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Fusobacterium necrophorum- detection and identification on a selective agar.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100026
Source
APMIS. 2010 Dec;118(12):994-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Steffen Bank
Hanne Merete Nielsen
Boris Hoyer Mathiasen
Dorte Christiansen Leth
Lena Hagelskjaer Kristensen
Jørgen Prag
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Microbiology, Viborg Hospital, Denmark. stb@mb.au.dk
Source
APMIS. 2010 Dec;118(12):994-9
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Agar
Chi-Square Distribution
Child
Child, Preschool
DNA, Bacterial - chemistry - genetics
Fusobacterium Infections - microbiology
Fusobacterium necrophorum - genetics - isolation & purification
Histocytochemistry
Humans
Infant
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Microbiological Techniques - methods
Middle Aged
Pharyngitis - diagnosis - microbiology
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Sensitivity and specificity
Young Adult
Abstract
Within the last decade, Fusobacterium necrophorum subsp. funduliforme has been considered a clinically important pathogen causing pharyngitis especially in adolescents and young adults. F. necrophorum pharyngitis can progress into Lemierre's syndrome, which is a severe and life-threatening infection. However, throat swabs are not cultured anaerobically in the routine and even if cultured anaerobically, it can be difficult to identify F. necrophorum from the normal flora of the throat. F. necrophorum is therefore often overlooked as the cause of pharyngitis. In our laboratory, a F. necrophorum selective agar has been developed containing vancomycin and nalidixin, which inhibit the growth of most Gram-positive and many Gram-negative bacteria, respectively. ß-haemolysis of horse blood can be detected, which further facilitates the detection and identification of F. necrophorum. The F. necrophorum selective agar was evaluated against a quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction assay and shown to have a significantly higher sensitivity for detecting F. necrophorum than the anaerobic agar commonly used in Denmark. Furthermore, the F. necrophorum selective agar does not require experienced laboratory technicians, require fewer subcultures, is probably less expensive and is faster to perform than other culture methods.
PubMed ID
21091782 View in PubMed
Less detail

Fusobacterium necrophorum findings in Denmark from 2010 to 2014 using data from the Danish microbiology database.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279585
Source
APMIS. 2016 Dec;124(12):1087-1092
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2016
Author
Steffen Bank
Anders Jensen
Hanne Merete Nielsen
Lena Hagelskjaer Kristensen
Marianne Voldstedlund
Jørgen Prag
Source
APMIS. 2016 Dec;124(12):1087-1092
Date
Dec-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bacteremia - epidemiology - microbiology
Blood - microbiology
Carrier State - epidemiology - microbiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Fusobacterium Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Fusobacterium necrophorum - isolation & purification
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Otitis Media - epidemiology - microbiology
Pharynx - microbiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Fusobacterium necrophorum findings in Denmark and estimation of the incidence of F. necrophorum bacteraemia was described using data from the nationwide Danish microbiology database (MiBa). All microbiological reports on any Fusobacterium species in Denmark were extracted for a period of 5 years from 2010 to 2014 from MiBa and from the local department of clinical microbiology. The overall incidence of F. necrophorum bacteraemia from 2010 to 2014 was 2.8 cases per million/year vs 9.4 in the age group 15-24 years. F. necrophorum was rare in blood cultures from children and middle-aged patients and then raised again. However, 48 of 232 cases of Fusobacterium bacteraemia were not identified to species level, so the incidences of F. necrophorum bacteraemia may be underestimated in our study. F. necrophorum was found in throat swabs in the age group between 13 and 40 years and in otitis media in children below 2 years in those departments which performed anaerobic culture. The incidence of F. necrophorum bacteraemia found was comparable to earlier reported figures for Lemierre's syndrome. Fusobacterium bacteraemia should always be identified to species level.
PubMed ID
27704629 View in PubMed
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[Intestinal tuberculosis--a rare differential diagnosis of Crohn's disease in an ethnic Danish woman].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283115
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2015 Jun 29;177(27)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-29-2015
Author
Maria Joanna Alexandraki
Christian Wejse
Mette Esbjørn
Lena Hagelskjær Kristensen
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2015 Jun 29;177(27)
Date
Jun-29-2015
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antitubercular Agents - therapeutic use
Capsule Endoscopy
Crohn Disease - diagnosis
Denmark - ethnology
Diagnosis, Differential
Female
Humans
Ileum - diagnostic imaging - microbiology - pathology
Mycobacterium tuberculosis - isolation & purification
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Tuberculosis, Gastrointestinal - diagnosis - drug therapy
Abstract
We report a case of intestinal tuberculosis in a 42-year-old Danish woman with stomach pain, weight loss and diarrhoea for months suspective of Crohn's disease. She underwent hysterectomy where white, small nodules were found on the small intestine. Biopsies showed non-necrotizing granulomatous inflammation. Gastroscopy and colonoscopy were normal. Capsule endoscopy revealed small intestine ulcers and a stenosis. A CT scan of the abdomen confirmed stenosis and inflammation of terminal ileum. QuantiFERON-TB Gold Test was positive and Mycobacterium tuberculosis was detected in faeces cultures.
PubMed ID
26239740 View in PubMed
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Patients' answers to simple questions about treatment satisfaction and adherence and depression are associated with failure of HAART: a cross-sectional survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature7155
Source
AIDS Patient Care STDS. 2005 May;19(5):317-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2005
Author
Toke S Barfod
Jan Gerstoft
Lotte Rodkjaer
Court Pedersen
Henrik Nielsen
Aksel Møller
Lena Hagelskjaer Kristensen
Henrik T Sørensen
Niels Obel
Lena Hagelskajaer Kristensen
Author Affiliation
Rigshospitalet, University Hosital of Copenhagen, Denmark. Toke.barfod@dad1net.dk
Source
AIDS Patient Care STDS. 2005 May;19(5):317-25
Date
May-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Depressive Disorder - complications - epidemiology
Female
HIV Infections - drug therapy - epidemiology - psychology
Humans
Male
Patient compliance
Patient satisfaction
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Treatment Failure
Viral Load
Abstract
Psychosocial and behavioral factors have been shown to be associated with adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and treatment effectiveness. These factors have often been identified in selected populations through complex or time-consuming questionnaires. In this study we aimed at asking all the patients of a large population-based cohort receiving HAART a few short, explicit, and direct questions about these factors, and to examine the associations between their answers and prevalent treatment failure. All patients receiving HAART in western Denmark and central Copenhagen were offered participation. Participants answered a short, self-administered, anonymous questionnaire assessing psychosocial and behavioral factors and treatment adherence. Findings were linked with data on demographics, disease history, and treatment effect. Treatment failure was defined as two consecutive measurements of HIV-RNA above 400 copies per milliliter taken at least 14 days apart. Prevalence odds ratios were estimated by logistic regression. We found that a total of 887 of 1126 patients returned a completed questionnaire (response rate 79%). The overall rate of treatment failure in participants was 20%. Adjusted odds ratio estimates for treatment failure were 2.3 (confidence interval [CI] 1.3-4.3) for patients who stated poor treatment satisfaction, 2.1 (CI 1.2-3.7) for patients not fully disagreeing that they were depressed, and 2.8 (CI 1.5-5.4) for patients who stated to have been nonadherent within the preceding 4 days. Because of the cross-sectional nature of the study, causality could not be determined. These questions, however, may be relevant screening tools in clinical practice and in follow-up studies.
Notes
Erratum In: AIDS Patient Care STDS. 2005 Aug;19(8):544
PubMed ID
15916494 View in PubMed
Less detail

Rotavirus is frequent among adults hospitalised for acute gastroenteritis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280931
Source
Dan Med J. 2017 Jan;64(1)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2017
Author
Karen Rokkedal Lausch
Lena Westh
Lena Hagelskjær Kristensen
Jens Lindberg
Britta Tarp
Carsten Schade Larsen
Source
Dan Med J. 2017 Jan;64(1)
Date
Jan-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
C-Reactive Protein - metabolism
Campylobacter - isolation & purification
Campylobacter Infections - complications
Clostridium difficile - isolation & purification
Denmark
Enterocolitis, Pseudomembranous - complications
Feces - microbiology - virology
Female
Gastroenteritis - blood - microbiology - virology
Hospitalization
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Monitoring, Immunologic - adverse effects
Rotavirus - isolation & purification
Rotavirus Infections
Young Adult
Abstract
Rotavirus infection is the most common aetiology of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) among young children. In adults, diagnostics focus mainly on bacterial causes, though recent studies suggest that rotavirus is a frequent agent. The aim of this study was to examine the proportion of rotavirus in adults hospitalised with AGE and to identify possible predictors.
During a 24-month period from 1 May 2010 adults (> 15 years) with AGE admitted to one of four hospitals in the Central Denmark Region were examined for rotavirus with VIKIA Rota-Adeno rapid test in addition to routine culture for bacterial pathogens.
A total of 265 adult patients were included. 9.4% tested positive for rotavirus. Enteropathogenic bacteria were found in 24.5% of the cases. In the majority of cases (62.3%), no pathogen was found. Overall, rotavirus was the second-most frequent pathogen, exceeded only by Campylobacter spp. Immunosuppression and a C-reactive protein (CRP) below 50 mg/l (0-8 mg/l) were associated with rotavirus. The seasonality of rotavirus differed markedly from that of bacterial gastroenteritis.
Rotavirus is the second-most frequently identified pathogen in adults hospitalised with AGE. Close contact to children or travel activity does not predict rotavirus gastroenteritis, but immunosuppression and a CRP below 50 mg/l do. The seasonality of rotavirus differs from that of bacterial gastroenteritis, making rotavirus the most frequently identified cause of AGE in adults admitted to hospital in the colder months.
The trial was funded by an unrestricted grant from Sanofi Pasteur MSD.
not relevant.
PubMed ID
28007052 View in PubMed
Less detail

Testing for hepatitis B virus and HIV in patients with chronic hepatitis C: screening performance and outcome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262996
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2014 Oct;46(10):686-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2014
Author
Maria Bolther
Lars Skov Dalgaard
Lena Hagelskjaer Kristensen
Britta Damgaard Tarp
Søren Jensen-Fangel
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2014 Oct;46(10):686-92
Date
Oct-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Clinical Laboratory Techniques - utilization
Cohort Studies
Coinfection - diagnosis - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Female
HIV Infections - diagnosis - epidemiology
Hepatitis B - diagnosis - epidemiology
Hepatitis C, Chronic - complications
Hospitals, University
Humans
Male
Mass Screening - utilization
Prevalence
Serologic Tests - utilization
Young Adult
Abstract
Patients infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) and co-infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV) and/or human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are at increased risk for progression of liver disease. The aim of this study was to assess HBV and HIV screening performance and outcome in HCV patients followed at a Danish university hospital and affiliated regional outpatient clinics.
HBV and HIV serology data were extracted from a quality assurance database for the assessment of screening performance in patients diagnosed with chronic HCV infection during the period 1 January 1996 to 31 December 2011. Patients with incomplete and missing serology data had complementary serology tests performed to assess the prevalence of HBV and HIV co-infection and HBV immune status.
Among 624 HCV patients, 10 (2%) were co-infected with chronic HBV and 32 (5%) with HIV. Approximately half of the cohort were non-immune to HBV or had an unknown HBV serology status. Serology results consistent with resolved infection and HBV vaccination were found in 209 (33%) and 65 (10%) patients, respectively. During the 16-y observation period, HBV and HIV screening coverage at HCV diagnosis increased from 23% to 92% and from 38% to 80%, respectively.
Despite improvements throughout the study period, HBV and HIV serology screening remained incomplete. The majority of patients were either HBV non-immune or had an unknown HBV serology status. These findings thus call for a more proactive screening approach as well as an improved HBV vaccination strategy for patients with chronic HCV infection.
PubMed ID
25134654 View in PubMed
Less detail

Vertical transmission of hepatitis B virus during pregnancy and delivery in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285727
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2017 Feb;52(2):178-184
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2017
Author
Nina Weis
Susan Cowan
Sofie Hallager
Sandra Dröse
Lena Hagelskjær Kristensen
Karin Grønbæk
Janne Jensen
Jan Gerstoft
Lone G Madsen
Mette Rye Clausen
Suzanne Lunding
Britta D Tarp
Toke S Barfod
Stine Sloth
Dorte Kinggaard Holm
Jesper Jensen
Henrik Krarup
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2017 Feb;52(2):178-184
Date
Feb-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
DNA, Viral - blood
Databases, Factual
Denmark
Female
Hepatitis B Antibodies - blood
Hepatitis B Antigens - blood
Hepatitis B virus
Hepatitis B, Chronic - epidemiology - transmission
Humans
Infant
Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Logistic Models
Male
Mass Screening - methods
Pregnancy
Risk factors
Vaccination - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
In Denmark, pregnant women have been screened for hepatitis B virus (HBV) since 2005, and children born to HBV-infected mothers offered hepatitis B immunoglobulin at birth, vaccination against HBV at birth and after 1, 2 and 12 months. The purpose of this study was to determine the risk of vertical HBV transmission in children born to mothers with chronic HBV infection, to investigate the antibody response in the children and to investigate possible maternal predictive risk factors for HBV transmission.
Through the Danish Database for Hepatitis B and C, we identified 589 HBV-infected women who had given birth to 686 children, of whom 370 children were born to 322 women referred to hospital. 132 (36%) children, born to 109 mothers, were included in the study; 128 children had blood samples tested for HBsAg, anti-HBc (total), anti-HBs and HBV-DNA and four children had saliva samples tested for anti-HBc.
We found vertical HBV transmission in Denmark to be 2.3% [95% CI: 0.5, 6.5], a high proportion of HBsAg-negative children with low levels of anti-HBs (18.4%) and a high proportion (15.2%) with resolved HBV infection. No maternal risk factor was statistically significantly associated with HBV vertical transmission.
In a HBV low prevalence setting as Denmark, despite a national vaccination program, vertical HBV transmission occurred in 2.3% of children born to HBV-infected mothers. In addition, a high proportion of the children had insufficient anti-HBs levels and a high proportion had serological signs of resolved HBV infection.
Notes
Erratum In: Scand J Gastroenterol. 2017 Feb;52(2):i27924637
PubMed ID
27796133 View in PubMed
Less detail

7 records – page 1 of 1.