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Community-level factors that contribute to First Nations and Inuit older adults feeling supported to age well in a Canadian city.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298530
Source
J Aging Stud. 2019 Mar; 48:50-59
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-2019
Author
Lauren A Brooks-Cleator
Audrey R Giles
Martha Flaherty
Author Affiliation
School of Human Kinetics, University of Ottawa, 420B Montpetit Hall, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5, Canada. Electronic address: Lbroo049@uottawa.ca.
Source
J Aging Stud. 2019 Mar; 48:50-59
Date
Mar-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Despite the proliferation of age-friendly cities in Canada that are intended to support older adults to age well, there are still many inequalities between groups of older adults, particularly, and of concern for this paper, between Indigenous older adults, who experience colonialism's ongoing impacts, and non-Indigenous older adults. A better understanding of factors that inform these inequalities will help in the development of policies and programs that better support Indigenous older adults to age well and, thus, will contribute to ameliorating the inequalities that they face. Using a community-based participatory research approach, informed by a postcolonial theoretical lens, in this paper we addressed the question, "what community-level factors contribute to Indigenous older adults (aged 55 years and over) feeling supported to age well in the city of Ottawa?" We specifically examined this question in relation to the age-friendly communities framework, which guides the City of Ottawa's Older Adult Plan. Thematic analysis of semi-structured interviews, focus groups, and photovoice with 32 First Nations and Inuit older adults revealed that the participants felt both supported and unsupported to age well. More specifically, there were two main areas in which they felt they could be better supported to age well: the social environment and physical environment. There were three subthemes within the social environment theme: responsive health and community support services, respect and recognition, and communication and information. Within the physical environment theme there were four subthemes: transportation, housing, accessibility, and gathering space. The results demonstrate that despite there being similarities in the areas that the participants felt they needed support and the areas on which the Older Adult Plan focuses, if the domains of aging well initiatives do not better account for the impacts of colonialism, it is unlikely that they will be effective in supporting Indigenous older adults' health and well-being.
PubMed ID
30832930 View in PubMed
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Community-level factors that contribute to First Nations and Inuit older adults feeling supported to age well in a Canadian city.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300274
Source
J Aging Stud. 2019 Mar; 48:50-59
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-2019
Author
Lauren A Brooks-Cleator
Audrey R Giles
Martha Flaherty
Author Affiliation
School of Human Kinetics, University of Ottawa, 420B Montpetit Hall, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5, Canada. Electronic address: Lbroo049@uottawa.ca.
Source
J Aging Stud. 2019 Mar; 48:50-59
Date
Mar-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Cities
Female
Health Services for the Aged
Humans
Independent living
Interviews as Topic
Inuits
Male
Quebec
Social Environment
Social Support
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Despite the proliferation of age-friendly cities in Canada that are intended to support older adults to age well, there are still many inequalities between groups of older adults, particularly, and of concern for this paper, between Indigenous older adults, who experience colonialism's ongoing impacts, and non-Indigenous older adults. A better understanding of factors that inform these inequalities will help in the development of policies and programs that better support Indigenous older adults to age well and, thus, will contribute to ameliorating the inequalities that they face. Using a community-based participatory research approach, informed by a postcolonial theoretical lens, in this paper we addressed the question, "what community-level factors contribute to Indigenous older adults (aged 55 years and over) feeling supported to age well in the city of Ottawa?" We specifically examined this question in relation to the age-friendly communities framework, which guides the City of Ottawa's Older Adult Plan. Thematic analysis of semi-structured interviews, focus groups, and photovoice with 32 First Nations and Inuit older adults revealed that the participants felt both supported and unsupported to age well. More specifically, there were two main areas in which they felt they could be better supported to age well: the social environment and physical environment. There were three subthemes within the social environment theme: responsive health and community support services, respect and recognition, and communication and information. Within the physical environment theme there were four subthemes: transportation, housing, accessibility, and gathering space. The results demonstrate that despite there being similarities in the areas that the participants felt they needed support and the areas on which the Older Adult Plan focuses, if the domains of aging well initiatives do not better account for the impacts of colonialism, it is unlikely that they will be effective in supporting Indigenous older adults' health and well-being.
PubMed ID
30832930 View in PubMed
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Culturally Relevant Physical Activity through Elders in Motion: Physical Activity Programming for Older Aboriginal Adults in the Northwest Territories, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276464
Source
J Cross Cult Gerontol. 2016 Sep 28;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-28-2016
Author
Lauren A Brooks-Cleator
Audrey R Giles
Source
J Cross Cult Gerontol. 2016 Sep 28;
Date
Sep-28-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
The 2011 National Household Survey found that the number of Aboriginal peoples in Canada aged 65 and over has increased by over 46 % since the 2006 Canadian Census (Statistics Canada 2011). Despite this dramatic increase in older Aboriginal peoples, there is a dearth of research concerning this cohort, especially regarding their engagement with physical activity. Using a case study methodology, this research sought to examine if the Northwest Territories (NWT) Recreation and Parks Association's (NWTRPA) Elders in Motion (EIM) program is culturally relevant for the participants. For this research we used a postcolonial theoretical framework since many of the participants in EIM are Aboriginal older adults and have experienced, and continue to experience, the effects of colonialism. To address this aim we conducted nine semi-structured interviews with EIM program leaders and NWTRPA staff, and supplemented these with archival research of EIM program documents. The findings show that the NWTRPA has adapted many EIM program documents for the participants and thus attempts to be culturally relevant for the participants. There are, however, aspects of the program that are not culturally relevant and actually reinforce colonialism, specifically with the program content (i.e. activities that are a part of EIM). In light of these findings, recommendations are offered for the NWTRPA on how the EIM program can become more culturally relevant for its Aboriginal participants.
PubMed ID
27682893 View in PubMed
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"RIP KFC": Public Perceptions of a Fast-Food Restaurant Closure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300032
Source
Ecol Food Nutr. 2019 Mar-Apr; 58(2):120-141
Publication Type
Journal Article
Author
Meghan Lynch
Lauren A Brooks-Cleator
Audrey R Giles
M Hope Rumford
Author Affiliation
a Dalla Lana School of Public Health , University of Toronto , Toronto , ON , Canada.
Source
Ecol Food Nutr. 2019 Mar-Apr; 58(2):120-141
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Attitude
Canada
Commerce
Diet
Fast Foods
Food Preferences
Humans
Internet
Mass Media
Public Opinion
Restaurants
Social Media
Abstract
This paper used netnography and thematic analysis of the comments made in online news articles to understand better the public response to the closure of the only KFC restaurant in Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, Canada, in 2015. While the popular media often cover fast-food restaurant closures, past academic research has not examined the public response to these closures. To begin to fill this gap, we examined the comments sections of five online news articles from the Canadian news outlet, CBC.ca, and reactions shared on Facebook. 239 commenters made 308 publicly available online comments addressing the closure. Key themes in commenter perceptions included pro-closure reactions, which were based on the perceived public health benefits of reduced fast-food consumption, and anti-closure reactions to such factors as the loss of a local landmark and a source of positive memories. The unfavorable reactions appeared to pose a significant barrier to public acceptance of the KFC closure. This paper argues that it is important to examine public perceptions of fast-food closures to understand better what these restaurants mean to individuals and communities. This information, in turn, can be used to promote healthier restaurant-eating in ways that will complement efforts to encourage healthier food choices.
PubMed ID
30688089 View in PubMed
Less detail

"RIP KFC": Public Perceptions of a Fast-Food Restaurant Closure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297800
Source
Ecol Food Nutr. 2019 Mar-Apr; 58(2):120-141
Publication Type
Journal Article
Author
Meghan Lynch
Lauren A Brooks-Cleator
Audrey R Giles
M Hope Rumford
Author Affiliation
a Dalla Lana School of Public Health , University of Toronto , Toronto , ON , Canada.
Source
Ecol Food Nutr. 2019 Mar-Apr; 58(2):120-141
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
This paper used netnography and thematic analysis of the comments made in online news articles to understand better the public response to the closure of the only KFC restaurant in Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, Canada, in 2015. While the popular media often cover fast-food restaurant closures, past academic research has not examined the public response to these closures. To begin to fill this gap, we examined the comments sections of five online news articles from the Canadian news outlet, CBC.ca, and reactions shared on Facebook. 239 commenters made 308 publicly available online comments addressing the closure. Key themes in commenter perceptions included pro-closure reactions, which were based on the perceived public health benefits of reduced fast-food consumption, and anti-closure reactions to such factors as the loss of a local landmark and a source of positive memories. The unfavorable reactions appeared to pose a significant barrier to public acceptance of the KFC closure. This paper argues that it is important to examine public perceptions of fast-food closures to understand better what these restaurants mean to individuals and communities. This information, in turn, can be used to promote healthier restaurant-eating in ways that will complement efforts to encourage healthier food choices.
PubMed ID
30688089 View in PubMed
Less detail