Skip header and navigation

Refine By

8 records – page 1 of 1.

Body weight dissatisfaction and communication with parents among adolescents in 24 countries: international cross-sectional survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152740
Source
BMC Public Health. 2009;9:52
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Haleama Al Sabbah
Carine A Vereecken
Frank J Elgar
Tonja Nansel
Katrin Aasvee
Ziad Abdeen
Kristiina Ojala
Namanjeet Ahluwalia
Lea Maes
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium. halimah.alsabbah@ugent.be
Source
BMC Public Health. 2009;9:52
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - physiology - psychology
Age Factors
Body Image
Body mass index
Body Weight
Canada
Child
Communication
Confidence Intervals
Cross-Sectional Studies
Europe
Female
Health Behavior
Humans
Internationality
Logistic Models
Male
Obesity - diagnosis - epidemiology
Overweight - epidemiology
Parent-Child Relations
Probability
Risk assessment
Self Concept
Sex Factors
United States
Abstract
Parents have significant influence on behaviors and perceptions surrounding eating, body image and weight in adolescents. The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence of body weight dissatisfaction, difficulty in communication with the parents and the relationship between communication with parents and adolescents' dissatisfaction with their body weight (dieting or perceived need to diet).
Survey data were collected from adolescents in 24 countries and regions in Europe, Canada, and the USA who participated in the cross-sectional 2001/2002 Health Behaviour of School-Aged Children (HBSC) study. The association between communication with parents and body weight dissatisfaction was examined using binary logistic regression analysis.
Body weight dissatisfaction was highly prevalent and more common among girls than boys, among overweight than non-overweight, and among older adolescents than younger adolescents. Difficulty in talking to father was more common than difficulty in talking to mother in all countries and it was greater among girls than among boys and increased with age. Difficulties in talking to father were associated with weight dissatisfaction among both boys and girls in most countries. Difficulties in talking to mother were rarely associated with body weight dissatisfaction among boys while among girls this association was found in most countries.
The findings suggest that enhanced parent communication might contribute in most countries to less body dissatisfaction in girls and better communication with the father can help avoiding body weight dissatisfaction in boys. Professionals working with adolescents and their families should help adolescents to have a healthy weight and positive body image and promote effective parent-adolescent communication.
Notes
Cites: BMJ. 2000 May 6;320(7244):1240-310797032
Cites: Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2008 Jan;162(1):17-2218180407
Cites: Adolescence. 2001 Summer;36(142):225-4011572302
Cites: J Adolesc Health. 2002 Aug;31(2):145-5312127384
Cites: Health Psychol. 2003 Jan;22(1):88-9812558206
Cites: J Pers Soc Psychol. 1990 April;58(4):644-6314570079
Cites: J Pers Soc Psychol. 1985 Apr;48(4):991-10013989677
Cites: Child Dev. 1992 Oct;63(5):1266-811446552
Cites: Adolescence. 1992 Winter;27(108):915-81471569
Cites: Addict Behav. 1993 Nov-Dec;18(6):681-98178706
Cites: Health Psychol. 1994 May;13(3):195-2128055855
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1995 May;85(5):695-7017733431
Cites: Psychol Med. 1996 Jan;26(1):51-618643763
Cites: Int J Eat Disord. 1998 Mar;23(2):153-99503240
Cites: Psychol Med. 1998 Nov;28(6):1443-559854285
Cites: Prev Med. 1999 Jan;28(1):40-509973587
Cites: Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 1999 Jul;153(7):741-710401809
Cites: J Adolesc Health. 1999 Aug;25(2):155-6510447043
Cites: Int J Eat Disord. 2004 Dec;36(4):389-40115558645
Cites: Behav Res Ther. 2005 May;43(5):653-6815865919
Cites: J Adolesc Health. 2005 Nov;37(5):371-516227121
Cites: J Nutr Educ Behav. 2005 Nov-Dec;37 Suppl 2:S133-4016246282
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2006 Jan;30(1):59-6616414425
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 2006 Apr;106(4):526-3216567147
Cites: J Adolesc Health. 2006 May;38(5):569-7416635769
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2007 Jan;10(1):16-2317212838
Cites: J Adolesc Health. 2001 Sep;29(3):170-611524215
PubMed ID
19200369 View in PubMed
Less detail

Development of family and dietary habits questionnaires: the assessment of family processes, dietary habits and adolescents' impulsiveness in Norwegian adolescents and their parents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260951
Source
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2014;11:130
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Mona Bjelland
Solveig E S Hausken
Ester F C Sleddens
Lene F Andersen
Hanne C Lie
Arnstein Finset
Lea Maes
Elisabeth L Melbye
Kari Glavin
Merete W Hanssen-Bauer
Nanna Lien
Source
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2014;11:130
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Beverages
Cross-Sectional Studies
Energy Metabolism
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Food Habits - psychology
Health Behavior
Humans
Impulsive Behavior
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Parent-Child Relations
Parenting
Parents
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweetening Agents
Vegetables
Abstract
There is a need for valid and comprehensive measures of parental influence on children's energy balance-related behaviours (EBRB). Such measures should be based on a theoretical framework, acknowledging the dynamic and complex nature of interactions occurring within a family. The aim of the Family & Dietary habits (F&D) project was to develop a conceptual framework identifying important and changeable family processes influencing dietary behaviours of 13-15 year olds. A second aim was to develop valid and reliable questionnaires for adolescents and their parents (both mothers and fathers) measuring these processes.
A stepwise approach was used; (1) preparation of scope and structure, (2) development of the F&D questionnaires, (3) the conducting of pilot studies and (4) the conducting of validation studies (assessing internal reliability, test-retest reliability and confirmatory factor analysis) using data from a cross-sectional study.
The conceptual framework includes psychosocial concepts such as family functioning, cohesion, conflicts, communication, work-family stress, parental practices and parental style. The physical characteristics of the home environment include accessibility and availability of different food items, while family meals are the sociocultural setting included. Individual characteristics measured are dietary intake (vegetables and sugar-sweetened beverages) and adolescents' impulsivity. The F&D questionnaires developed were tested in a test-retest (54 adolescents and 44 of their parents) and in a cross-sectional survey including 440 adolescents (13-15 year olds), 242 mothers and 155 fathers. The samples appear to be relatively representative for Norwegian adolescents and parents. For adolescents, mothers and fathers, the test-retest reliability of the dietary intake, frequencies of (family) meals, work-family stress and communication variables was satisfactory (ICC: 0.53-0.99). Barratt Impulsiveness Scale-Brief (BIS-Brief) was included, assessing adolescent's impulsivity. The internal reliability (Cronbach's alphas: 0.77/0.82) and test-retest reliability values (ICC: 0.74/0.77) of BIS-Brief were good.
The conceptual framework developed may be a useful tool in guiding measurement and assessment of the home food environment and family processes related to adolescents' dietary habits, in particular and for EBRBs more generally. The results support the use of the F&D questionnaires as psychometrically sound tools to assess family characteristics and adolescent's impulsivity.
Notes
Cites: Child Dev. 2010 Mar-Apr;81(2):636-5120438465
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2010;10:27620500859
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 2010 Jul;110(7):1036-4220630160
Cites: Clin Child Fam Psychol Rev. 2010 Sep;13(3):231-5320689989
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2010 Oct;13(10A):1729-3520883573
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2010 Nov;38(5 Suppl):38-5121062838
Cites: Pediatrics. 2011 Jun;127(6):e1565-7421536618
Cites: Int J Pediatr Obes. 2011 Jun;6(2-2):e12-2721657834
Cites: BMC Med Res Methodol. 2011;11:11321827703
Cites: Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2011 Oct;20(10):499-50821847620
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2012 Mar;15(3):379-8521835086
Cites: Eat Behav. 2012 Apr;13(2):150-322365801
Cites: J Nutr Educ Behav. 2012 Mar-Apr;44(2):132-922230473
Cites: Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2011;8:13622152048
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2012 Aug;75(3):496-50422591825
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2012 Aug;15(8):1380-9522269173
Cites: Eur J Nutr. 2012 Sep;51(6):637-6322684631
Cites: Int J Methods Psychiatr Res. 2012 Sep;21(3):195-20422836590
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2011 Dec;14(12):2156-6521729482
Cites: BMC Res Notes. 2012;5:43422888983
Cites: Appetite. 2013 Mar;62:110-823207187
Cites: Clin Psychol Rev. 2013 Mar;33(2):253-6223313762
Cites: Psychol Assess. 2013 Mar;25(1):216-2623148649
Cites: Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2013;10:6123688157
Cites: Child Obes. 2013 Aug;9 Suppl:S22-3123944921
Cites: Child Obes. 2013 Aug;9 Suppl:S73-8623944926
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2013 Oct;98(4):1084-10223966427
Cites: Dev Psychol. 2014 Jan;50(1):229-3623668799
Cites: Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2014;11:1524512450
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2014 May;99(5):1096-10424572563
Cites: Fam Process. 1999 Winter;38(4):497-51010668625
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2000 Sep;3(3):345-5610979154
Cites: Nutr Rev. 2001 Mar;59(3 Pt 2):S21-39; discussion S57-6511330630
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 2001 Nov;158(11):1783-9311691682
Cites: Percept Mot Skills. 2002 Oct;95(2):621-3512434861
Cites: J Adolesc Health. 2003 May;32(5):365-7312729986
Cites: Health Educ Behav. 2003 Oct;30(5):615-2614582601
Cites: J Occup Health Psychol. 2004 Jan;9(1):83-9714700459
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2004 Apr;7(2):285-9315003136
Cites: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2004 May 20;124(10):1396-815195180
Cites: Biometrics. 1977 Mar;33(1):159-74843571
Cites: Stat Med. 1994 Dec 15-30;13(23-24):2465-767701147
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2004 Dec;7(8):991-815548337
Cites: Ann Nutr Metab. 2005 Jul-Aug;49(4):236-4516088087
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 2006 Apr;106(4):526-3216567147
Cites: J Fam Psychol. 2006 Jun;20(2):175-8916756393
Cites: Eat Behav. 2006 Nov;7(4):315-2217056407
Cites: Obesity (Silver Spring). 2007 Mar;15(3):719-3017372323
Cites: J Pediatr Psychol. 2007 Sep;32(8):960-7217535817
Cites: Percept Mot Skills. 2007 Jun;104(3 Pt 2):1169-8217879649
Cites: Nutr Rev. 2008 Mar;66(3):123-4018289177
Cites: Annu Rev Public Health. 2008;29:253-7218031223
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 2008 Jul;108(7):1231-518589035
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2009 Mar;12(3):307-1518498677
Cites: Int J Adolesc Med Health. 2009 Oct-Dec;21(4):457-8320306760
Cites: Obesity (Silver Spring). 2010 Apr;18(4):818-2519816417
PubMed ID
25316270 View in PubMed
Less detail

Fruit and vegetable intake in a sample of 11-year-old children in 9 European countries: The Pro Children Cross-sectional Survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29551
Source
Ann Nutr Metab. 2005 Jul-Aug;49(4):236-45
Publication Type
Article
Author
Agneta Yngve
Alexandra Wolf
Eric Poortvliet
Ibrahim Elmadfa
Johannes Brug
Bettina Ehrenblad
Bela Franchini
Jóhanna Haraldsdóttir
Rikke Krølner
Lea Maes
Carmen Pérez-Rodrigo
Michael Sjostrom
Inga Thórsdóttir
Knut-Inge Klepp
Author Affiliation
Department of Biosciences, Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. agneta.yngve@prevnut.ki.se
Source
Ann Nutr Metab. 2005 Jul-Aug;49(4):236-45
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Nutrition
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet Surveys
Europe
Female
Fruit
Humans
Male
Mental Recall
Nutrition Assessment
Nutrition Policy
Nutritional Requirements
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Schools
Sex Factors
Vegetables
Abstract
BACKGROUND/AIMS: An adequate fruit and vegetable intake provides essential nutrients and nutritive compounds and is considered an important part of a healthy lifestyle. No simple instrument has been available for the assessment of fruit and vegetable intake as well as its determinants in school-aged children applicable in different European countries. Within the Pro Children Project, such an instrument has been developed. This paper describes the cross-sectional survey in 11-year-olds in 9 countries. METHODS: The cross-sectional survey used nationally, and in 2 countries regionally, representative samples of schools and classes. The questionnaires, including a precoded 24-hour recall component and a food frequency part, were completed in the classroom. Data were treated using common syntax files for portion sizes and for merging of vegetable types into four subgroups. RESULTS: The results show that the fruit and vegetable intake in amounts and choice were highly diverse in the 9 participating countries. Vegetable intake was in general lower than fruit intake, boys consumed less fruit and vegetables than girls did. The highest total intake according to the 24-hour recall was found in Austria and Portugal, the lowest in Spain and Iceland. CONCLUSION: The fruit and vegetable intake in 11-year-old children was in all countries far from reaching population goals and food-based dietary guidelines on national and international levels.
PubMed ID
16088087 View in PubMed
Less detail

Fruit and vegetable intake of mothers of 11-year-old children in nine European countries: The Pro Children Cross-sectional Survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29550
Source
Ann Nutr Metab. 2005 Jul-Aug;49(4):246-54
Publication Type
Article
Author
Alexandra Wolf
Agneta Yngve
Ibrahim Elmadfa
Eric Poortvliet
Bettina Ehrenblad
Carmen Pérez-Rodrigo
Inga Thórsdóttir
Jóhanna Haraldsdóttir
Johannes Brug
Lea Maes
Maria Daniel Vaz de Almeida
Rikke Krølner
Knut-Inge Klepp
Author Affiliation
Institute for Nutritional Sciences, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
Source
Ann Nutr Metab. 2005 Jul-Aug;49(4):246-54
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet Surveys
Europe
Female
Food Habits
Fruit
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Humans
Mental Recall
Mothers
Nutrition Assessment
Nutrition Policy
Questionnaires
Vegetables
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To describe and compare fruit and vegetable intakes of mothers of 11-year-old children across Europe. METHODS: Cross-sectional surveys were carried out in 9 European countries in October/November 2003. Self-administered questionnaires assessing fruit and vegetable consumption were used for data collection. The current paper presents dietary intake data obtained by a precoded 24-hour recall and a food frequency questionnaire. RESULTS: The consumption levels of fruit and vegetables (without fruit juice) were in line with World Health Organization recommendations of > or =400 g/day for only 27% of all participating mothers. Based on both instruments, the Pro Children results showed comparatively high average fruit intake levels in Portugal, Denmark and Sweden (211, 203 and 194 g/day) and the lowest intake in Iceland (97 g/day). High vegetable intake levels were found in Portugal and Belgium (169 and 150 g/day), the lowest in Spain (88 g/day). A south-north gradient could not be observed in the Pro Children study. CONCLUSION: Fruit and vegetable intakes are low in mothers of 11-year-olds across Europe. Especially vegetable consumption can be regarded as marginal in most of the studied European countries. A high percentage of mothers indicated to eat fruit and vegetables less than once a day. The results have shown that national and international interventions are necessary to promote fruit and especially vegetable consumption in the European population of mothers.
PubMed ID
16088088 View in PubMed
Less detail

Individual and family environmental correlates of television and computer time in 10- to 12-year-old European children: the ENERGY-project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272494
Source
BMC Public Health. 2015;15:912
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Maïté Verloigne
Wendy Van Lippevelde
Elling Bere
Yannis Manios
Éva Kovács
Monika Grillenberger
Lea Maes
Johannes Brug
Ilse De Bourdeaudhuij
Source
BMC Public Health. 2015;15:912
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Belgium
Child
Computers
Cross-Sectional Studies
Environment
Family Relations
Female
Germany
Greece
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Hungary
Male
Norway
Parents
Social Environment
Surveys and Questionnaires
Television
Abstract
The aim was to investigate which individual and family environmental factors are related to television and computer time separately in 10- to-12-year-old children within and across five European countries (Belgium, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Norway).
Data were used from the ENERGY-project. Children and one of their parents completed a questionnaire, including questions on screen time behaviours and related individual and family environmental factors. Family environmental factors included social, political, economic and physical environmental factors. Complete data were obtained from 2022 child-parent dyads (53.8 % girls, mean child age 11.2 ± 0.8 years; mean parental age 40.5 ± 5.1 years). To examine the association between individual and family environmental factors (i.e. independent variables) and television/computer time (i.e. dependent variables) in each country, multilevel regression analyses were performed using MLwiN 2.22, adjusting for children's sex and age.
In all countries, children reported more television and/or computer time, if children and their parents thought that the maximum recommended level for watching television and/or using the computer was higher and if children had a higher preference for television watching and/or computer use and a lower self-efficacy to control television watching and/or computer use. Most physical and economic environmental variables were not significantly associated with television or computer time. Slightly more individual factors were related to children's computer time and more parental social environmental factors to children's television time. We also found different correlates across countries: parental co-participation in television watching was significantly positively associated with children's television time in all countries, except for Greece. A higher level of parental television and computer time was only associated with a higher level of children's television and computer time in Hungary. Having rules regarding children's television time was related to less television time in all countries, except for Belgium and Norway.
Most evidence was found for an association between screen time and individual and parental social environmental factors, which means that future interventions aiming to reduce screen time should focus on children's individual beliefs and habits as well parental social factors. As we identified some different correlates for television and computer time and across countries, cross-European interventions could make small adaptations per specific screen time activity and lay different emphases per country.
Notes
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2012 Oct;41(5):1460-7123045206
Cites: Acta Paediatr. 2012 Nov;101(11):1170-422849438
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2012;12:80522989231
Cites: J Adolesc Health. 2013 Jan;52(1):70-623260837
Cites: Obesity (Silver Spring). 2013 Mar;21(3):572-523592665
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2014;14:85725134740
Cites: Prev Med. 2015 Jan;70:96-10125482419
Cites: Ann Behav Med. 2009 Oct;38(2):147-5319809858
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2010 Mar-Apr;101(2):124-720524376
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2010;10:27620500859
Cites: Br J Sports Med. 2010 Aug;44(10):747-5518812418
Cites: Br J Sports Med. 2011 Sep;45(11):937-4221807671
Cites: Br J Sports Med. 2011 Sep;45(11):906-1321836174
Cites: Prev Med. 1999 Dec;29(6 Pt 1):563-7010600438
Cites: Int J Behav Med. 2004;11(3):152-6315496343
Cites: Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2008 Mar;18(3):242-5118083016
Cites: Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2011;8:9821936895
Cites: Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2011;8:13622152048
Cites: PLoS One. 2012;7(4):e3474222558098
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2012 Aug;15(8):1380-9522269173
Cites: BMC Res Notes. 2012;5:43422888983
PubMed ID
26384645 View in PubMed
Less detail

Television viewing behaviour and associations with food habits in different countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29137
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2006 Apr;9(2):244-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2006
Author
Carine A Vereecken
Joanna Todd
Chris Roberts
Caroline Mulvihill
Lea Maes
Author Affiliation
Child & Adolescent Health Research Unit, Moray House School of Education, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK.
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2006 Apr;9(2):244-50
Date
Apr-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Objective Several environmental factors influence adolescents' food habits and television (TV) viewing is thought to be one of these factors. The purpose of the present study was to describe sociodemographic differences in TV viewing and to examine associations of TV viewing with the consumption of sweets, soft drinks, fruit and vegetables in different countries.Methods Data were collected from 162 305 young people completing the 2001/02 Health Behaviour in School-Aged Children survey, a World Health Organization cross-national study on health and health behaviours among 11-, 13- and 15-year-old school pupils. Analyses of variance were used to examine sociodemographic differences in TV viewing and logistic regression analyses to examine associations between TV viewing and food habits.Results Large differences were found between countries in reported daily TV viewing time, from an average of 2.0 h in Switzerland to 3.7 h in Ukraine. The results indicate that those most likely to watch TV are boys, 13-year-olds and pupils of lower socio-economic status. Those who watched more TV were more likely to consume sweets and soft drinks on a daily basis and less likely to consume fruit and vegetables daily, although the latter associations were not so apparent among Central and Eastern European countries.Conclusions Given the high TV viewing rates among adolescents and the association with less healthy food options, many young people are at increased risk of overweight or obesity. Interventions to modify TV viewing behaviour are needed. The findings underscore the importance of tackling socio-economic differences.
PubMed ID
16571179 View in PubMed
Less detail

Validity and reproducibility of a precoded questionnaire to assess fruit and vegetable intake in European 11- to 12-year-old schoolchildren.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29552
Source
Ann Nutr Metab. 2005 Jul-Aug;49(4):221-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
Jóhanna Haraldsdóttir
Inga Thórsdóttir
Maria Daniel Vaz de Almeida
Lea Maes
Carmen Pérez Rodrigo
Ibrahim Elmadfa
Lene Frost Andersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Nutrition, Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Ann Nutr Metab. 2005 Jul-Aug;49(4):221-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Diet
Diet Records
Diet Surveys
Europe
Female
Fruit
Humans
Male
Mental Recall
Questionnaires - standards
Reproducibility of Results
Schools
Self Disclosure
Sensitivity and specificity
Vegetables
Abstract
BACKGROUND/AIMS: Validity and reproducibility were evaluated of a new questionnaire to assess fruit and vegetable intakes in 11- to 12-year-old children. METHODS: The precoded teacher-assisted self-administered questionnaire included two sections: a 24-hour recall part and a food frequency part. Validity was tested in 4 countries (Denmark, Iceland, Norway, Portugal; n = 43-60 per country) using a 1-day weighed food record and 7-day food records as reference methods. Test-retest (7-12 days apart) reproducibility was assessed in 6 countries (Belgium, Denmark, Iceland, Norway, Portugal, Spain; n = 60-74 per country). RESULTS: Spearman rank correlations for fruit and vegetable intake according to the frequency part and the 7-day food record ranged between r = 0.40-0.53. Between 25-50% were classified into the same quartile and 70-88% into the same or adjacent quartile. Test-retest Spearman rank correlations for the food frequency part were r = 0.47-0.84. Three countries showed no significant difference between fruit intake as assessed with the 24-hour recall part and the 1-day weighed food record, and 2 countries showed no significant difference for vegetables. In the other countries, the 24-hour recall part resulted in substantially higher mean intake levels. CONCLUSION: Validity and reproducibility as to ranking of subjects were regarded to be satisfactory in all countries. Group mean intake, based on the original 24-hour part, was valid for fruit in 3 countries and for vegetables in 2 countries, and this part was subsequently adjusted to avoid overestimation, before the questionnaire was used in the Pro Children study.
PubMed ID
16088085 View in PubMed
Less detail

What do parents think about parental participation in school-based interventions on energy balance-related behaviours? a qualitative study in 4 countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129407
Source
BMC Public Health. 2011;11:881
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Wendy Van Lippevelde
Maïté Verloigne
Ilse De Bourdeaudhuij
Mona Bjelland
Nanna Lien
Juan M Fernández-Alvira
Luis A Moreno
Eva Kovacs
Johannes Brug
Lea Maes
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Ghent University, Watersportlaan 2, 9000 Ghent, Belgium. wendy.vanlippevelde@ugent.be
Source
BMC Public Health. 2011;11:881
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Belgium
Energy intake
Female
Focus Groups
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Hungary
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Obesity - prevention & control
Overweight - prevention & control
Parents - psychology
Questionnaires
Schools
Spain
Abstract
Overweight and obesity in youth has increased dramatically. Therefore, overweight prevention initiatives should start early in life and target modifiable energy balance-related behaviours. Parental participation is often advocated as important for school-based interventions, however, getting parents involved in school-based interventions appears to be challenging based on earlier intervention experiences. The purpose of this study was to get insight into the determinants of and perspectives on parental participation in school-interventions on energy balance-related behaviours (physical activity, healthy eating, sedentary behaviours) in parents of ten- to twelve-year olds in order to develop an effective parental module for school-based interventions concerning energy balance-related behaviours.
Four countries (Belgium, Hungary, Norway and Spain) conducted the focus group research based on a standardised protocol and a semi-structured questioning route. A variation in parental socio-economic status (SES) and parental school involvement was taken into account when recruiting the parents. The audio taped interviews were transcribed, and a qualitative content analysis of the transcripts was conducted in each country.
Seventeen focus group interviews were conducted with a total of 92 parents (12 men, 80 women). Physical activity was considered to be a joint responsibility of school and parents, nutrition as parent's responsibility but supported by the school, and prevention of sedentary behaviours as parent's sole responsibility. Parents proposed interactive and practical activities together with their child as the best way to involve them such as cooking, food tasting, nutrition workshops, walking or cycling tours, sport initiations together with their child. Activities should be cheap, on a convenient moment, focused on their children and not on themselves, not tutoring, not theoretical, and school-or home-based.
Parents want to be involved in activities related to energy balance-related behaviours if this implies 'doing things together' with their child at school or at home.
Notes
Cites: J Hum Nutr Diet. 2005 Dec;18(6):431-4316351702
Cites: Health Promot Int. 2005 Mar;20(1):19-2615668217
Cites: Psychol Bull. 2006 Sep;132(5):667-9116910747
Cites: Obes Rev. 2007 Mar;8(2):129-5417300279
Cites: J Adv Nurs. 2008 Apr;62(1):107-1518352969
Cites: Int J Obes (Lond). 2008 Dec;32(12):1780-919079319
Cites: Int J Obes (Lond). 2009 Apr;33 Suppl 1:S74-8119363514
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2009 Aug;37(2):141-919589450
Cites: BMC Med. 2009;7:4919765270
Cites: Br J Nutr. 2010 Mar;103(6):781-9720070915
Cites: Health Educ Res. 2010 Apr;25(2):199-21018502732
Cites: Obes Rev. 2010 May;11(5):338-5319780989
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2010;10:27620500859
Cites: Prev Med. 2010 Aug;51(2):103-1120462509
Cites: Obes Rev. 2010 Dec;11(12):835-4620973911
Cites: Med Clin North Am. 2000 Mar;84(2):333-4610793645
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2000 May;32(5):963-7510795788
Cites: Br J Nutr. 1999 Apr;81 Suppl 2:S133-710999038
Cites: J Hum Nutr Diet. 2003 Apr;16(2):89-9612662367
Cites: Nutr Rev. 2004 Jan;62(1):39-5014995056
Cites: Obes Rev. 2004 May;5 Suppl 1:4-10415096099
Cites: Int J Behav Med. 2004;11(3):152-6315496343
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1988 Sep;78(9):1156-603407811
Cites: Can J Public Health. 1997 May-Jun;88(3):184-919303809
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 1998 Nov;15(4):298-3159838974
Cites: Future Child. 2006 Spring;16(1):109-4216532661
PubMed ID
22112159 View in PubMed
Less detail

8 records – page 1 of 1.