Skip header and navigation

Refine By

26 records – page 1 of 3.

Community-dwelling older people with an injurious fall are likely to sustain new injurious falls within 5 years--a prospective long-term follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264015
Source
BMC Geriatr. 2014;14:120
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Petra Pohl
Ellinor Nordin
Anders Lundquist
Ulrica Bergström
Lillemor Lundin-Olsson
Source
BMC Geriatr. 2014;14:120
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Geriatric Assessment
Humans
Incidence
Independent living
Male
Motor Activity - physiology
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
Fall-related injuries in older people are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Self-reported fall events in the last year is often used to estimate fall risk in older people. However, it remains to be investigated if the fall frequency and the consequences of the falls have an impact on the risk for subsequent injurious falls in the long term. The objective of this study was to investigate if a history of one single non-injurious fall, at least two non-injurious falls, or at least one injurious fall within 12 months increases the risk of sustaining future injurious falls.
Community-dwelling individuals 75-93 years of age (n = 230) were initially followed prospectively with monthly calendars reporting falls over a period of 12 months. The participants were classified into four groups based on the number and type of falls (0, 1, =2 non-injurious falls, and =1 injurious fall severe enough to cause a visit to a hospital emergency department). The participants were then followed for several years (mean time 5.0 years ±1.1) regarding injurious falls requiring a visit to the emergency department. The Andersen-Gill method of Cox regression for multiple events was used to estimate the risk of injurious falls.
During the long-term follow-up period, thirty per cent of the participants suffered from at least one injurious fall. Those with a self-reported history of at least one injurious fall during the initial 12 months follow-up period showed a significantly higher risk for sustaining subsequent injurious falls in the long term (hazard ratio 2.78; 95% CI, 1.40-5.50) compared to those with no falls. No other group showed an increased risk.
In community-dwelling people over 75 years of age, a history of at least one self-reported injurious fall severe enough to cause a visit to the emergency department within a period of 12 months implies an increased risk of sustaining future injurious falls. Our results support the recommendations to offer a multifactorial fall-risk assessment coupled with adequate interventions to community-dwelling people over 75 years who present to the ED due to an injurious fall.
Notes
Cites: Med Clin North Am. 2006 Sep;90(5):807-2416962843
Cites: JAMA. 2007 Jan 3;297(1):77-8617200478
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2008 Sep;19(9):1267-7318214568
Cites: Acad Emerg Med. 2009 Mar;16(3):211-919281493
Cites: Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2009 Nov-Dec;49(3):390-619144414
Cites: Gait Posture. 2010 Mar;31(3):317-2120047833
Cites: Gait Posture. 2010 May;32(1):92-720399100
Cites: Epidemiology. 2010 Sep;21(5):658-6820585256
Cites: JAMA. 2011 Jan 5;305(1):50-821205966
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2011 Jan;59(1):148-5721226685
Cites: Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2012 May-Jun;54(3):421-821862143
Cites: Calcif Tissue Int. 2011 Sep;89(3):203-1021667164
Cites: Scand J Caring Sci. 2011 Mar;25(1):185-9320626698
Cites: Age Ageing. 2012 May;41(3):358-6522156559
Cites: Emerg Med J. 2012 Sep;29(9):742-721965178
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2012;9:CD00714622972103
Cites: Maturitas. 2013 May;75(1):51-6123523272
Cites: Clin Interv Aging. 2013;8:765-7423836966
Cites: BMC Med Res Methodol. 2013;13:9223855337
Cites: BMC Health Serv Res. 2013;13:28623890164
Cites: Prev Med. 2013 Nov;57(5):511-723872174
Cites: BMC Geriatr. 2014;14:1524495705
Cites: Prehosp Emerg Care. 2014 Jul-Sep;18(3):342-924460481
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2000 Oct 9;160(18):2788-9511025789
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2003 Jan 2;348(1):42-912510042
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2003 Oct;51(10):1356-6414511154
Cites: BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2004 May 17;5:1315147583
Cites: J Psychiatr Res. 1975 Nov;12(3):189-981202204
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1988 Dec 29;319(26):1701-73205267
Cites: JAMA. 1989 May 12;261(18):2663-82709546
Cites: J Gerontol. 1991 Sep;46(5):M164-701890282
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1993 Feb 1;137(3):342-548452142
Cites: J Gerontol. 1994 Mar;49(2):M85-948126356
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 1994 Oct;42(10):1110-77930338
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 1995 Nov;43(11):1214-217594154
Cites: Age Ageing. 1996 Jan;25(1):29-388670526
Cites: Public Health. 1996 Mar;110(2):115-88901255
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1997 Oct 30;337(18):1279-849345078
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 1999 Jan;52(1):27-379973071
Cites: Md State Med J. 1965 Feb;14:61-514258950
Cites: Inj Prev. 2005 Apr;11(2):115-915805442
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2005 Sep;53(9):1618-2216137297
Cites: Age Ageing. 2006 Jan;35(1):5-1016364930
PubMed ID
25407714 View in PubMed
Less detail

Criteria for evaluation of measurement properties of clinical balance measures for use in fall prevention studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158428
Source
J Eval Clin Pract. 2008 Apr;14(2):236-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Rolf Moe-Nilssen
Ellinor Nordin
Lillemor Lundin-Olsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, University of Bergen, Norway. rolf.moe-nilssen@isf.uib.no
Source
J Eval Clin Pract. 2008 Apr;14(2):236-40
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - prevention & control
Female
Humans
Male
Norway
Postural Balance - physiology
Predictive value of tests
Psychomotor Performance - physiology
Reproducibility of Results
Research Design
Abstract
Work Package 3 of the Prevention of Falls Network Europe has evaluated measurement properties of clinical balance measures to be used to: (1) select participants for interventions with the goal to prevent falls in older people, and (2) assess the results of such intervention on balance function. Inclusion in a fall prevention study may be based on measures identifying subjects who have impaired balance or increased risk of future falls. We propose that an appropriate statistical method to analyse discriminative ability of a balance measure is discriminant analysis or logistic regression analysis. The optimal cut-off score is best determined by plotting a receiver-operating-characteristic curve for different cut-off values. The evaluation of predictors for risk of future falls should be based on a study design with a prospective data collection of falls. Sensitivity to change is a measurement property needed to evaluate the outcome of an intervention. The standardized response mean is frequently encountered in the literature and is recommended as a statistical measure of sensitivity to change in the context of an intervention study. Adequate reliability is a prerequisite for consistent measurement. Relative reliability may be reported as an intraclass correlation coefficient and absolute reliability as the within-subject standard deviation (s(w)), also called standard error of measurement. When measurement error is proportional to the score, calculation of a coefficient of variation can be considered. In a second paper, the authors will evaluate clinical balance measures for use in fall prevention studies based upon criteria recommended in this report.
PubMed ID
18324932 View in PubMed
Less detail

Determinants of self-rated health in old age: a population-based, cross-sectional study using the International Classification of Functioning.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131873
Source
BMC Public Health. 2011;11:670
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Solveig A Arnadottir
Elin D Gunnarsdottir
Hans Stenlund
Lillemor Lundin-Olsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Division of Physiotherapy, Umeå University, Sweden. saa@unak.is
Source
BMC Public Health. 2011;11:670
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diagnostic Self Evaluation
Female
Health status
Humans
Iceland
International Classification of Diseases
Male
Rural Health
Urban health
Abstract
Self-rated health (SRH) is a widely used indicator of general health and multiple studies have supported the predictive validity of SRH in older populations concerning future health, functional decline, disability, and mortality. The aim of this study was to use the theoretical framework of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) to create a better understanding of factors associated with SRH among community-dwelling older people in urban and rural areas.
The study design was population-based and cross-sectional. Participants were 185 Icelanders, randomly selected from a national registry, community-dwelling, 65-88 years old, 63% urban residents, and 52% men. Participants were asked: "In general, would you say your health is excellent, very good, good, fair, or poor?" Associations with SRH were analyzed with ordinal logistic regression. Explanatory variables represented aspects of body functions, activities, participation, environmental factors and personal factors components of the ICF.
Univariate analysis revealed that SRH was significantly associated with all analyzed ICF components through 16 out of 18 explanatory variables. Multivariate analysis, however, demonstrated that SRH had an independent association with five variables representing ICF body functions, activities, and personal factors components: The likelihood of a better SRH increased with advanced lower extremity capacity (adjusted odds ratio [adjOR] = 1.05, p
Notes
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2000 Feb;54(2):123-910715745
Cites: J Gerontol B Psychol Sci Soc Sci. 2010 Nov;65(6):715-920028951
Cites: J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2001 Oct;56(10):M609-1711584033
Cites: Lancet. 2002 Jan 19;359(9302):187-811812551
Cites: J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2002 Apr;57(4):M209-1611909885
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2003 Jan;56(2):203-1712473308
Cites: Psychol Aging. 2004 Sep;19(3):402-815382991
Cites: J Psychiatr Res. 1975 Nov;12(3):189-981202204
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1980 Jul 17;303(3):130-57383070
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1982 Aug;72(8):800-87091475
Cites: J Psychiatr Res. 1982-1983;17(1):37-497183759
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 1991 Feb;39(2):142-81991946
Cites: BMJ. 1992 Jul 18;305(6846):160-41285753
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 1993 Feb;46(2):153-628437031
Cites: J Gerontol B Psychol Sci Soc Sci. 1995 Nov;50(6):S344-537583813
Cites: Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 1995 Dec;76(12):1125-98540788
Cites: J Gerontol B Psychol Sci Soc Sci. 1996 Mar;51(2):S96-1048785698
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 1998 Nov;51(11):903-129817107
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1999 Jun;48(11):1507-1510400253
Cites: Health Psychol. 2004 Nov;23(6):651-515546234
Cites: J Rehabil Med. 2005 Jul;37(4):212-816024476
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2006 Apr;60(4):364-7216537356
Cites: Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2006 May-Jun;42(3):277-8816214245
Cites: Heart. 2006 Oct;92(10):1396-40116547204
Cites: Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2006 Dec;21(12):1175-8016988957
Cites: Phys Ther. 2007 May;87(5):525-3517405808
Cites: Circulation. 2007 Aug 28;116(9):1094-10517671236
Cites: J Eval Clin Pract. 2007 Dec;13(6):882-818070258
Cites: J Agromedicine. 2008;13(2):111-819042702
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2009 Jun;37(4):409-1719237433
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2009 Aug;69(3):307-1619520474
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2009 Oct;99(10):1872-819696390
Cites: Clin Rehabil. 2009 Oct;23(10):873-8719675114
Cites: Can J Rural Med. 2009 Fall;14(4):150-619835706
Cites: Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2010 Jan;91(1):156-6320103411
Cites: Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2010 May;91(5):714-2120434608
Cites: Fam Community Health. 2001 Jul;24(2):49-7211373166
PubMed ID
21867517 View in PubMed
Less detail

Effectiveness of a self-managed digital exercise programme to prevent falls in older community-dwelling adults: study protocol for the Safe Step randomised controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature305874
Source
BMJ Open. 2020 05 17; 10(5):e036194
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
05-17-2020
Author
Beatrice Pettersson
Lillemor Lundin-Olsson
Dawn A Skelton
Per Liv
Magnus Zingmark
Erik Rosendahl
Marlene Sandlund
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden beatrice.pettersson@umu.se.
Source
BMJ Open. 2020 05 17; 10(5):e036194
Date
05-17-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Exercise interventions have a strong evidence base for falls prevention. However, exercise can be challenging to implement and often has limited reach and poor adherence. Digital technology provides opportunities for both increased access to the intervention and support over time. Further knowledge needs to be gained regarding the effectiveness of completely self-managed digital exercise interventions. The main objective of this study is to compare the effectiveness of a self-managed digital exercise programme, Safe Step, in combination with monthly educational videos with educational videos alone, on falls over 1?year in older community-dwelling adults.
A two-arm parallel randomised controlled trial will be conducted with at least 1400 community-living older adults (70+ years) who experience impaired balance. Participants will be recruited throughout Sweden with enrolment through the project website. They will be randomly allocated to either the Safe Step exercise programme with additional monthly educational videos about healthy ageing and fall prevention, or the monthly education videos alone. Participants receiving the exercise intervention will be asked to exercise at home for at least 30?min, 3 times/week with support of the Safe Step application. The primary outcome will be rate of falls (fall per person year). Participants will keep a fall calendar and report falls at the end of each month through a digital questionnaire. Further assessments of secondary outcomes will be made through self-reported questionnaires and a self-test of 30?s chair stand test at baseline and 3, 6, 9 and 12 months after study start. Data will be analysed according to the intention-to-treat principle.
Ethical approval was obtained by The Regional Ethical Review Board in Umeå (Dnr 2018/433-31). Findings will be disseminated through the project web-site, peer-reviewed journals, national and international conferences and through senior citizen organisations' newsletters.
NCT03963570.
PubMed ID
32423936 View in PubMed
Less detail

Effectiveness of a self-managed digital exercise programme to prevent falls in older community-dwelling adults: study protocol for the Safe Step randomised controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature311813
Source
BMJ Open. 2020 05 17; 10(5):e036194
Publication Type
Clinical Trial Protocol
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
05-17-2020
Author
Beatrice Pettersson
Lillemor Lundin-Olsson
Dawn A Skelton
Per Liv
Magnus Zingmark
Erik Rosendahl
Marlene Sandlund
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden beatrice.pettersson@umu.se.
Source
BMJ Open. 2020 05 17; 10(5):e036194
Date
05-17-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Clinical Trial Protocol
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Accidental Falls - prevention & control
Aged
Exercise
Exercise Therapy
Fear
Humans
Independent living
Postural Balance
Quality of Life
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Sweden
Abstract
Exercise interventions have a strong evidence base for falls prevention. However, exercise can be challenging to implement and often has limited reach and poor adherence. Digital technology provides opportunities for both increased access to the intervention and support over time. Further knowledge needs to be gained regarding the effectiveness of completely self-managed digital exercise interventions. The main objective of this study is to compare the effectiveness of a self-managed digital exercise programme, Safe Step, in combination with monthly educational videos with educational videos alone, on falls over 1?year in older community-dwelling adults.
A two-arm parallel randomised controlled trial will be conducted with at least 1400 community-living older adults (70+ years) who experience impaired balance. Participants will be recruited throughout Sweden with enrolment through the project website. They will be randomly allocated to either the Safe Step exercise programme with additional monthly educational videos about healthy ageing and fall prevention, or the monthly education videos alone. Participants receiving the exercise intervention will be asked to exercise at home for at least 30?min, 3 times/week with support of the Safe Step application. The primary outcome will be rate of falls (fall per person year). Participants will keep a fall calendar and report falls at the end of each month through a digital questionnaire. Further assessments of secondary outcomes will be made through self-reported questionnaires and a self-test of 30?s chair stand test at baseline and 3, 6, 9 and 12 months after study start. Data will be analysed according to the intention-to-treat principle.
Ethical approval was obtained by The Regional Ethical Review Board in Umeå (Dnr 2018/433-31). Findings will be disseminated through the project web-site, peer-reviewed journals, national and international conferences and through senior citizen organisations' newsletters.
NCT03963570.
PubMed ID
32423936 View in PubMed
Less detail

Effects of a High-Intensity Functional Exercise Program on Dependence in Activities of Daily Living and Balance in Older Adults with Dementia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269359
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2016 Jan;64(1):55-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2016
Author
Annika Toots
Håkan Littbrand
Nina Lindelöf
Robert Wiklund
Henrik Holmberg
Peter Nordström
Lillemor Lundin-Olsson
Yngve Gustafson
Erik Rosendahl
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2016 Jan;64(1):55-64
Date
Jan-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
To investigate the effects of a high-intensity functional exercise program on independence in activities of  daily living (ADLs) and balance in older people with dementia and whether exercise effects differed between dementia types.
Cluster-randomized controlled trial: Umeå Dementia and Exercise (UMDEX) study.
Residential care facilities, Umeå, Sweden.
Individuals aged 65 and older with a dementia diagnosis, a Mini-Mental State Examination score of 10 or greater, and dependence in ADLs (N = 186).
Ninety-three participants each were allocated to the high-intensity functional exercise program, comprising lower limb strength and balance exercises, and 93 to a seated control activity.
Blinded assessors measured ADL independence using the Functional Independence Measure (FIM) and Barthel Index (BI) and balance using the Berg Balance Scale (BBS) at baseline and 4 (directly after intervention completion) and 7 months.
Linear mixed models showed no between-group effect on ADL independence at 4 (FIM=1.3, 95% confidence interval (CI)=-1.6-4.3; BI=0.6, 95% CI=-0.2-1.4) or 7 (FIM=0.8, 95% CI=-2.2-3.8; BI=0.6, 95% CI=-0.3-1.4) months. A significant between-group effect on balance favoring exercise was observed at 4 months (BBS=4.2, 95% CI=1.8-6.6). In interaction analyses, exercise effects differed significantly between dementia types. Positive between-group exercise effects were found in participants with non-Alzheimer's dementia according to the FIM at 7 months and BI and BBS at 4 and 7 months.
In older people with mild to moderate dementia living in residential care facilities, a 4-month high-intensity functional exercise program appears to slow decline in ADL independence and improve balance, albeit only in participants with non-Alzheimer's dementia.
PubMed ID
26782852 View in PubMed
Less detail

Effects of Exercise on Cognitive Function in Older People with Dementia: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291732
Source
J Alzheimers Dis. 2017; 60(1):323-332
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Date
2017
Author
Annika Toots
Håkan Littbrand
Gustaf Boström
Carl Hörnsten
Henrik Holmberg
Lillemor Lundin-Olsson
Nina Lindelöf
Peter Nordström
Yngve Gustafson
Erik Rosendahl
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
Source
J Alzheimers Dis. 2017; 60(1):323-332
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cognition Disorders - etiology - rehabilitation
Dementia - complications
Exercise - physiology
Exercise Therapy - methods
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Status Schedule
Neuropsychological Tests
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Abstract
Although physical exercise has been suggested to influence cognitive function, previous exercise studies show inconsistent results in people with dementia.
To investigate effects of exercise on cognitive function in people with dementia.
The Umeå Dementia and Exercise (UMDEX) study, a cluster-randomized controlled trial, was set in 16 nursing homes in Umeå, Sweden. One hundred-and-forty-one women and 45 men with dementia; mean age of 85 y and mean Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score of 15, were randomized to a High-Intensity Functional Exercise program or a seated attention control activity. Blinded assessors measured global cognitive function using the MMSE and the Alzheimer's disease Assessment Scale - Cognitive subscale (ADAS-Cog), and executive function using Verbal fluency (VF) at baseline and 4 months (directly after intervention completion), and MMSE and VF at 7 months.
Linear mixed models showed no between-group effects in mean difference from baseline (95% confidence intervals, CI) at 4 months in MMSE (-0.27; 95% CI -1.4 to 0.87, p?=?0.644), ADAS-Cog (-1.04, 95% CI -4 to 1.92, p?=?0.491), or VF (-0.53, 95% CI -1.42 to 0.35, p?=?0.241) or at 7 months in MMSE (-1.15, 95% CI -2.32 to 0.03, p?=?0.056) or VF (-0.18, 95% CI -1.09 to 0.74, p?=?0.707).
A 4-month, high-intensity functional exercise program had no superior effects on global cognition or executive function in people with dementia living in nursing homes when compared with an attention control activity.
Notes
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2016 Apr;64(4):731-8 PMID 27037872
Cites: Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord. 2010;29(2):109-14 PMID 20150731
Cites: J Gerontol B Psychol Sci Soc Sci. 1998 Jul;53(4):S209-17 PMID 9679522
Cites: J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 2010 Dec;81(12):1363-8 PMID 20881017
Cites: Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2016 Aug;31(8):868-78 PMID 26644304
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2009 Jul;41(7):1510-30 PMID 19516148
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2013 May 31;(5):CD004744 PMID 23728651
Cites: Eur J Neurol. 2016 Mar;23 (3):527-41 PMID 26662508
Cites: Exerc Sport Sci Rev. 2012 Jul;40(3):153-8 PMID 22504726
Cites: Neurology. 1989 Sep;39(9):1159-65 PMID 2771064
Cites: J Am Med Dir Assoc. 2016 May 1;17(5):381-92 PMID 27012368
Cites: Arch Med Res. 2012 Nov;43(8):615-21 PMID 23085449
Cites: Neurosci Biobehav Rev. 2016 May;64:326-45 PMID 26915926
Cites: BMC Med Res Methodol. 2007 Jul 03;7:30 PMID 17608932
Cites: JAMA. 1963 Sep 21;185:914-9 PMID 14044222
Cites: Med Care. 1992 Jun;30(6):473-83 PMID 1593914
Cites: Phys Ther. 2006 Apr;86(4):489-98 PMID 16579666
Cites: Alzheimers Dement. 2016 Dec;12 (12 ):1207-1215 PMID 27344641
Cites: J Alzheimers Dis. 2015 ;50(2):443-53 PMID 26682695
Cites: Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2015 Nov;23(11):1106-16 PMID 25648055
Cites: Lancet Neurol. 2014 Aug;13(8):788-94 PMID 25030513
Cites: J Psychiatr Res. 1975 Nov;12(3):189-98 PMID 1202204
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2012 Feb 15;(2):CD005562 PMID 22336813
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2015 Apr 15;(4):CD006489 PMID 25874613
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2016 Jan;64(1):55-64 PMID 26782852
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 1998 Jun;30(6):975-91 PMID 9624661
Cites: J Am Med Dir Assoc. 2017 Mar 1;18(3):227-233 PMID 27810267
Cites: Arq Neuropsiquiatr. 2014 Mar;72(3):190-6 PMID 24676435
Cites: JAMA. 2015 Aug 25;314(8):781-90 PMID 26305648
Cites: J Sci Med Sport. 2016 Apr;19(4):293-8 PMID 26087884
Cites: PLoS One. 2015 May 14;10(5):e0126102 PMID 25974049
Cites: Am J Alzheimers Dis Other Demen. 2011 Aug;26(5):381-8 PMID 21852281
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2005 Oct;53(10):1681-7 PMID 16181166
Cites: J Alzheimers Dis. 2014;41(2):615-31 PMID 24662102
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2015 Apr 22;(4):CD005381 PMID 25900537
Cites: Arch Psychiatr Nurs. 2006 Feb;20(1):12-20 PMID 16442470
Cites: Scand J Caring Sci. 2012 Mar;26(1):12-9 PMID 21564154
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 1984 Nov;141(11):1356-64 PMID 6496779
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2011 Feb 15;108(7):3017-22 PMID 21282661
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 1992 Sep;40(9):922-35 PMID 1512391
PubMed ID
28800328 View in PubMed
Less detail

Effects of Exercise on Cognitive Function in Older People with Dementia: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284826
Source
J Alzheimers Dis. 2017;60(1):323-332
Publication Type
Article
Date
2017
Author
Annika Toots
Håkan Littbrand
Gustaf Boström
Carl Hörnsten
Henrik Holmberg
Lillemor Lundin-Olsson
Nina Lindelöf
Peter Nordström
Yngve Gustafson
Erik Rosendahl
Source
J Alzheimers Dis. 2017;60(1):323-332
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Although physical exercise has been suggested to influence cognitive function, previous exercise studies show inconsistent results in people with dementia.
To investigate effects of exercise on cognitive function in people with dementia.
The Ume? Dementia and Exercise (UMDEX) study, a cluster-randomized controlled trial, was set in 16 nursing homes in Ume?, Sweden. One hundred-and-forty-one women and 45 men with dementia; mean age of 85 y and mean Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score of 15, were randomized to a High-Intensity Functional Exercise program or a seated attention control activity. Blinded assessors measured global cognitive function using the MMSE and the Alzheimer's disease Assessment Scale - Cognitive subscale (ADAS-Cog), and executive function using Verbal fluency (VF) at baseline and 4 months (directly after intervention completion), and MMSE and VF at 7 months.
Linear mixed models showed no between-group effects in mean difference from baseline (95% confidence intervals, CI) at 4 months in MMSE (-0.27; 95% CI -1.4 to 0.87, p?=?0.644), ADAS-Cog (-1.04, 95% CI -4 to 1.92, p?=?0.491), or VF (-0.53, 95% CI -1.42 to 0.35, p?=?0.241) or at 7 months in MMSE (-1.15, 95% CI -2.32 to 0.03, p?=?0.056) or VF (-0.18, 95% CI -1.09 to 0.74, p?=?0.707).
A 4-month, high-intensity functional exercise program had no superior effects on global cognition or executive function in people with dementia living in nursing homes when compared with an attention control activity.
Notes
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2016 Apr;64(4):731-827037872
Cites: Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord. 2010;29(2):109-1420150731
Cites: J Gerontol B Psychol Sci Soc Sci. 1998 Jul;53(4):S209-179679522
Cites: J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 2010 Dec;81(12):1363-820881017
Cites: Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2016 Aug;31(8):868-7826644304
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2009 Jul;41(7):1510-3019516148
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2013 May 31;(5):CD00474423728651
Cites: Eur J Neurol. 2016 Mar;23 (3):527-4126662508
Cites: Exerc Sport Sci Rev. 2012 Jul;40(3):153-822504726
Cites: Neurology. 1989 Sep;39(9):1159-652771064
Cites: J Am Med Dir Assoc. 2016 May 1;17(5):381-9227012368
Cites: Arch Med Res. 2012 Nov;43(8):615-2123085449
Cites: Neurosci Biobehav Rev. 2016 May;64:326-4526915926
Cites: BMC Med Res Methodol. 2007 Jul 03;7:3017608932
Cites: JAMA. 1963 Sep 21;185:914-914044222
Cites: Med Care. 1992 Jun;30(6):473-831593914
Cites: Phys Ther. 2006 Apr;86(4):489-9816579666
Cites: Alzheimers Dement. 2016 Dec;12 (12 ):1207-121527344641
Cites: J Alzheimers Dis. 2015 ;50(2):443-5326682695
Cites: Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2015 Nov;23(11):1106-1625648055
Cites: Lancet Neurol. 2014 Aug;13(8):788-9425030513
Cites: J Psychiatr Res. 1975 Nov;12(3):189-981202204
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2012 Feb 15;(2):CD00556222336813
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2015 Apr 15;(4):CD00648925874613
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2016 Jan;64(1):55-6426782852
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 1998 Jun;30(6):975-919624661
Cites: J Am Med Dir Assoc. 2017 Mar 1;18(3):227-23327810267
Cites: Arq Neuropsiquiatr. 2014 Mar;72(3):190-624676435
Cites: JAMA. 2015 Aug 25;314(8):781-9026305648
Cites: J Sci Med Sport. 2016 Apr;19(4):293-826087884
Cites: PLoS One. 2015 May 14;10(5):e012610225974049
Cites: Am J Alzheimers Dis Other Demen. 2011 Aug;26(5):381-821852281
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2005 Oct;53(10):1681-716181166
Cites: J Alzheimers Dis. 2014;41(2):615-3124662102
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2015 Apr 22;(4):CD00538125900537
Cites: Arch Psychiatr Nurs. 2006 Feb;20(1):12-2016442470
Cites: Scand J Caring Sci. 2012 Mar;26(1):12-921564154
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 1984 Nov;141(11):1356-646496779
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2011 Feb 15;108(7):3017-2221282661
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 1992 Sep;40(9):922-351512391
PubMed ID
28800328 View in PubMed
Less detail

End users transforming experiences into formal information and process models for personalised health interventions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262986
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2014;205:378-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Helena Lindgren
Lillemor Lundin-Olsson
Petra Pohl
Marlene Sandlund
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2014;205:378-82
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - prevention & control
Adult
Aged
Computer simulation
Focus Groups - methods
Humans
Individualized Medicine - methods
Middle Aged
Models, organizational
Models, Theoretical
Needs Assessment - organization & administration
Process Assessment (Health Care) - methods
Sweden
Abstract
Five physiotherapists organised a user-centric design process of a knowledge-based support system for promoting exercise and preventing falls. The process integrated focus group studies with 17 older adults and prototyping. The transformation of informal medical and rehabilitation expertise and older adults' experiences into formal information and process models during the development was studied. As tool they used ACKTUS, a development platform for knowledge-based applications. The process became agile and incremental, partly due to the diversity of expectations and preferences among both older adults and physiotherapists, and the participatory approach to design and development. In addition, there was a need to develop the knowledge content alongside with the formal models and their presentations, which allowed the participants to test hands-on and evaluate the ideas, content and design. The resulting application is modular, extendable, flexible and adaptable to the individual end user. Moreover, the physiotherapists are able to modify the information and process models, and in this way further develop the application. The main constraint was found to be the lack of support for the initial phase of concept modelling, which lead to a redesigned user interface and functionality of ACKTUS.
PubMed ID
25160210 View in PubMed
Less detail

Exercise effects on backward walking speed in people with dementia: A randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature303680
Source
Gait Posture. 2021 Jan 13; 85:65-70
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-13-2021
Author
Annika Toots
Lillemor Lundin-Olsson
Peter Nordström
Yngve Gustafson
Erik Rosendahl
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy, Umeå University, Umeå University, 901 87, Umeå, Sweden. Electronic address: annika.toots@umu.se.
Source
Gait Posture. 2021 Jan 13; 85:65-70
Date
Jan-13-2021
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Multidirectional walking, including backward walking, is integral to daily activities, and seems particularly challenging in older age, and in people with pathology affecting postural control such as dementia.
Does exercise influence backward walking speed in people with dementia, when tested using habitual walking aids and without, and do effects differ according to walking aid use?
This study included 141 women and 45 men (mean age 85 years) with dementia from the Umeå Dementia and Exercise (UMDEX), a cluster-randomized controlled trial study set in 16 nursing homes in Umeå, Sweden. Participants were randomized to a High-Intensity Functional Exercise (HIFE) program targeting lower limb strength-, balance and mobility exercise or to a seated attention control activity. Blinded assessors measured 2.4-meter usual backward walking speed, at baseline, 4 - (intervention completion) and 7-month follow-up; tested 1) with habitual walking aids allowed, and 2) without walking aids.
Linear mixed models showed no between-group effect in either backward walking speed test at 4 or 7 months; test 1) 0.005 m/s, P = .788 and -0.006 m/s, P = .754 and test 2) 0.030 m/s, P = .231 and 0.015 m/s, P = .569, respectively. In interaction analyses, exercise effects differed significantly between participants who habitually walked unaided compared with those that used a walking aid at 7 months (0.094 m/s, P = .027).
In this study of older people with dementia living in nursing homes, the effects of exercise had no overall effects on backwards walking speed. Nevertheless, some benefit was indicated in participants who habitually walked unaided, which is promising and merits further investigation in future studies.
PubMed ID
33517038 View in PubMed
Less detail

26 records – page 1 of 3.