Skip header and navigation

Refine By

8 records – page 1 of 1.

Source
Alaska Medicine. 1971 April:47-50.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1971
Author
Lee, J.
Author Affiliation
U.S. Indian Health Service
Source
Alaska Medicine. 1971 April:47-50.
Date
1971
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Alaska Area Native Health Service
Health services
Hospitals
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1500.
Less detail

Arctic tundra soil bacterial communities active at subzero temperatures detected by stable isotope probing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature307949
Source
FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2020 02 01; 96(2):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
02-01-2020
Author
Preshita S Gadkari
Lora R McGuinness
Minna K Männistö
Lee J Kerkhof
Max M Häggblom
Author Affiliation
School of Environmental and Biological Sciences, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick NJ 08901, USA.
Source
FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2020 02 01; 96(2):
Date
02-01-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Bacteria - genetics - isolation & purification
Carbon
Climate change
Finland
Microbiota
Permafrost - microbiology
Phylogeny
RNA, Ribosomal, 16S
Soil Microbiology
Temperature
Tundra
Abstract
Arctic soils store vast amounts of carbon and are subject to intense climate change. While the effects of thaw on the composition and activities of Arctic tundra microorganisms has been examined extensively, little is known about the consequences of temperature fluctuations within the subzero range in seasonally frozen or permafrost soils. This study identified tundra soil bacteria active at subzero temperatures using stable isotope probing (SIP). Soils from Kilpisjärvi, Finland, were amended with 13C-cellobiose and incubated at 0, -4 and -16°C for up to 40 weeks. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis of 13C-labelled DNA revealed distinct subzero-active bacterial taxa. The SIP experiments demonstrated that diverse bacteria, including members of Candidatus Saccharibacteria, Melioribacteraceae, Verrucomicrobiaceae, Burkholderiaceae, Acetobacteraceae, Armatimonadaceae and Planctomycetaceae, were capable of synthesising 13C-DNA at subzero temperatures. Differences in subzero temperature optima were observed, for example, with members of Oxalobacteraceae and Rhizobiaceae found to be more active at 0°C than at -4°C or -16°C, whereas Melioribacteriaceae were active at all subzero temperatures tested. Phylogeny of 13C-labelled 16S rRNA genes from the Melioribacteriaceae, Verrucomicrobiaceae and Candidatus Saccharibacteria suggested that these taxa formed subzero-active clusters closely related to members from other cryo-environments. This study demonstrates that subzero temperatures impact active bacterial community composition and activity, which may influence biogeochemical cycles.
PubMed ID
31778159 View in PubMed
Less detail

The cost effectiveness of teriparatide as a first-line treatment for glucocorticoid-induced and postmenopausal osteoporosis patients in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119351
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2012;13:213
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Daniel R Murphy
Lee J Smolen
Timothy M Klein
Robert W Klein
Author Affiliation
Medical Decision Modeling Inc, 8909 Purdue Road, Suite 550, Indianapolis, IN 46268, USA. drm@mdm-inc.com
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2012;13:213
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Oral
Age Factors
Aged
Bone Density
Bone Density Conservation Agents - economics - therapeutic use
Computer simulation
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Diphosphonates - administration & dosage - economics
Drug Costs
Female
Glucocorticoids - adverse effects
Health Services - economics - utilization
Humans
Male
Models, Economic
Osteoporosis - chemically induced - diagnosis - drug therapy - economics - mortality
Osteoporosis, Postmenopausal - diagnosis - drug therapy - economics - mortality
Quality-Adjusted Life Years
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Factors
Spinal Fractures - economics - mortality - prevention & control
Sweden - epidemiology
Teriparatide - economics - therapeutic use
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
This paper presents the model and results to evaluate the use of teriparatide as a first-line treatment of severe postmenopausal osteoporosis (PMO) and glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis (GIOP). The study's objective was to determine if teriparatide is cost effective against oral bisphosphonates for two large and high risk cohorts.
A computer simulation model was created to model treatment, osteoporosis related fractures, and the remaining life of PMO and GIOP patients. Natural mortality and additional mortality from osteoporosis related fractures were included in the model. Costs for treatment with both teriparatide and oral bisphosphonates were included. Drug efficacy was modeled as a reduction to the relative fracture risk for subsequent osteoporosis related fractures. Patient health utilities associated with age, gender, and osteoporosis related fractures were included in the model. Patient costs and utilities were summarized and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) for teriparatide versus oral bisphosphonates and teriparatide versus no treatment were estimated.For each of the PMO and GIOP populations, two cohorts differentiated by fracture history were simulated. The first contained patients with both a historical vertebral fracture and an incident vertebral fracture. The second contained patients with only an incident vertebral fracture. The PMO cohorts simulated had an initial Bone Mineral Density (BMD) T-Score of -3.0. The GIOP cohorts simulated had an initial BMD T-Score of -2.5.
The ICERs for teriparatide versus bisphosphonate use for the one and two fracture PMO cohorts were €36,995 per QALY and €19,371 per QALY. The ICERs for teriparatide versus bisphosphonate use for the one and two fracture GIOP cohorts were €20,826 per QALY and €15,155 per QALY, respectively.
The selection of teriparatide versus oral bisphosphonates as a first-line treatment for the high risk PMO and GIOP cohorts evaluated is justified at a cost per QALY threshold of €50,000.
Notes
Cites: Rheumatology (Oxford). 2000 Dec;39(12):1383-911136882
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2000;11(8):669-7411095169
Cites: Endocrinol Metab Clin North Am. 2003 Mar;32(1):135-57, vii12699296
Cites: Bone. 2003 May;32(5):468-7312753862
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2004 Jan;15(1):38-4214593451
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2004 Oct 11;164(18):2024-3015477438
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2005 Jan;16(1):15-2515672210
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2005 May 3;142(9):734-4115867405
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2005 May;16(5):447-5515609073
Cites: Curr Med Res Opin. 2005 Jul;21(7):1027-3416004669
Cites: J Bone Miner Res. 2005 Sep;20(9):1507-1316059622
Cites: Joint Bone Spine. 2005 Dec;72(6):461-516326129
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2006 Feb;17(2):201-1116027955
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2006;17(11):1645-5216862397
Cites: Health Technol Assess. 2007 Mar;11(7):iii-iv, ix-xi, 1-23117311734
Cites: Curr Rheumatol Rep. 2007 Apr;9(1):50-617437668
Cites: Bone. 2007 Jun;40(6):1602-917433804
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2007 Nov 15;357(20):2028-3918003959
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2008 Apr;19(4):399-42818266020
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2009 Jun;20(6):853-6819271098
Cites: Calcif Tissue Int. 2009 Dec;85(6):484-9319823760
Cites: J Med Econ. 2010;13(3):381-9220604678
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2001 May 10;344(19):1434-4111346808
PubMed ID
23110626 View in PubMed
Less detail

Fossil and genomic evidence constrains the timing of bison arrival in North America.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280891
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2017 Mar 28;114(13):3457-3462
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-28-2017
Author
Duane Froese
Mathias Stiller
Peter D Heintzman
Alberto V Reyes
Grant D Zazula
André E R Soares
Matthias Meyer
Elizabeth Hall
Britta J L Jensen
Lee J Arnold
Ross D E MacPhee
Beth Shapiro
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2017 Mar 28;114(13):3457-3462
Date
Mar-28-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
The arrival of bison in North America marks one of the most successful large-mammal dispersals from Asia within the last million years, yet the timing and nature of this event remain poorly determined. Here, we used a combined paleontological and paleogenomic approach to provide a robust timeline for the entry and subsequent evolution of bison within North America. We characterized two fossil-rich localities in Canada's Yukon and identified the oldest well-constrained bison fossil in North America, a 130,000-y-old steppe bison, Bison cf. priscus We extracted and sequenced mitochondrial genomes from both this bison and from the remains of a recently discovered, ~120,000-y-old giant long-horned bison, Bison latifrons, from Snowmass, Colorado. We analyzed these and 44 other bison mitogenomes with ages that span the Late Pleistocene, and identified two waves of bison dispersal into North America from Asia, the earliest of which occurred ~195-135 thousand y ago and preceded the morphological diversification of North American bison, and the second of which occurred during the Late Pleistocene, ~45-21 thousand y ago. This chronological arc establishes that bison first entered North America during the sea level lowstand accompanying marine isotope stage 6, rejecting earlier records of bison in North America. After their invasion, bison rapidly colonized North America during the last interglaciation, spreading from Alaska through continental North America; they have been continuously resident since then.
PubMed ID
28289222 View in PubMed
Less detail

Fossil and genomic evidence constrains the timing of bison arrival in North America.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293078
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2017 03 28; 114(13):3457-3462
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Date
03-28-2017
Author
Duane Froese
Mathias Stiller
Peter D Heintzman
Alberto V Reyes
Grant D Zazula
André E R Soares
Matthias Meyer
Elizabeth Hall
Britta J L Jensen
Lee J Arnold
Ross D E MacPhee
Beth Shapiro
Author Affiliation
Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada T6G 2E3; duane.froese@ualberta.ca beth.shapiro@gmail.com.
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2017 03 28; 114(13):3457-3462
Date
03-28-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Keywords
Animals
Bison - classification - genetics - physiology
DNA, Mitochondrial - genetics
Fossils - history
Genome, Mitochondrial
Genomics
History, Ancient
North America
Phylogeny
Abstract
The arrival of bison in North America marks one of the most successful large-mammal dispersals from Asia within the last million years, yet the timing and nature of this event remain poorly determined. Here, we used a combined paleontological and paleogenomic approach to provide a robust timeline for the entry and subsequent evolution of bison within North America. We characterized two fossil-rich localities in Canada's Yukon and identified the oldest well-constrained bison fossil in North America, a 130,000-y-old steppe bison, Bison cf. priscus We extracted and sequenced mitochondrial genomes from both this bison and from the remains of a recently discovered, ~120,000-y-old giant long-horned bison, Bison latifrons, from Snowmass, Colorado. We analyzed these and 44 other bison mitogenomes with ages that span the Late Pleistocene, and identified two waves of bison dispersal into North America from Asia, the earliest of which occurred ~195-135 thousand y ago and preceded the morphological diversification of North American bison, and the second of which occurred during the Late Pleistocene, ~45-21 thousand y ago. This chronological arc establishes that bison first entered North America during the sea level lowstand accompanying marine isotope stage 6, rejecting earlier records of bison in North America. After their invasion, bison rapidly colonized North America during the last interglaciation, spreading from Alaska through continental North America; they have been continuously resident since then.
Notes
Cites: PLoS One. 2010 Nov 16;5(11):e14004 PMID 21103372
Cites: Science. 2004 Nov 26;306(5701):1561-5 PMID 15567864
Cites: Bioinformatics. 2013 Jul 1;29(13):1682-4 PMID 23613487
Cites: Mol Biol Evol. 2013 Mar;30(3):713-24 PMID 23180580
Cites: Cold Spring Harb Protoc. 2010 Jun;2010(6):pdb.prot5448 PMID 20516186
Cites: Nature. 2013 Jul 4;499(7456):74-8 PMID 23803765
Cites: Curr Biol. 2008 Feb 26;18(4):R157-8 PMID 18302915
Cites: Science. 2015 Nov 13;350(6262):805-9 PMID 26564853
Cites: Mol Biol Evol. 2004 Jul;21(7):1165-70 PMID 14739241
Cites: Nat Protoc. 2013 Apr;8(4):737-48 PMID 23493070
Cites: Mol Biol Evol. 2012 Jun;29(6):1695-701 PMID 22319168
Cites: Nature. 2014 Jan 16;505(7483):403-6 PMID 24305051
Cites: Science. 2012 Oct 12;338(6104):222-6 PMID 22936568
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2016 Jul 19;113(29):8057-63 PMID 27274051
Cites: Science. 2014 Jan 24;343(6169):1236573 PMID 24458647
Cites: Methods Mol Biol. 2012;840:1-11 PMID 22237515
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2013 Sep 24;110(39):15758-63 PMID 24019490
Cites: Mol Biol Evol. 2011 Feb;28(2):879-87 PMID 20889726
Cites: Mol Biol Evol. 2012 Aug;29(8):1969-73 PMID 22367748
Cites: Mol Biol Evol. 2000 Dec;17(12):1807-15 PMID 11110896
Cites: Science. 2009 Jul 17;325(5938):318-21 PMID 19608918
Cites: Nucleic Acids Res. 2014 Oct;42(18):e141 PMID 25100869
Cites: Mol Biol Evol. 2015 Sep;32(9):2433-40 PMID 26037535
Cites: Cold Spring Harb Perspect Biol. 2013 Jul 01;5(7):null PMID 23729639
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2007 Sep 11;104(37):14616-21 PMID 17715061
Cites: Mitochondrion. 2011 Jan;11(1):166-75 PMID 20870040
Cites: Mol Ecol Resour. 2010 Jul;10(4):677-83 PMID 21565072
Cites: PLoS Biol. 2005 Aug;3(8):e241 PMID 15974804
Cites: Bioinformatics. 2009 Jul 15;25(14):1754-60 PMID 19451168
Cites: Nucleic Acids Res. 2012 Jan;40(1):e3 PMID 22021376
Cites: Q Rev Biol. 1970 Mar;45(1):1-15 PMID 5446770
PubMed ID
28289222 View in PubMed
Less detail

Legionnaires' disease outbreak associated with a cruise liner, August 2003: epidemiological and microbiological findings.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79789
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2007 Jul;135(5):802-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2007
Author
Beyrer K.
Lai S.
Dreesman J.
Lee J V
Joseph C.
Harrison T.
Surman-Lee S.
Lück C.
Brodhun B.
Buchholz U.
Windorfer A.
Author Affiliation
Governmental Institute of Public Health of Lower Saxony, Hannover, Germany.
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2007 Jul;135(5):802-10
Date
Jul-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
SUMMARYEight cases of Legionnaires' disease were identified among the 215 German passengers after a cruise to the Nordic Sea in August 2003. An unmatched case-control study was conducted to identify risk factors and the source of infection. In total, eight passengers fulfilled the case definition, one of these died. Forty-two passengers served as controls. The attack rate was 4%. The mean age was 60 years for cases and 62 years for controls. Prolonged exposure to the spa pool seemed to be a risk factor of infection (OR 4.85, P=0.09). Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1, monoclonal antibody (mAb) subgroup 'Knoxville' was isolated from clinical and environmental samples. DNA sequence-based typing revealed that these isolates were indistinguishable from each other. The investigation showed the importance of an interdisciplinary approach of microbiology and epidemiology as not all sites on the ship that tested positive for L. pneumophila actually posed a relevant risk for the passengers.
PubMed ID
17109773 View in PubMed
Less detail

Risk factors for gallbladder surgery: a case-control study of Eskimo women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature340
Source
Unpublished. 14 pp.
Publication Type
Article
Date
[No date]
Author
Boss, L.P.
Bender, T.R.
Lee, J.
Author Affiliation
U.S. Centers for Disease Control
Source
Unpublished. 14 pp.
Date
[No date]
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Surgery
Cholecystectomy
Diet, general
Cholecystitis
Cholelithiasis
Carcinoma of the gall bladder
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 2568.
Less detail

Safeguard or mollycoddle? Medical student placements in Aboriginal communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130422
Source
Med J Aust. 2011 Oct 17;195(8):449-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-17-2011

8 records – page 1 of 1.