administered questionnaire on recognition of common psychiatric disorders in general practice. DESIGN OF STUDY: Randomised controlled trial. SETTING: Twenty-eight general practices in Aarhus County, Denmark. METHOD: Thirty-eight general practitioners (GPs) and 1785 consecutive patients, aged 18-65 years old, presenting with a new health problem, participated. Before consultation, patients were screened using a brief screening questionnaire (SQ) including somatisation, anxiety, depression, and alcohol abuse scales. Patients were randomised to one of two groups: 900 questionnaires were disclosed and scored by the GPs, 885 were blinded. A stratified subsample of 701 patients was interviewed after the consultation using a standardised psychiatric research interview (SCAN). RESULTS: Overall the GPs' recognition rates were 14% (95% confidence interval [CI] = -2 to 30) better for depression and 35% (95% CI = 2 to 68) better for alcohol problems when SQs were disclosed. Recognition rates for anxiety improved 8% (95% CI = -9 to 26) overall. In the case of somatoform disorders, disclosure showed no effect overall. Among those with high SQ scores, however, disclosure increased recognition rates on any mental disorder evaluated. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrated limited usefulness for routine screening for common psychiatric disorders. However, findings suggest that the SQ may be useful for case-finding among a subgroup of patients with high SQ scores.
PubMed ID
14601350 View in PubMed
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Initial healthcare and coping preferences are associated with outcome 1 year after whiplash trauma: a multicentre 1-year follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268744
Source
BMJ Open. 2015;5(3):e007239
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Solbjørg Makalani Myrtveit
Tina Carstensen
Helge Kasch
Eva Ørnbøl
Lisbeth Frostholm
Source
BMJ Open. 2015;5(3):e007239
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic
Adult
Chronic Pain - etiology
Denmark
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Life Style
Male
Manipulation, Chiropractic
Middle Aged
Neck Pain - etiology
Patient Preference
Physical Therapy Modalities
Prospective Studies
Referral and Consultation
Sick Leave
Whiplash Injuries - complications - drug therapy - therapy
Work Capacity Evaluation
Young Adult
Abstract
Individuals exposed to whiplash collisions have to cope with the stressful event as well as early physical symptoms. As in other chronic pain conditions, coping has been associated with outcome after whiplash. In this study, our aim was to examine whether initial coping preferences were associated with the development of chronic whiplash.
Prospective study.
Primary care.
740 acute whiplash patients were recruited from emergency units and general practitioners after car collisions in Denmark. Within 10 days postinjury, participants were asked what they believed could help them get better. At 12-month follow-up, the level of neck pain and capability to work was obtained. Whether coping preferences (baseline) were associated with outcome was investigated using multiple regression analyses.
Persistent neck pain was most strongly associated with preferring medications (mean difference=1.24 (95% CI 0.67 to 1.82)) and sickness absence (mean difference=1.18 (95% CI 0.53 to 1.82)). Reduced work capability was most strongly associated with preferring medications (OR=3.53 (95% CI 2.13 to 5.86)), sickness absence (OR=3.05 (95% CI 1.80 to 5.17)) and being referred to a physiotherapist/chiropractor (OR=3.03 (95% CI 1.33 to 6.91)). Active coping was associated with better outcomes: Participants preferring to change their lifestyle were protected against reduced work capability (OR=0.11 (95% CI 0.01 to 0.78)). Individuals who wanted to keep living as usual only (no other preference reported) were protected against neck pain (mean difference -1.62 (95% CI -2.39 to -0.84)) and reduced work capability (OR=0.09 (95% CI 0.01 to 0.64)).
A simple nine-item measure of coping preferences is associated with the development of chronic neck pain and reduced capability to work following whiplash trauma and may be used to identify individuals at risk of poor recovery.
Notes
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Erratum In: BMJ Open. 2015;5(5):e007239corr125948408
PubMed ID
25795697 View in PubMed
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Mental disorders in primary care: prevalence and co-morbidity among disorders. results from the functional illness in primary care (FIP) study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9135
Source
Psychol Med. 2005 Aug;35(8):1175-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2005
Author
Tomas Toft
Per Fink
Eva Oernboel
Kaj Christensen
Lisbeth Frostholm
Frede Olesen
Author Affiliation
Research Clinic for Functional Disorders and Psychosomatics, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark. tomas.toft@ouh.fyns-amt.dk
Source
Psychol Med. 2005 Aug;35(8):1175-84
Date
Aug-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcoholism - diagnosis - epidemiology
Anxiety Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Female
Humans
Hypochondriasis - diagnosis - epidemiology
International Classification of Diseases
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Prevalence
Primary Health Care
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Somatoform Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Prevalence and co-occurrence of mental disorders is high among patients consulting their family general practitioner (GP) for a new health problem, but data on diagnostics and socio-demographics are sketchy. METHOD: A cross-sectional two-phase epidemiological study. A total of 1785 consecutive patients with new complaints, aged 18-65 years, consulting 28 family practices during March-April 2000 in Aarhus County, Denmark were screened, in the waiting room, for mental and somatic symptoms with SCL-8 and SCL-Somatization questionnaires, for illness worry with Whitely-7 and for alcohol dependency with CAGE. In a stratified random sample of 701 patients, physician interviewers established ICD-10 diagnoses using the SCAN interview. Prevalence was calculated using weighted logistic regression, thus correcting for sample skewness. RESULTS: Half of the patients fulfilled criteria for an ICD-10 mental disorders and a third of these for more than one group of disorders. Women had higher prevalence of somatization disorder and overall mental disorders than men. Men had higher prevalence of alcohol abuse and hypochondriasis than women. Psychiatric morbidity tended to increase with age. Prevalence of somatoform disorders was 35.9% (95% CI 30.4-41.9), anxiety disorders 164% (95% CI 12.7-20.9), mood disorders 13.5% (95% CI 11.1-16.3), organic mental disorders 3.1% (95% CI 1.6-5.7) and alcohol abuse 2.2% (95% CI 1.5-3.1). Co-morbidities between these groups were highest for anxiety disorders, where 89% also had another mental diagnosis, and lowest for somatoform disorders with 39%. CONCLUSIONS: ICD-10 mental disorders are very prevalent in primary care and there is a high co-occurrence between most disorders. Somatoform disorders, however, more often than not exist without other mental disorders.
PubMed ID
16116943 View in PubMed
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A new, empirically established hypochondriasis diagnosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9404
Source
Am J Psychiatry. 2004 Sep;161(9):1680-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2004
Author
Per Fink
Eva Ørnbøl
Tomas Toft
Kaj Christensen Sparle
Lisbeth Frostholm
Frede Olesen
Author Affiliation
Research Unit for Functional Disorders, Aarhus University Hospital, DK-8000 Aarhus C, Denmark. flip@akh.aaa.dk
Source
Am J Psychiatry. 2004 Sep;161(9):1680-91
Date
Sep-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcoholism - diagnosis - epidemiology
Anxiety Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Denmark - epidemiology
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Female
Humans
Hypochondriasis - classification - diagnosis - psychology
Male
Mass Screening - methods
Personality Inventory
Primary Health Care - methods
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Severity of Illness Index
Somatoform Disorders - classification - diagnosis - epidemiology
Terminology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The narrow ICD-10 and DSM-IV definition of hypochondriasis makes it rarely used yet does not prevent extensive diagnosis overlap. This study identified a distinct hypochondriasis symptom cluster and defined diagnostic criteria. METHOD: Consecutive patients (N=1,785) consulting primary care physicians for new illness were screened for somatization, anxiety, depression, and alcohol abuse. A stratified subgroup of 701 patients were interviewed with the Schedules for Clinical Assessment in Neuropsychiatry and questions addressing common hypochondriasis symptoms. Symptom patterns were analyzed by latent class analysis. RESULTS: Patients fell into three classes based on six symptoms: preoccupation with the idea of harboring an illness or with bodily function, rumination about illness, suggestibility, unrealistic fear of infection, fascination with medical information, and fear of prescribed medication. All symptoms, particularly rumination, were frequent in one of the classes. Classification allowed definition of new diagnostic criteria for hypochondriasis and division of the cases into "mild" and "severe." The weighted prevalence of severe cases was 9.5% versus 5.8% for DSM-IV hypochondriasis. Compared with DSM-IV hypochondriasis, this approach produced less overlap with other somatoform disorders, similar overlap with nonsomatoform psychiatric disorders, and similar assessments by primary care physicians. Severe cases of the new hypochondriasis lasted 2 or more years in 54.3% of the subjects and 1 month or less in 27.2%. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that rumination about illness plus at least one of five other symptoms form a distinct diagnostic entity performing better than the current DSM-IV hypochondriasis diagnosis. However, these criteria are preliminary, awaiting cross-validation in other subject groups.
PubMed ID
15337660 View in PubMed
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The patients' illness perceptions and the use of primary health care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70485
Source
Psychosom Med. 2005 Nov-Dec;67(6):997-1005
Publication Type
Article
Author
Lisbeth Frostholm
Per Fink
Kaj S Christensen
Tomas Toft
Eva Oernboel
Frede Olesen
John Weinman
Author Affiliation
Research Clinic for Functional Disorders and Psychosomatics, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. frost@as.aaa.dk
Source
Psychosom Med. 2005 Nov-Dec;67(6):997-1005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health
Chronic Disease - epidemiology
Comparative Study
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health status
Humans
Life Style
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Patients - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Personality Inventory
Primary Health Care - utilization
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sick Role
Somatoform Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology - psychology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To investigate if primary care patients' perceptions of a current health problem were associated with use of health care. METHOD: One thousand seven hundred eighty-five patients presenting a new health problem to 1 of 38 physicians from 28 general practices in Aarhus County, Denmark. Patients completed a questionnaire on their illness perceptions and emotional distress before the consultation. The physicians completed a questionnaire for each patient on diagnostics and prognostics. Register data on primary health care utilization 3 years before and 2 years after baseline were obtained. Odds ratios were estimated to examine associations between previous health care use and illness perceptions. Linear regression analysis was performed to examine if illness perceptions predicted later health care use. RESULTS: Previous use: Higher use was associated with psychosocial, stress, and lifestyle attributions. Accident/chance attributions were associated with higher use for patients with a chronic disorder but with lower use for patients without a chronic disorder. A strong illness identity (number of self-reported symptoms), illness worry, a long timeline perspective, a belief that the symptoms would have serious consequences, and all emotional distress variables were associated with higher use. Use during follow-up: Infection/lowered immunity attributions were associated with higher use for patients with a chronic disorder, whereas psychosocial and lifestyle attributions were associated with higher use for all patients. Illness worry and all emotional distress variables predicted higher health care use. A strong illness identity, a long timeline perspective, a belief in serious consequences, and stress and accident/chance attributions were among the strongest predictors of health care use in a multivariate model including all variables. CONCLUSIONS: Patients' perceptions of a current health problem are associated with health care use and may offer an obvious starting point for a biopsychosocial approach in primary care.
PubMed ID
16314606 View in PubMed
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Physical symptom attributions: a defining characteristic of somatoform disorders?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268929
Source
Gen Hosp Psychiatry. 2015 Mar-Apr;37(2):147-52
Publication Type
Article
Author
Lisbeth Frostholm
Eva Ørnbøl
Per K Fink
Source
Gen Hosp Psychiatry. 2015 Mar-Apr;37(2):147-52
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Comorbidity
Denmark - epidemiology
Depressive Disorder - economics - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Health Expenditures - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Primary Health Care - economics - statistics & numerical data
Somatoform Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Abstract
We examined whether primary care patients were more likely to perceive a current health problem as 'physical illness only' as opposed to entailing psychological difficulties if they had a comorbid somatoform disorder compared to patients who had (a) both comorbid somatoform disorder and anxiety/depression or (b) comorbid anxiety and/or depression, and a reference group of (c) patients with well-defined physical disease. We examined whether attributions predicted future health expenditures.
A total of 1209 of 1785 patients completed questions on patient-perceived illness. The physicians diagnosed the current health problem. A stratified subsample was interviewed using the Schedules for Clinical Assessment in Neuropsychiatry. Health expenditure was obtained from registers for a 2-year period.
The belief that the current health problem was only physical was endorsed by 86% of patients presenting physical disease, 58% of patients with somatoform disorders, 29% of patients with both somatoform disorders and anxiety/depression and 24% of patients with anxiety or depressive disorders (?2=269.2, df=3, P
PubMed ID
25677210 View in PubMed
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A prospective evaluation of the Chronic Pain Self-Management Programme in a Danish population of chronic pain patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277100
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2015 May;98(5):677-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
Mimi Mehlsen
Lea Heegaard
Lisbeth Frostholm
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2015 May;98(5):677-80
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aged
Chronic Pain - psychology - rehabilitation
Cognition
Denmark
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Pain Measurement
Patient Education as Topic
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life - psychology
Self Care - methods - psychology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
This study evaluates the feasibility and changes in pain, pain cognition, and distress during a patient education course and a 5-month follow-up period. The Chronic Pain Self-Management Programme (CPSMP) is a lay-led patient education consisting of six manualized sessions.
A Danish adaptation of the CPSMP was tested in four municipalities. The sample consisted of 74 women and 13 men between 26 and 80 years with a long pain history (+10 years). Participants completed questionnaires before the CPSMP, immediately after and 5 months after the program.
The study showed that the Danish version of the CPSMP was feasible. The sample was heterogeneous with respect to age, education, duration and causes of pain but all participants reported serious pain and most experienced high levels of distress and disability. Participants evaluated the CPSMP as satisfying and more than 75% would recommend the program to other patients. Participants showed significant improvements on pain, disability, catastrophizing, depression, anxiety, and health worry, and changes were stable through the follow-up period.
A consistent pattern of stable improvements in pain, pain cognition and distress was observed but the scope of changes was modest.
The Danish version of the CPSMP is feasible.
PubMed ID
25662621 View in PubMed
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15 records – page 1 of 2.