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Call-related factors influencing output power from mobile phones.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76221
Source
J Expo Sci Environ Epidemiol. 2006 May 3;
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-3-2006
Author
Lena Hillert
Anders Ahlbom
David Neasham
Maria Feychting
Lars Järup
Roshan Navin
Paul Elliott
Author Affiliation
[1] aInstitute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden [2] bDepartment of Public Health Sciences, Division of Occupational Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden [3] cStockholm Centre for Public Health, Stockholm County Council, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
J Expo Sci Environ Epidemiol. 2006 May 3;
Date
May-3-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Mobile phone use is increasing but there is also concern for adverse health effects. Well-designed prospective studies to assess several health outcomes are required. In designing a study of mobile phone use, it is important to assess which factors need to be considered in classifying the exposure to radiofrequency fields (RF). A pilot study was performed in Sweden and in the UK 2002 to 2003 to test the feasibility of recruiting a cohort of mobile phone users from a random population sample and from mobile phone subscription lists for a prospective study. As one part of this pilot study, different factors were evaluated regarding possible influence on the output power of the phones. By local switch logging, information on calls made from predefined subscriptions or dedicated handsets were obtained and the output power of phones during calls made indoors and outdoors, in moving and stationary mode, and in rural as well in urban areas were compared. In this experiment, calls were either 1, 1.5 or 5 min long. The results showed that high mobile phone output power is more frequent in rural areas whereas the other factors (length of call, moving/stationary, indoor/outdoor) were of less importance. Urban and rural area should be considered in an exposure index for classification of the exposure to RF from mobile phones and may be assessed by first base station during mobile phone calls or, if this information is not available, possibly by using home address as a proxy.Journal of Exposure Science and Environmental Epidemiology advance online publication, 3 May 2006; doi:10.1038/sj.jes.7500485.
PubMed ID
16670713 View in PubMed
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Environmental illness--effectiveness of a salutogenic group-intervention programme.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71554
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2002;30(3):166-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Lena Hillert
Pirjo Savlin
Adrienne Levy Berg
Anna Heidenberg
Birgitta Kolmodin-Hedman
Author Affiliation
Division of Occupational Medicine, Department of Public Health Sciences, Korolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. lena.hillert@medhs.ki.se
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2002;30(3):166-75
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Comparative Study
Electromagnetic fields - adverse effects
Environmental Illness - psychology - therapy
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Physical Therapy Modalities
Program Evaluation
Psychotherapy, Group
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Somatoform Disorders - epidemiology - prevention & control
Sweden
Abstract
AIMS: Hypersensitivity to electricity (HE) is a common form of reported environmental illness in Sweden. Functional somatic symptoms has been attributed to exposure to activated electrical equipment, but no causal relationship to electromagnetic fields has been proved. In many cases, traumatic life events and psychosocial stress can be identified, but patients often reject psychological explanations. This study evaluates the effectiveness of a new short-term group-intervention programme. METHODS: A multidisciplinary team developed a short-term group-intervention programme, with a salutogenic approach that focuses on somatic and psychological reactions. Twenty-two patients (14 women and 8 men) who reported HE participated in eight weekly sessions of group meetings and physiotherapy. The effect of the programme was evaluated with regard to changes in work capacity, subjective well-being, coping ability, body awareness and physical fitness. RESULTS: Contrary to our hypothesis physical fitness was not remarkably low. Muscular tension was reduced and body awareness increased but no significant change in symptoms was observed. Individual differences in progress were observed. Fourteen patients chose to continue with psychotherapy or physiotherapy. CONCLUSIONS: Participants accepted the programme very well. One important result was identification of underlying contributing factors and motivation for further therapy. A multidisciplinary group-intervention programme with a salutogenic approach might be a useful approach to patients with medically unexplained symptoms in primary healthcare.
PubMed ID
12357983 View in PubMed
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Headache, tinnitus and hearing loss in the international Cohort Study of Mobile Phone Use and Health (COSMOS) in Sweden and Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature310291
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2019 10 01; 48(5):1567-1579
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
10-01-2019
Author
Anssi Auvinen
Maria Feychting
Anders Ahlbom
Lena Hillert
Paul Elliott
Joachim Schüz
Hans Kromhout
Mireille B Toledano
Christoffer Johansen
Aslak Harbo Poulsen
Roel Vermeulen
Sirpa Heinävaara
Katja Kojo
Giorgio Tettamanti
Author Affiliation
Environmental Surveillance and Emergency Preparedness, STUK - Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2019 10 01; 48(5):1567-1579
Date
10-01-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Cell Phone
Cell Phone Use - statistics & numerical data
Electromagnetic fields - adverse effects
Environmental Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland
Headache - etiology
Hearing loss - etiology
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Radio Waves - adverse effects
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Time Factors
Tinnitus - etiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Mobile phone use and exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF) from it have been associated with symptoms in some studies, but the studies have shortcomings and their findings are inconsistent. We conducted a prospective cohort study to assess the association between amount of mobile phone use at baseline and frequency of headache, tinnitus or hearing loss at 4-year follow-up.
The participants had mobile phone subscriptions with major mobile phone network operators in Sweden (n?=?21?049) and Finland (n?=?3120), gave consent for obtaining their mobile phone call data from operator records at baseline, and filled in both baseline and follow-up questionnaires on symptoms, potential confounders and further characteristics of their mobile phone use.
The participants with the highest decile of recorded call-time (average call-time >276?min per week) at baseline showed a weak, suggestive increased frequency of weekly headaches at 4-year follow-up (adjusted odds ratio 1.13, 95% confidence interval 0.95-1.34). There was no obvious gradient of weekly headache with increasing call-time (P trend 0.06). The association of headache with call-time was stronger for the Universal Mobile Telecommunications System (UMTS) network than older Global System for Mobile Telecommunications (GSM) technology, despite the latter involving higher exposure to RF-EMF. Tinnitus and hearing loss showed no association with call-time.
People using mobile phones most extensively for making or receiving calls at baseline reported weekly headaches slightly more frequently at follow-up than other users, but this finding largely disappeared after adjustment for confounders and was not related to call-time in GSM with higher RF-EMF exposure. Tinnitus and hearing loss were not associated with amount of call-time.
PubMed ID
31302690 View in PubMed
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Long-term effect of mobile phone use on sleep quality: Results from the cohort study of mobile phone use and health (COSMOS).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature306308
Source
Environ Int. 2020 07; 140:105687
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
07-2020
Author
Giorgio Tettamanti
Anssi Auvinen
Torbjörn Åkerstedt
Katja Kojo
Anders Ahlbom
Sirpa Heinävaara
Paul Elliott
Joachim Schüz
Isabelle Deltour
Hans Kromhout
Mireille B Toledano
Aslak Harbo Poulsen
Christoffer Johansen
Roel Vermeulen
Maria Feychting
Lena Hillert
Author Affiliation
Unit of Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Environ Int. 2020 07; 140:105687
Date
07-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Cell Phone
Cell Phone Use
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Electromagnetic fields - adverse effects
Environmental Exposure
Finland
Humans
Prospective Studies
Radio Waves - adverse effects
Sleep
Sweden
Abstract
Effects of radiofrequency electromagnetic field exposure (RF-EMF) from mobile phone use on sleep quality has mainly been investigated in cross-sectional studies. The few previous prospective cohort studies found no or inconsistent associations, but had limited statistical power and short follow-up. In this large prospective cohort study, our aim was to estimate the effect of RF-EMF from mobile phone use on different sleep outcomes.
The study included Swedish (n = 21,049) and Finnish (n = 3120) participants enrolled in the Cohort Study of Mobile Phone Use and Health (COSMOS) with information about operator-recorded mobile phone use at baseline and sleep outcomes both at baseline and at the 4-year follow-up. Sleep disturbance, sleep adequacy, daytime somnolence, sleep latency, and insomnia were assessed using the Medical Outcome Study (MOS) sleep questionnaire.
Operator-recorded mobile phone use at baseline was not associated with most of the sleep outcomes. For insomnia, an odds ratio (OR) of 1.24, 95% CI 1.03-1.51 was observed in the highest decile of mobile phone call-time (>258 min/week). With weights assigned to call-time to account for the lower RF-EMF exposure from Universal Mobile Telecommunications Service (UMTS, 3G) than from Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM, 2G) the OR was 1.09 (95% CI 0.89-1.33) in the highest call-time decile.
Insomnia was slightly more common among mobile phone users in the highest call-time category, but adjustment for the considerably lower RF-EMF exposure from the UMTS than the GSM network suggests that this association is likely due to other factors associated with mobile phone use than RF-EMF. No association was observed for other sleep outcomes. In conclusion, findings from this study do not support the hypothesis that RF-EMF from mobile phone use has long-term effects on sleep quality.
PubMed ID
32276731 View in PubMed
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Multiple chemical sensitivity in male painters; a controlled provocation study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature45864
Source
Int J Hyg Environ Health. 2003 Oct;206(6):531-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2003
Author
Antonis Georgellis
Birgitta Lindelöf
Anders Lundin
Bengt Arnetz
Lena Hillert
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, Stockholm County Council, Stockholm, Sweden. antonis.georgellis@smd.sll.se
Source
Int J Hyg Environ Health. 2003 Oct;206(6):531-8
Date
Oct-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects
Case-Control Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Chemical Sensitivity - epidemiology - etiology - pathology - psychology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - pathology - psychology
Paint - adverse effects
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The purpose of the present study was to examine whether male painters reporting multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS) differ from their matched controls (male painters without such sensitivity) during controlled chamber challenges to singular and mixtures of odorous chemicals with respect to: (1) Subjective rating of symptoms (i.e., symptoms related to central nervous system (CNS) and symptoms related to irritation) and sensations of smell elicited by low-level chemical exposures. (2) Changes in serum prolactin and cortisol levels, changes in nasal cavity and eye redness as a result of the various exposures. Moreover, background assessments were made regarding mental well-being, sense of coherence (SOC) as well as state of anxiety and depression in both groups. The MCS and control group consisted of 14 and 15 male painters respectively. Regarding background assessments of mental well-being, anxiety, depression and SOC, statistically significant differences were obtained between painters with MCS and their controls. During the controlled chamber challenges, neither difference regarding sensations of smell nor development of CNS related symptoms were seen between MCS and control group. In contrast, subjective rating of symptoms related to irritation (i.e., eyes, nose, throat, skin, and breathing difficulties) was significant higher in subjects with MCS. No differences between the groups as a result of the different exposures were seen concerning nasal cavity, eye redness and serum cortisol levels. However, a trend (P = 0.056) between the groups was measured regarding a decline of serum prolactin levels in the MCS group. This is a relatively small study with a limited number of volunteers; and no definitive conclusions can be drawn concerning the above findings. But it is the first controlled challenge study that incorporates similarly exposed groups (painters) recruited from a community rather than from a clinical population.
PubMed ID
14626900 View in PubMed
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Prevalence of self-reported hypersensitivity to electric or magnetic fields in a population-based questionnaire survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49193
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2002 Feb;28(1):33-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2002
Author
Lena Hillert
Niklas Berglind
Bengt B Arnetz
Tom Bellander
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Health, Norrbacka/Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. lena.hillert@medhs.ki.se
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2002 Feb;28(1):33-41
Date
Feb-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Chi-Square Distribution
Comparative Study
Confidence Intervals
Cross-Sectional Studies
Electricity - adverse effects
Electromagnetic fields - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Hypersensitivity - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Participation
Population Surveillance
Prevalence
Probability
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The prevalence of medically unexplained symptoms attributed to exposure to electromagnetic fields is still largely unknown. Previous studies have investigated reported hypersensitivity to electricity in selected groups recruited from workplaces or outpatient clinics. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of self-reported hypersensitivity to electric or magnetic fields in the general population and to describe characteristics of the group reporting such hypersensitivity with regard to demographics, other complaints, hypersensitivities, and traditional allergies. METHODS: A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was conducted in 1997 among 15,000 men and women between 19 and 80 years of age in Stockholm County. The response rate was 73%. RESULTS: One and a half percent of the respondents reported hypersensitivity to electric or magnetic fields. Prevalence was highest among women and in the 60- to 69-year age group. The hypersensitive group reported all symptoms, allergies, and other types of hypersensitivities included in the survey (as well as being disturbed by various factors in the home) to a significantly greater extent than the rest of the respondents. No specific symptom profile set off the hypersensitive group from the rest of the respondents. CONCLUSIONS: The results should be interpreted with caution. But they suggest that there is widespread concern among the general population about risks to health posed by electric and magnetic fields. More research is warranted to explore ill health among people reporting hypersensitivity to electric or magnetic fields.
PubMed ID
11871850 View in PubMed
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Sleep disturbances predict future sickness absence among individuals with lower back or neck-shoulder pain: a 5-year prospective study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265021
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2015 May;43(3):315-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
Katarina Aili
Teresia Nyman
Lena Hillert
Magnus Svartengren
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2015 May;43(3):315-23
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Forecasting
Humans
Low Back Pain - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Neck Pain - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Self Report
Shoulder Pain - epidemiology
Sick Leave - trends
Sleep Disorders - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Musculoskeletal pain is one of the most common causes of sickness absence. Sleep disturbances are often co-occurring with pain, but the relationship between sleep and pain is complex. Little is known about the importance of self-reported sleep, when predicting sickness absence among persons with musculoskeletal pain. This study aims to study the association between self-reported sleep quality and sickness absence 5 years later, among individuals stratified by presence of lower back pain (LBP) and neck and shoulder pain (NSP).
The cohort (n = 2286) in this 5-year prospective study (using data from the MUSIC-Norrtälje study) was stratified by self-reported pain into three groups: no LBP or NSP, solely LBP or NSP, and concurrent LBP and NSP. Odds ratios (ORs) for the effect of self-reported sleep disturbances at baseline on sickness absence (> 14 consecutive days), 5 years later, were calculated.
Within all three pain strata, individuals reporting the most sleep problems showed a significantly higher OR for all-cause sickness absence, 5 years later. The group with the most pronounced sleep problems within the concurrent LBP and NSP stratum had a significantly higher OR (OR 2.00; CI 1.09-3.67) also for long-term sickness absence (> 90 days) 5 years later, compared to the group with the best sleep. CONCLUSIONS Sleep disturbances predict sickness absence among individuals regardless of co-existing features of LBP and/or NSP. The clinical evaluation of patients should take possible sleep disturbances into account in the planning of treatments.
PubMed ID
25724467 View in PubMed
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7 records – page 1 of 1.