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23 records – page 1 of 3.

Adverse events in psychiatry: a national cohort study in Sweden with a unique psychiatric trigger tool.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature307049
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2020 02 04; 20(1):44
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
02-04-2020
Author
Lena Nilsson
Madeleine Borgstedt-Risberg
Charlotta Brunner
Ullakarin Nyberg
Urban Nylén
Carina Ålenius
Hans Rutberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden. lena.nilsson@regionostergotland.se.
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2020 02 04; 20(1):44
Date
02-04-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Medical Errors
Patient Safety
Psychiatry
Retrospective Studies
Sweden
Abstract
The vast majority of patient safety research has focused on somatic health care. Although specific adverse events (AEs) within psychiatric healthcare have been explored, the overall level and nature of AEs is sparsely investigated.
Cohort study using a retrospective record review based on a two-step trigger tool methodology in the charts of randomly selected patients 18?years or older admitted to the psychiatric acute care departments in all Swedish regions from January 1 to June 30, 2017. Hospital care together with corresponding outpatient care were reviewed as a continuum, over a maximum of 3?months. The AEs were categorised according to type, severity and preventability.
In total, the medical records of 2552 patients were reviewed. Among the patients, 50.4% were women and 49.6% were men. The median (range) age was 44 (18-97) years for women and 44.5 (18-93) years for men. In 438 of the reviewed records, 720 AEs were identified, corresponding to the AEs identified in 17.2% [95% confidence interval, 15.7-18.6] of the records. The majority of AEs resulted in less or moderate harm, and 46.2% were considered preventable. Prolonged disease progression and deliberate self-harm were the most common types of AEs. AEs were significantly more common in women (21.5%) than in men (12.7%) but showed no difference between age groups. Severe or catastrophic harm was found in 2.3% of the records, and the majority affected were women (61%). Triggers pointing at deficient quality of care were found in 78% of the records, with the absence of a treatment plan being the most common.
AEs are common in psychiatric care. Aside from further patient safety work, systematic interventions are also warranted to improve the quality of psychiatric care.
PubMed ID
32019518 View in PubMed
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A/H1N1 antibodies and TRIB2 autoantibodies in narcolepsy patients diagnosed in conjunction with the Pandemrix vaccination campaign in Sweden 2009-2010.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259020
Source
J Autoimmun. 2014 May;50:99-106
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2014
Author
Alexander Lind
Anita Ramelius
Tomas Olsson
Lisen Arnheim-Dahlström
Favelle Lamb
Mohsen Khademi
Aditya Ambati
Markus Maeurer
Anna-Lena Nilsson
Izaura Lima Bomfim
Katharina Fink
Åke Lernmark
Source
J Autoimmun. 2014 May;50:99-106
Date
May-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Antibodies, Viral - blood
Autoantibodies - blood
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Gene Expression
Glutamate Decarboxylase - antagonists & inhibitors - genetics - immunology
HLA-DQ beta-Chains - genetics - immunology
Humans
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype - immunology
Influenza Vaccines - adverse effects - immunology
Influenza, Human - immunology - prevention & control
Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins - antagonists & inhibitors - genetics - immunology
Male
Middle Aged
Narcolepsy - chemically induced - diagnosis - genetics - immunology
Pandemics - prevention & control
Sweden
Vaccination - adverse effects
Abstract
Narcolepsy is a lifelong sleep disorder related to hypocretin deficiency resulting from a specific loss of hypocretin-producing neurons in the lateral hypothalamic area. The disease is thought to be autoimmune due to a strong association with HLA-DQB1*06:02. In 2009 the World Health Organization (WHO) declared the H1N1 2009 flu pandemic (A/H1N1PDM09). In response to this, the Swedish vaccination campaign began in October of the same year, using the influenza vaccine Pandemrix(?). A few months later an excess of narcolepsy cases was observed. It is still unclear to what extent the vaccination campaign affected humoral autoimmunity associated with narcolepsy. We studied 47 patients with narcolepsy (6-69 years of age) and 80 healthy controls (3-61 years of age) selected after the Pandemrix vaccination campaign. The first aim was to determine antibodies against A/H1N1 and autoantibodies to Tribbles homolog 2 (TRIB2), a narcolepsy autoantigen candidate as well as to GAD65 and IA-2 as disease specificity controls. The second aim was to test if levels and frequencies of these antibodies and autoantibodies were associated with HLA-DQB1*06:02. In?vitro transcribed and translated [(35)S]-methionine and -cysteine-labeled influenza A virus (A/California/04/2009/(H1N1)) segment 4 hemagglutinin was used to detect antibodies in a radiobinding assay. Autoantibodies to TRIB2, GAD65 and IA-2 were similarly detected in standard radiobinding assays. The narcolepsy patients had higher median levels of A/H1N1 antibodies than the controls (p?=?0.006). A/H1N1 antibody levels were higher among the
PubMed ID
24485154 View in PubMed
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[An unusual type of hemolysis in Tarui disease in two families originated in the county of Vasterbotten]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29129
Source
Lakartidningen. 2006 Mar 1-7;103(9):657-60
Publication Type
Article

Association between lumbopelvic pain, disability and sick leave during pregnancy – a comparison of three Scandinavian cohorts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104413
Source
J Rehabil Med. 2014 May;46(5):468-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2014
Author
Annelie Gutke
Christina B Olsson
Nina Völlestad
Birgitta Öberg
Lena Nilsson Wikmar
Hilde Stendal Robinson
Source
J Rehabil Med. 2014 May;46(5):468-74
Date
May-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Disabled persons - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Low Back Pain - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Pelvic Pain - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Prevalence
Sick Leave - statistics & numerical data
Social Security - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To explore the association between disability and sick leave due to lumbopelvic pain in pregnant women in 3 cohorts in Sweden and Norway and to explore possible factors of importance to sick leave. A further aim was to compare the prevalence of sick leave due to lumbopelvic pain.
Pregnant women (n = 898) from two cohorts in Sweden and one in Norway answered to questionnaires in gestational weeks 10–24; two of the cohorts additionally in weeks 28–38.
Logistic regression models were performed with sick leave due to lumbopelvic pain as dependent factor. Disability, pain, age, parity, cohort, civilian status, and occupational classification were independents factors.
In gestational weeks 10–24 the regression model included 895 cases; 38 on sick leave due to lumbopelvic pain. Disability, pain and cohort affiliation were associated with sick leave. In weeks 28–38, disability, pain and occupation classification were the significant factors. The prevalence of lumbopelvic pain was higher in Norway than in Sweden (65%, vs 58% and 44%; p
PubMed ID
24763944 View in PubMed
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Combined analysis of risk factors for SUDEP.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100900
Source
Epilepsia. 2011 Jun;52(6):1150-1159
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Dale C Hesdorffer
Torbjorn Tomson
Emma Benn
Josemir W Sander
Lena Nilsson
Yvonne Langan
Thaddeus S Walczak
Ettore Beghi
Martin J Brodie
Allen Hauser
Author Affiliation
Columbia University, New York, New York, U.S.A. Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden UCL Institute of Neurology, Queen Square, London, United Kingdom SEIN - Epilepsy Institute in the Netherlands Foundation, Heemstede, The Netherlands Department of Neurological Rehabilitation, Stora Sköndal Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, U.S.A. Mario Negri Institute, Milan, Italy University of Glasgow, Glasgow, United Kingdom.
Source
Epilepsia. 2011 Jun;52(6):1150-1159
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Purpose: To pool data from four published case-control studies of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) with live controls, to increase the power to determine risk factors. Methods: Case-control studies from the United States, Sweden, Scotland, and England were combined. SUDEP was defined as (1) a history of epilepsy (>1 epileptic seizure during a period of
PubMed ID
21671925 View in PubMed
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Determinants for lumbopelvic pain 6 months postpartum.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130569
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2012;34(5):416-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Christina B Olsson
Lena Nilsson-Wikmar
Wilhelmus J A Grooten
Author Affiliation
Primärvårdsrehab Serafen, Stockholm, Sweden. christina.b.olsson@sll.se
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2012;34(5):416-22
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Catastrophization
Cross-Sectional Studies
Disability Evaluation
Fear - psychology
Female
Humans
Low Back Pain - psychology
Motor Activity
Pain Measurement
Pelvic Pain - physiopathology - psychology
Postpartum Period - psychology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - physiopathology - psychology
Pregnancy Trimester, Second
Proportional Hazards Models
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Self Report
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Abstract
To evaluate potential determinants of self-reported lumbopelvic pain 6 months postpartum for pregnant women with and without lumbopelvic pain.
Questionnaires were answered in weeks 19-21 of pregnancy and at 6 months postpartum. The Pain Catastrophizing Scale was used to assess exaggerated negative thoughts about pain experiences, the Fear-Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire to assess beliefs about how physical activity affects back pain, the Visual Analogue Scale to assess pain intensity, the Disability Rating Index to assess physical ability, and the Nottingham Health Profile to assess health-related quality of life. A Cox proportional hazards model was used to analyse the data.
Of the 273 women who answered at both occasions, 112 had lumbopelvic pain in pregnancy and 161 did not. For pregnant women with lumbopelvic pain a higher level of catastrophizing and a more restricted physical ability both doubled the risk for postpartum lumbopelvic pain.
We conclude that catastrophizing and physical ability, in weeks 19-21 of pregnancy determine postpartum lumbopelvic pain, and hence that, women at risk might be identified by the use of a biopsychosocial approach in pregnancy. It seems important to take these results into consideration both when forming preventive strategies and in rehabilitation.
PubMed ID
21988673 View in PubMed
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The final assessment and its association with field assessment in patients who were transported by the emergency medical service.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298892
Source
Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2018 Dec 27; 26(1):111
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-27-2018
Author
Carl Magnusson
Christer Axelsson
Lena Nilsson
Anneli Strömsöe
Monica Munters
Johan Herlitz
Magnus Andersson Hagiwara
Author Affiliation
Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, University of Gothenburg and Sahlgrenska University Hospital, SE-405 30, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2018 Dec 27; 26(1):111
Date
Dec-27-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Ambulances
Diagnosis, Differential
Emergency medical services
Female
Humans
International Classification of Diseases
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Discharge
Reproducibility of Results
Retrospective Studies
Sweden
Symptom Assessment
Abstract
In patients who call for the emergency medical service (EMS), there is a knowledge gap with regard to the final assessment after arriving at hospital and its association with field assessment.
In a representative population of patients who call for the EMS, to describe a) the final assessment at hospital discharge and b) the association between the assessment in the field and the assessment at hospital discharge.
Thirty randomly selected patients reached by a dispatched ambulance each month between 1 Jan and 31 Dec 2016 in one urban, one rural and one mixed ambulance organisation in Sweden took part in the study. The exclusion criteria were age?
PubMed ID
30587210 View in PubMed
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Incidence of adverse events in Sweden during 2013-2016: a cohort study describing the implementation of a national trigger tool.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298615
Source
BMJ Open. 2018 03 30; 8(3):e020833
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
03-30-2018
Author
Lena Nilsson
Madeleine Borgstedt-Risberg
Michael Soop
Urban Nylén
Carina Ålenius
Hans Rutberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
Source
BMJ Open. 2018 03 30; 8(3):e020833
Date
03-30-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Medical Errors - statistics & numerical data
Medical Records
Middle Aged
Patient Safety
Quality Indicators, Health Care
Reproducibility of Results
Retrospective Studies
Safety Management
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
To describe the implementation of a trigger tool in Sweden and present the national incidence of adverse events (AEs) over a 4-year period during which an ongoing national patient safety initiative was terminated.
Cohort study using retrospective record review based on a trigger tool methodology.
Patients =18 years admitted to all somatic acute care hospitals in Sweden from 2013 to 2016 were randomised into the study.
Primary outcome measure was the incidence of AEs, and secondary measures were type of injury, severity of harm, preventability of AEs, estimated healthcare cost of AEs and incidence of AEs in patients cared for in another type of unit than the one specialised for their medical needs ('off-site').
In a review of 64 917 admissions, the average AE rates in 2014 (11.6%), 2015 (10.9%) and 2016 (11.4%) were significantly lower than in 2013 (13.1%). The decrease in the AE rates was seen in different age groups, in both genders and for preventable and non-preventable AEs. The decrease comprised only the least severe AEs. The types of AEs that decreased were hospital-acquired infections, urinary bladder distention and compromised vital signs. Patients cared for 'off-site' had 84% more preventable AEs than patients cared for in the appropriate units. The cost of increased length of stay associated with preventable AEs corresponded to 13%-14% of the total cost of somatic hospital care in Sweden.
The rate of AEs in Swedish somatic hospitals has decreased from 2013 to 2016. Retrospective record review can be used to monitor patient safety over time, to assess the effects of national patient safety interventions and analyse challenges to patient safety such as the increasing care of patients 'off-site'. It was found that the economic burden of preventable AEs is high.
PubMed ID
29602858 View in PubMed
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Islet autoantibodies present in association with Ljungan virus infection in bank voles (Myodes glareolus) in northern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285551
Source
J Med Virol. 2017 Jan;89(1):24-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2017
Author
Anna Warvsten
Martin Björnfors
Michael Arvidsson
Fariba Vaziri-Sani
Ida Jönsson
Gert E Olsson
Clas Ahlm
Helena Elding Larsson
Ã?ke Lernmark
Anna-Lena Nilsson
Source
J Med Virol. 2017 Jan;89(1):24-31
Date
Jan-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Arvicolinae
Autoantibodies - blood
Female
Glutamate Decarboxylase - immunology
Insulin - immunology
Male
Parechovirus - isolation & purification
Picornaviridae Infections - immunology - veterinary - virology
Receptor-Like Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases, Class 8 - immunology
Rodent Diseases - immunology - pathology - virology
Sweden
Abstract
Bank voles are known reservoirs for Puumala hantavirus and probably also for Ljungan virus (LV), a suggested candidate parechovirus in type 1 diabetes etiology and pathogenesis. The aim of this study was to determine whether wild bank voles had been exposed to LV and if exposure associated to autoantibodies against insulin (IAA), glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GADA), or islet autoantigen-2 (IA-2A). Serum samples from bank voles (Myodes glareolus) captured in early summer or early winter of 1997 and 1998, respectively, were analyzed in radio binding assays for antibodies against Ljungan virus (LVA) and Puumala virus (PUUVA) as well as for IAA, GADA, and IA-2A. LVA was found in 25% (189/752), IAA in 2.5% (18/723), GADA in 2.6% (15/615), and IA-2A in 2.5% (11/461) of available bank vole samples. LVA correlated with both IAA (P?=?0.007) and GADA (P?
PubMed ID
27283793 View in PubMed
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23 records – page 1 of 3.