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Approximal caries increment in adolescents after a visual aid in combination with a comprehensive open discussion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121529
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2013 May-Jul;71(3-4):676-82
Publication Type
Article
Author
Anita Häggblom
Aron Naimi-Akbar
Agneta Lith
Lena Karlsson
Author Affiliation
Division of Dental Biomaterials and Cariology, Department of Dental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2013 May-Jul;71(3-4):676-82
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Audiovisual Aids
Case-Control Studies
Dental Caries - prevention & control
Humans
Radiography, Dental
Sweden
Abstract
To achieve greater motivation for behavioural changes; educating, motivating and supporting the patient's ability to change lifestyle factors related to the caries disease are important tasks in the prevention of the disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether a visual aid (Visual Caries Dialogue, VCD) in combination with a comprehensive open discussion has a beneficial effect on approximal caries development among a population of young adolescents.
The study subjects were randomized to either an intervention group (n = 118), where VCD was conducted, or a control group (n = 112) receiving traditional oral healthcare information, at the annual dental health examination. The number of caries lesions reaching through the entire enamel (D2) and dentin caries reaching through the enamel into the dentin (D3) were recorded from bitewing radiographs each year, from 2001-2004. Differences between the study groups regarding at least two new approximal surfaces with caries (D2-D3) were tested using logistic regression.
The caries increment was lower in the intervention group compared to the control group. During the 3-year follow-up, 18 (15.3%) patients in the intervention group and 40 (35.7%) patients in the control group demonstrated a DS-approximal increment of at least two surfaces with a risk ratio of 2.34 (95% CI = 1.43-3.83).
Visual Caries Dialogue in combination with a comprehensive open discussion reduced approximal caries increment among young individuals. The method provides an innovative simple and low-cost way of delivering information to patients and guides busy dental healthcare personnel in the approach.
PubMed ID
22900665 View in PubMed
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The association between cold extremes and neonatal mortality in Swedish Sápmi from 1800 to 1895.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301300
Source
Glob Health Action. 2019; 12(1):1623609
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2019
Author
Lena Karlsson
Erling Lundevaller
Barbara Schumann
Author Affiliation
a Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR) , Umeå University , Umeå , Sweden.
Source
Glob Health Action. 2019; 12(1):1623609
Date
2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Background: Studies in which the association between temperature and neonatal mortality (deaths during the first 28 days of life) is tracked over extended periods that cover demographic, economic and epidemiological transitions are quite limited. From previous research about the demographic transition in Swedish Sápmi, we know that infant and child mortality was generally higher among the indigenous (Sami) population compared to non-indigenous populations. Objective: The aim of this study was to analyse the association between extreme temperatures and neonatal mortality among the Sami and non-Sami population in Swedish Sápmi (Lapland) during the nineteenth century. Methods: Data from the Demographic Data Base, Umeå University, were used to identify neonatal deaths. We used monthly mean temperature in Tornedalen and identified cold and warm month (5th and 95th) percentiles. Monthly death counts from extreme temperatures were modelled using negative binomial regression. We computed relative risks (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI), adjusting for time trends and seasonality. Results: Overall, the neonatal mortality rate was higher among Sami compared to non-Sami infants (62/1,000 vs 35/1,000 live births), although the differences between the two populations decreased after 1860. For the Sami population prior 1860, the results revealed a higher neonatal incidence rate during cold winter months (
PubMed ID
31232229 View in PubMed
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Climate vulnerability of Swedish newborns: Gender differences and time trends of temperature-related neonatal mortality, 1880-1950.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature304298
Source
Environ Res. 2021 Jan; 192:110400
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-2021
Author
Johan Junkka
Lena Karlsson
Erling Lundevaller
Barbara Schumann
Author Affiliation
Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research, Umeå University, 901 87, Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Environ Res. 2021 Jan; 192:110400
Date
Jan-2021
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
In resource-poor societies, neonatal mortality (death in the first 28 days of life) is usually very high. Young infants are particularly vulnerable to environmental health risks, which are modified by socioeconomic factors that change over time. We investigated the association between ambient temperature and neonatal mortality in northern Sweden during the demographic transition.
Parish register data and temperature data in coastal Västerbotten, Sweden, between 1880 and 1950 were used. Total and sex-specific neonatal mortality was modelled as a function of mean temperature, adjusting for age, seasonality and calendar time, using discrete-time survival analysis. A linear threshold function was applied with a cut point at 14.5 °C (the minimum mortality temperature). Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were computed. Further analyses were stratified by study period (1800-1899, 1900-1929, and 1930-1950).
Neonatal mortality was 32.1 deaths/1000 live births, higher in boys than in girls, and decreased between 1880 and 1950, with high inter-annual variability. Mean daily temperature was +2.5 °C, ranging from -40.9 °C to +28.8 °C. At -20 °C, the OR of neonatal death was 1.56 (CI 1.30-1.87) compared to the reference at +14.5 °C. Among girls, the OR of mortality at -20 °C was 1.17 (0.88-1.54), and among boys, it was 1.94 (1.53-2.45). A temperature increase from +14.5 to +20 °C was associated with a 25% increase of neonatal mortality (OR 1.25, CI 1.04-1.50). Heat- and cold-related risks were lowest between 1900 and 1929.
In this remote sub-Arctic region undergoing socio-economic changes, we found an increased mortality risk in neonates related to low but also to high temperature. Climate vulnerability varied across time and was particularly high among boys. This demonstrates that environmental impacts on human health are complex and highly dependent on the specific local context, with many, often unknown, contributing determinants of vulnerability.
PubMed ID
33129863 View in PubMed
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Climate vulnerability of Swedish newborns: Gender differences and time trends of temperature-related neonatal mortality, 1880-1950.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature311776
Source
Environ Res. 2021 01; 192:110400
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-2021
Author
Johan Junkka
Lena Karlsson
Erling Lundevaller
Barbara Schumann
Author Affiliation
Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research, Umeå University, 901 87, Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Environ Res. 2021 01; 192:110400
Date
01-2021
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Climate
Female
Hot Temperature
Humans
Infant
Infant mortality
Infant, Newborn
Male
Mortality
Sex Characteristics
Sweden - epidemiology
Temperature
Abstract
In resource-poor societies, neonatal mortality (death in the first 28 days of life) is usually very high. Young infants are particularly vulnerable to environmental health risks, which are modified by socioeconomic factors that change over time. We investigated the association between ambient temperature and neonatal mortality in northern Sweden during the demographic transition.
Parish register data and temperature data in coastal Västerbotten, Sweden, between 1880 and 1950 were used. Total and sex-specific neonatal mortality was modelled as a function of mean temperature, adjusting for age, seasonality and calendar time, using discrete-time survival analysis. A linear threshold function was applied with a cut point at 14.5 °C (the minimum mortality temperature). Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were computed. Further analyses were stratified by study period (1800-1899, 1900-1929, and 1930-1950).
Neonatal mortality was 32.1 deaths/1000 live births, higher in boys than in girls, and decreased between 1880 and 1950, with high inter-annual variability. Mean daily temperature was +2.5 °C, ranging from -40.9 °C to +28.8 °C. At -20 °C, the OR of neonatal death was 1.56 (CI 1.30-1.87) compared to the reference at +14.5 °C. Among girls, the OR of mortality at -20 °C was 1.17 (0.88-1.54), and among boys, it was 1.94 (1.53-2.45). A temperature increase from +14.5 to +20 °C was associated with a 25% increase of neonatal mortality (OR 1.25, CI 1.04-1.50). Heat- and cold-related risks were lowest between 1900 and 1929.
In this remote sub-Arctic region undergoing socio-economic changes, we found an increased mortality risk in neonates related to low but also to high temperature. Climate vulnerability varied across time and was particularly high among boys. This demonstrates that environmental impacts on human health are complex and highly dependent on the specific local context, with many, often unknown, contributing determinants of vulnerability.
PubMed ID
33129863 View in PubMed
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Indigenous Infant Mortality by Age and Season of Birth, 1800-1899: Did Season of Birth Affect Children's Chances for Survival?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295887
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2017 12 23; 15(1):
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Date
12-23-2017
Author
Lena Karlsson
Author Affiliation
Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research, Umeå University, Umeå 90187, Sweden. lena.karlsson@umu.se.
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2017 12 23; 15(1):
Date
12-23-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Keywords
Female
History, 19th Century
Humans
Infant
Infant Mortality - history
Infant, Newborn
Male
Parturition
Population Groups - history - statistics & numerical data
Pregnancy
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk
Seasons
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
This paper focuses on the influence of season of birth on infant mortality among the Sami and non-Sami populations in northern Sweden during the nineteenth century. The source material is a set of data files from the Demographic Data Base at Umeå University, making it possible to combine age at death (in days), month of death, and month of birth over the course of the entire century. Cox regression models reveal that for the first week of life, season of birth had no influence on the risk of mortality. For the Sami, the results showed that being born during winter was related to a higher risk of neonatal mortality, and being born during summer was related to a higher risk of mortality after six months of age. Furthermore, for the Sami, the neonatal mortality showed a U-shaped pattern with a minimum in June-August, whereas the corresponding pattern among the non-Sami was flatter. The findings shed light on vulnerability in two populations sharing the same environment, but diverging in terms of social, economic, and cultural factors.
Notes
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Cites: Demography. 1975 Feb;12(1):35-55 PMID 1089568
PubMed ID
29295484 View in PubMed
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Indigenous Infant Mortality by Age and Season of Birth, 1800-1899: Did Season of Birth Affect Children's Chances for Survival?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288010
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2017 Dec 23;15(1)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-23-2017
Author
Lena Karlsson
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2017 Dec 23;15(1)
Date
Dec-23-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
This paper focuses on the influence of season of birth on infant mortality among the Sami and non-Sami populations in northern Sweden during the nineteenth century. The source material is a set of data files from the Demographic Data Base at Umeå University, making it possible to combine age at death (in days), month of death, and month of birth over the course of the entire century. Cox regression models reveal that for the first week of life, season of birth had no influence on the risk of mortality. For the Sami, the results showed that being born during winter was related to a higher risk of neonatal mortality, and being born during summer was related to a higher risk of mortality after six months of age. Furthermore, for the Sami, the neonatal mortality showed a U-shaped pattern with a minimum in June-August, whereas the corresponding pattern among the non-Sami was flatter. The findings shed light on vulnerability in two populations sharing the same environment, but diverging in terms of social, economic, and cultural factors.
Notes
Cites: Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2014 Jul 07;11(7):6940-5425003551
Cites: Popul Stud (Camb). 1990 Jul;44(2):273-8511622323
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2001 Feb 27;98(5):2934-911226344
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2003 Apr;32(2):286-9412714551
Cites: Lancet. 2000 Feb 5;355(9202):451-510841125
Cites: PLoS One. 2013;8(2):e5642523457566
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1999 Jun;48(12):1821-3210405019
Cites: J Clin Virol. 2016 Nov;84:59-6327723525
Cites: Glob Health Action. 2011;4:null22043216
Cites: Demography. 2010 Feb;47(1):23-4320355682
Cites: Biodemography Soc Biol. 2015 ;61(2):209-3026266973
Cites: Am J Public Health Nations Health. 1945 Sep;35(9):913-2218016226
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2008 Feb;67(1):27-4218468257
Cites: Popul Stud (Camb). 2001 Nov;55(3):213-3211778618
Cites: Demography. 1975 Feb;12(1):35-551089568
PubMed ID
29295484 View in PubMed
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Infant mortality of Sami and settlers in Northern Sweden: the era of colonization 1750-1900.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130015
Source
Glob Health Action. 2011 ; 4 : 33-40.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
  1 document  
Author
Peter Sköld
Per Axelsson
Lena Karlsson
Len Smith
Source
Glob Health Action. 2011 ; 4 : 33-40.
Date
2011
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
File Size
348758
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Female
Health status
History, 18th Century
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
Humans
Infant Mortality - history - trends
Infant, Newborn
Male
Parity
Population Groups - history - statistics & numerical data
Pregnancy
Sweden
Demography
Indigenous peoples
Seasonality
Sami
Vulnerability
Abstract
The study deals with infant mortality (IMR) that is one of the most important aspects of indigenous vulnerability.
The Sami are one of very few indigenous peoples with an experience of a positive mortality transition.
Using unique mortality data from the period 1750-1900 Sami and the colonizers in northern Sweden are compared in order to reveal an eventual infant mortality transition.
The results show ethnic differences with the Sami having higher IMR, although the differences decrease over time. There were also geographical and cultural differences within the Sami, with significantly lower IMR among the South Sami. Generally, parity has high explanatory value, where an increased risk is noted for children born as number five or higher among siblings.
There is a striking trend of decreasing IMR among the Sami after 1860, which, however, was not the result of professional health care. Other indigenous peoples of the Arctic still have higher mortality rates, and IMR below 100 was achieved only after 1950 in most countries. The decrease in Sami infant mortality was certainly an important factor in their unique health transition, but the most significant change occurred after 1900.
Notes
Cites: Bull World Health Organ. 2001;79(2):159-6011242823
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2004;32(5):390-515513673
Cites: Milbank Mem Fund Q. 1971 Oct;49(4):509-385155251
Cites: J Biosoc Sci. 2001 Jan;33(1):67-8611316396
Cites: Lancet. 2009 Jul 4;374(9683):76-8519577696
Cites: Lancet. 2006 Jun 17;367(9527):2019-2816782493
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2008 Feb;67(1):27-4218468257
Cites: Lancet. 2009 Jul 4;374(9683):65-7519577695
Cites: Soc Hist Med. 1988 Dec;1(3):329-5811621729
PubMed ID
22043216 View in PubMed
Documents

Skold-Vulnerable_populations.pdf

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Neonatal Mortality and Temperature in Two Northern Swedish Rural Parishes, 1860-1899-The Significance of Ethnicity and Gender.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature306885
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2020 02 13; 17(4):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
02-13-2020
Author
Lena Karlsson
Erling H Lundevaller
Barbara Schumann
Author Affiliation
Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR), Umeå University, 901 87 Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2020 02 13; 17(4):
Date
02-13-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Animals
Ethnic Groups
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant Mortality - ethnology
Male
Pregnancy
Sweden - epidemiology
Temperature
Vulnerable Populations
Weather
Abstract
The aim of this study was to analyze the association between season of birth and daily temperature for neonatal mortality in two Swedish rural parishes between 1860 and 1899. Further, we aimed to study whether the association varied according to ethnicity (indigenous Sami reindeer herders and non-Sami settlers) and gender. The source material for this study comprised digitized parish records from the Demographic Data Base, Umeå University, combined with local weather data provided by the Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute. Using a time event-history approach, we investigated the association between daily temperature (at birth and up to 28 days after birth) and the risk of neonatal death during the coldest months (November through March). The results showed that Sami neonatal mortality was highest during winter and that the Sami neonatal mortality risk decreased with higher temperatures on the day of birth. Male neonatal risk decreased with higher temperatures during the days following birth, while no effect of temperature was observed among female neonates. We conclude that weather vulnerability differed between genders and between the indigenous and non-indigenous populations.
PubMed ID
32070044 View in PubMed
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Out-of-hospital cardiac arrests in children and adolescents: incidences, outcomes, and household socioeconomic status.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269129
Source
Resuscitation. 2015 Mar;88:12-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2015
Author
Shahzleen Rajan
Mads Wissenberg
Fredrik Folke
Carolina Malta Hansen
Freddy K Lippert
Peter Weeke
Lena Karlsson
Kathrine Bach Søndergaard
Kristian Kragholm
Erika Frischknecht Christensen
Søren L Nielsen
Lars Kober
Gunnar H Gislason
Christian Torp-Pedersen
Source
Resuscitation. 2015 Mar;88:12-9
Date
Mar-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark - epidemiology
Emergency medical services
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Male
Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest - economics - epidemiology - therapy
Registries
Socioeconomic Factors
Survival Rate - trends
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
There is insufficient knowledge of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) in the very young.
This nationwide study sought to examine age-stratified OHCA characteristics and the role of parental socioeconomic differences and its contribution to mortality in the young population.
All OHCA patients in Denmark, =21 years of age, were identified from 2001 to 2010. The population was divided into infants (
PubMed ID
25500748 View in PubMed
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Season of birth, stillbirths, and neonatal mortality in Sweden: the Sami and non-Sami population, 1800-1899.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature309426
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2019 12; 78(1):1629784
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
12-2019
Author
Lena Karlsson
Erling Häggström Lundevaller
Barbara Schumann
Author Affiliation
a Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR) , Umeå University , Umeå , Sweden.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2019 12; 78(1):1629784
Date
12-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Breast Feeding - ethnology
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant Mortality - ethnology - trends
Male
Seasons
Socioeconomic Factors
Stillbirth - ethnology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Seasonal patterns of neonatal mortality and stillbirths have been found around the world. However, little is known about the association between season of birth and infant mortality of pre-industrial societies in a subarctic environment. In this study, we compared how season of birth affected the neonatal and stillbirth risk among the Sami and non-Sami in Swedish Sápmi during the nineteenth century. Using digitised parish records from the Demographic Data Base at Umeå University, we applied logistic regression models for estimating the association of season of birth with stillbirths and neonatal mortality, respectively. Higher neonatal mortality was found among the winter- and autumn-born Sami, compared to summer-born infants. Stillbirth risk was higher during autumn compared to summer among the Sami, whereas we found no seasonal differences in mortality among the non-Sami population. We relate the higher neonatal mortality risk among winter-born Sami to differences in seasonality of living conditions associated with reindeer herding.
PubMed ID
31221048 View in PubMed
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15 records – page 1 of 2.