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Psychological symptoms and self-image of patients with complaints attributed to dental restorative materials.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295669
Source
Clin Oral Investig. 2018 Oct 27; :
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-27-2018
Author
Lena Mårell
Jan Bergdahl
Anders Tillberg
Berndt Stenberg
Anders Berglund
Author Affiliation
Department of Odontology, Umeå University, S-901 87, Umeå, Sweden. lena.marell@umu.se.
Source
Clin Oral Investig. 2018 Oct 27; :
Date
Oct-27-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
The aim was to study self-image and the level of psychological symptoms in patients with symptoms attributed to their dental restorative materials.
A questionnaire containing questions regarding dental and medical history was answered by 257 participants, one group with local oral symptoms only (LSO), and one group with multi-symptoms (M-S). A reference group was randomly selected from a research database at the Department of Psychology, Umeå University, Sweden. The self-image was assessed using the Structural Analysis of Social Behavior (SASB). Psychological symptoms such as somatization, depression, and anxiety were assessed using the Symptom Check List 90 (SCL-90) and the Global Severity Index (GSI) was used to determine the level of psychological symptoms.
SASB showed that the M-S group and the LSO-group scored significantly higher on the "spontaneous" and "positive self-image" than the reference group. In the SCL-90, the M-S group scored significantly higher than the LSO-group and the references on the somatization subscales. On depression, anxiety, and the GSI scale, the M-S group scored significantly higher than the reference group.
The two subgroups scored significantly higher on the SASB Spontaneous and Positive clusters which indicates that these patients have an excessively positive self-image, are very spontaneous and have an overconfidence in themselves compared to the reference group. In the M-S group there was a clear tendency to somatization, depression, and anxiety and they were more psychologically stressed than the reference group.
Among the patients with illness attributed to their dental materials, the M-S-patients had a significantly higher level of general psychological distress and somatization than the control group which may lead to mental stress.
PubMed ID
30368660 View in PubMed
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Streptococcus Mutans Adhesin Biotypes that Match and Predict Individual Caries Development.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292481
Source
EBioMedicine. 2017 Oct; 24:205-215
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Date
Oct-2017
Author
Anders Esberg
Nongfei Sheng
Lena Mårell
Rolf Claesson
Karina Persson
Thomas Borén
Nicklas Strömberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Odontology/cariology, Umeå University, SE-901 87 Umeå, Sweden.
Source
EBioMedicine. 2017 Oct; 24:205-215
Date
Oct-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Keywords
Adhesins, Bacterial - classification - genetics - metabolism
Adolescent
Child
Collagen - metabolism
Dental Caries - diagnosis - metabolism - microbiology
Humans
Precision Medicine
Prospective Studies
Receptors, Cell Surface - metabolism
Saliva - chemistry
Sequence Analysis, RNA - methods
Streptococcus mutans - genetics - isolation & purification - metabolism
Sweden
Abstract
Dental caries, which affects billions of people, is a chronic infectious disease that involves Streptococcus mutans, which is nevertheless a poor predictor of individual caries development. We therefore investigated if adhesin types of S.mutans with sucrose-independent adhesion to host DMBT1 (i.e. SpaP A, B or C) and collagen (i.e. Cnm, Cbm) match and predict individual differences in caries development. The adhesin types were measured in whole saliva by qPCR in 452 12-year-old Swedish children and related to caries at baseline and prospectively at a 5-year follow-up. Strains isolated from the children were explored for genetic and phenotypic properties. The presence of SpaP B and Cnm subtypes coincided with increased 5-year caries increment, and their binding to DMBT1 and saliva correlated with individual caries scores. The SpaP B subtypes are enriched in amino acid substitutions that coincided with caries and binding and specify biotypes of S. mutans with increased acid tolerance. The findings reveal adhesin subtypes of S. mutans that match and predict individual differences in caries development and provide a rationale for individualized oral care.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28958656 View in PubMed
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