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Alcoholic beverage consumption and gastric cancer risk: a prospective population-based study in women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80058
Source
Int J Cancer. 2007 Jan 15;120(2):373-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-15-2007
Author
Larsson Susanna C
Giovannucci Edward
Wolk Alicja
Author Affiliation
Division of Nutritional Epidemiology, National Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. susanna.larsson@ki.se
Source
Int J Cancer. 2007 Jan 15;120(2):373-7
Date
Jan-15-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Registries
Risk
Stomach Neoplasms - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The association between alcohol consumption and risk of gastric cancer remains controversial. Moreover, prospective data on the role of alcoholic beverage type are sparse. We prospectively investigated the association between total alcohol (ethanol) intake as well as specific alcoholic beverages and risk of gastric cancer in the Swedish Mammography Cohort, a population-based cohort of 61,433 women. Alcohol intake and other dietary exposures were assessed at baseline (1987-1990) and again in 1997 using a food-frequency questionnaire. Incident gastric cancer cases were ascertained through the Swedish Cancer Register. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). During 966,807 person-years of follow-up, through June 2005, 160 incident cases of gastric cancer occurred. Total alcohol intake was not significantly associated with risk of gastric cancer. Compared with nondrinkers, the multivariate HR of gastric cancer for women with an alcohol intake of 40 g or more per week was 1.33 (95% CI, 0.79-2.25). Consumption of medium-strong/strong beer was associated with a statistically significant increased risk of gastric cancer; the multivariate HR for women who consumed more than one serving of medium-strong/strong beer per week (median, 2.5 drinks/week) was 2.09 (95% CI, 1.11-3.93; p-trend = 0.02) compared with no consumption. Consumption of light beer, wine, and hard liquor was not significantly associated with gastric cancer risk. Our findings suggest that constituents of beer other than alcohol may be associated with an increased risk of gastric cancer.
PubMed ID
17066442 View in PubMed
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Aspirin and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use and risk of pancreatic cancer: a meta-analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79433
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2006 Dec;15(12):2561-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2006
Author
Larsson Susanna C
Giovannucci Edward
Bergkvist Leif
Wolk Alicja
Author Affiliation
Division of Nutritional Epidemiology, The National Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, P.O. Box 210, SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden. susanna.larsson@ki.se
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2006 Dec;15(12):2561-4
Date
Dec-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal - therapeutic use
Aspirin - therapeutic use
Female
Humans
Male
Pancreatic Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Risk
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The association between use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID), including aspirin, and risk of pancreatic cancer is controversial. We did a meta-analysis to summarize available evidence from epidemiologic studies investigating the relation between use of aspirin or other NSAIDs and the risk of pancreatic cancer. METHODS: We identified potential studies by searching the MEDLINE database (from 1966 to October 2006) and by reviewing the reference lists of pertinent publications. Studies were eligible for inclusion if they met the following criteria: (a) had a case-control or prospective design, (b) examined exposure to aspirin or NSAIDs, (c) the outcome was pancreatic cancer incidence or mortality, and (d) they provided a relative risk (RR) estimate with corresponding confidence interval or sufficient information to permit their calculation. Study-specific RR estimates were pooled using a random effects model. RESULTS: A total of 11 studies (3 case-control studies, 7 cohort studies, and 1 randomized trial), involving 6,386 pancreatic cancer cases, was included in the meta-analysis. The summary RR estimate did not indicate any association between aspirin/NSAID use and risk of pancreatic cancer [any/regular use versus nonregular/never use: RR, 1.01; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 0.91-1.11; P(heterogeneity) = 0.09]. Neither use of aspirin, nonaspirin NSAIDs, nor overall NSAIDs were associated with pancreatic cancer risk. There was also no overall association with frequent (six or more tablets/times per week versus none: RR, 0.86; 95% CI, 0.61-1.23) or long-term (>or=20 years) use of aspirin (RR, 1.21; 95% CI, 0.74-1.96). CONCLUSIONS: Current epidemiologic evidence does not indicate that use of aspirin or NSAIDs is associated with the risk of pancreatic cancer.
PubMed ID
17164387 View in PubMed
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Carbohydrate intake, glycemic index and glycemic load in relation to risk of endometrial cancer: A prospective study of Swedish women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79636
Source
Int J Cancer. 2007 Mar 1;120(5):1103-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1-2007
Author
Larsson Susanna C
Friberg Emilie
Wolk Alicja
Author Affiliation
Division of Nutritional Epidemiology, The National Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. susanna.larsson@ki.se
Source
Int J Cancer. 2007 Mar 1;120(5):1103-7
Date
Mar-1-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - epidemiology
Body mass index
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Endometrial Neoplasms - epidemiology
Female
Glycemic Index
Humans
Incidence
Middle Aged
Obesity - diagnosis
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The associations of carbohydrate intake, glycemic index and glycemic load with endometrial cancer risk were examined among 61,226 participants of the Swedish Mammography Cohort who were cancer-free at enrollment between 1987 and 1990 and completed a food frequency questionnaire. During a mean follow-up of 15.6 years, through June 2005, 608 incident cases of endometrial adenocarcinoma were diagnosed. We observed no overall association between carbohydrate intake, glycemic index or glycemic load and incidence of endometrial cancer; the rate ratios (RRs) for the highest versus the lowest quintile were 1.12 (95% CI, 0.85-1.47) for carbohydrate intake, 1.00 (95% CI, 0.77-1.30) for glycemic index and 1.15 (95% CI, 0.88-1.51) for glycemic load. However, among obese women (body mass index, BMI > or =30 kg/m2), endometrial cancer incidence was nonsignificantly elevated in the top versus bottom quintiles of carbohydrate intake (RR, 1.68; 95% CI, 0.86-3.29) and glycemic load (RR, 1.57; 95% CI, 0.82-2.99). In a subanalysis of women who completed a follow-up questionnaire in 1997, which collected information on physical activity, carbohydrate intake and glycemic load were positively related to endometrial cancer risk among overweight women (BMI > or =25 kg/m2) with low physical activity. In this subgroup, the multivariate RRs comparing extreme quartiles were 1.90 (95% CI, 0.84-4.31) for carbohydrate intake and 2.99 (95% CI, 1.17-7.67) for glycemic load. Results from this cohort study suggest that a high carbohydrate intake and a high glycemic load may increase the risk of endometrial cancer among overweight women with low physical activity.
PubMed ID
17131331 View in PubMed
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Coffee consumption and stomach cancer risk in a cohort of Swedish women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81442
Source
Int J Cancer. 2006 Nov 1;119(9):2186-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1-2006
Author
Larsson Susanna C
Giovannucci Edward
Wolk Alicja
Author Affiliation
Division of Nutritional Epidemiology, The National Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. susanna.larsson@ki.se
Source
Int J Cancer. 2006 Nov 1;119(9):2186-9
Date
Nov-1-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking
Coffee - toxicity
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Smoking
Stomach Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Few prospective studies have examined the relationship between coffee consumption and risk of stomach cancer, and the findings have been inconsistent. We prospectively investigated the association of long-term coffee consumption with risk of stomach cancer in a population-based cohort study of 61,433 Swedish women. Information on coffee consumption was collected with a food-frequency questionnaire at baseline (1987-1990) and updated in 1997. During a mean follow-up of 15.7 years from 1987 through June 2005, 160 incident cases of stomach cancer were diagnosed. Coffee consumption was positively associated with the risk of stomach cancer. Compared to women who consumed 1 or fewer cups of coffee per day, the multivariate hazard ratios were 1.49 (95% = 0.97-2.27) for women who drank 2-3 cups per day and 1.86 (95% CI = 1.07-3.25) for those who drank 4 or more cups per day (p for trend = 0.01). An increase of 1 cup of coffee per day was associated with a statistically significant 22% increased risk of stomach cancer (hazard ratio = 1.22; 95% CI = 1.05-1.42). These prospective data suggest that coffee consumption may increase the risk of stomach cancer in a dose-response manner. This finding needs to be confirmed in other prospective studies.
PubMed ID
16841331 View in PubMed
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Consumption of sugar and sugar-sweetened foods and the risk of pancreatic cancer in a prospective study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79900
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2006 Nov;84(5):1171-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2006
Author
Larsson Susanna C
Bergkvist Leif
Wolk Alicja
Author Affiliation
Division of Nutritional Epidemiology, National Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. susanna.larsson@ki.se
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2006 Nov;84(5):1171-6
Date
Nov-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Carbonated Beverages
Cohort Studies
Diet
Dietary Sucrose - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Female
Fruit
Humans
Hyperglycemia - complications
Hyperinsulinism - complications
Male
Middle Aged
Pancreatic Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Emerging evidence indicates that hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia may be implicated in the development of pancreatic cancer. Frequent consumption of sugar and high-sugar foods may increase the risk of pancreatic cancer by inducing frequent postprandial hyperglycemia, increasing insulin demand, and decreasing insulin sensitivity. OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to examine prospectively the association of the consumption of added sugar (ie, sugar added to coffee, tea, cereals, etc) and of high-sugar foods with the risk of pancreatic cancer in a population-based cohort study of Swedish women and men. DESIGN: A food-frequency questionnaire was completed in 1997 by 77 797 women and men aged 45-83 y who had no previous diagnosis of cancer or history of diabetes. The participants were followed through June 2005. RESULTS: During a mean follow-up of 7.2 y, we identified 131 incident cases of pancreatic cancer. The consumption of added sugar, soft drinks, and sweetened fruit soups or stewed fruit was positively associated with the risk of pancreatic cancer. The multivariate hazard ratios for the highest compared with the lowest consumption categories were 1.69 (95% CI: 0.99, 2.89; P for trend = 0.06) for sugar, 1.93 (1.18, 3.14; P for trend = 0.02) for soft drinks, and 1.51 (0.97, 2.36; P for trend = 0.05) for sweetened fruit soups or stewed fruit. CONCLUSION: High consumption of sugar and high-sugar foods may be associated with a greater risk of pancreatic cancer.
PubMed ID
17093171 View in PubMed
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Cultured milk, yogurt, and dairy intake in relation to bladder cancer risk in a prospective study of Swedish women and men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91719
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2008 Oct;88(4):1083-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2008
Author
Larsson Susanna C
Andersson Swen-Olof
Johansson Jan-Erik
Wolk Alicja
Author Affiliation
Division of Nutritional Epidemiology, National Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. susanna.larsson@ki.se
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2008 Oct;88(4):1083-7
Date
Oct-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cohort Studies
Cultured Milk Products
Dairy Products
Diet
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Registries
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Urinary Bladder Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Findings from epidemiologic studies of the effect of dairy foods (mainly milk) on the risk of bladder cancer have been inconsistent. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to examine the association between the intake of cultured milk and other dairy foods and the incidence of bladder cancer in a prospective, population-based cohort. DESIGN: We prospectively followed 82,002 Swedish women and men who were cancer-free and who completed a 96-item food-frequency questionnaire in 1997. Incident cases of bladder cancer were identified in the Swedish cancer registries. RESULTS: During a mean follow-up of 9.4 y, 485 participants (76 women and 409 men) were diagnosed with bladder cancer. Total dairy intake was not significantly associated with risk of bladder cancer [> or =7.0 servings/d compared with or =2 servings/d) compared with the lowest category (0 serving/d) were 0.62 (95% CI: 0.46, 0.85; P for trend = 0.006) in women and men combined, 0.55 (95% CI: 0.25, 1.22; P for trend = 0.06) in women, and 0.64 (95% CI: 0.46, 0.89; P for trend = 0.03) in men. The intake of milk or cheese was not associated with bladder cancer risk. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that a high intake of cultured milk may lower the risk of developing bladder cancer.
PubMed ID
18842797 View in PubMed
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Diabetes mellitus, body size and bladder cancer risk in a prospective study of Swedish men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92475
Source
Eur J Cancer. 2008 Nov;44(17):2655-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2008
Author
Larsson Susanna C
Andersson Swen-Olof
Johansson Jan-Erik
Wolk Alicja
Author Affiliation
Division of Nutritional Epidemiology, The National Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. susanna.larsson@ki.se
Source
Eur J Cancer. 2008 Nov;44(17):2655-60
Date
Nov-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Body mass index
Body Size - physiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - complications - epidemiology
Epidemiologic Methods
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Urinary Bladder Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
Epidemiologic studies on diabetes and body size in relation to risk of bladder cancer have yielded inconsistent results. We examined prospectively the associations between a history of diabetes, height, weight, body mass index and waist circumference, and the incidence of bladder cancer in the Cohort of Swedish Men, a prospective study of 45,906 men aged 45-79 years at baseline. During follow-up from 1998 through December 2007, 414 incident cases of bladder cancer were ascertained. A history of diabetes was not associated with risk of bladder cancer (multivariate rate ratio=1.16; 95% confidence interval=0.81-1.64). Similarly, no associations were observed for height, weight, body mass index or waist circumference. These findings in men do not support a role for diabetes, height or excess body mass in the aetiology of bladder cancer.
PubMed ID
18707871 View in PubMed
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Dietary acrylamide intake and risk of colorectal cancer in a prospective cohort of men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90565
Source
Eur J Cancer. 2009 Mar;45(4):513-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009
Author
Larsson Susanna C
Akesson Agneta
Bergkvist Leif
Wolk Alicja
Author Affiliation
Division of Nutritional Epidemiology, The National Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, PO Box 210, SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden. susanna.larsson@ki.se
Source
Eur J Cancer. 2009 Mar;45(4):513-6
Date
Mar-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acrylamide - administration & dosage - adverse effects - analysis
Adenocarcinoma - chemically induced - epidemiology - pathology
Carcinogens - administration & dosage - analysis
Colorectal Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology - pathology
Diet
Epidemiologic Methods
Food contamination - analysis
Food Habits
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Acrylamide is a probable human carcinogen that causes cancer at multiple sites in animal models. However, whether dietary acrylamide intake increases the risk of colorectal cancer in humans is unclear. We examined the association between dietary acrylamide intake and colorectal cancer incidence in the Cohort of Swedish Men, a population-based prospective cohort of 45,306 men who completed a food-frequency questionnaire at enrolment in 1997. During a mean follow-up of 9.3 years, we ascertained 676 incident colorectal cancer cases. Compared with the lowest quartile of acrylamide intake ( or =41.7 microg/d) were 0.95 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.74-1.20) for colorectal cancer, 0.97 (95% CI 0.71-1.31) for colon cancer and 0.91 (95% CI 0.62-1.34) for rectal cancer. In conclusion, this study provides no evidence that dietary acrylamide in amounts typically consumed by Swedish men is associated with risk of colorectal cancer.
PubMed ID
19121931 View in PubMed
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Dietary carbohydrate, glycemic index, and glycemic load in relation to risk of colorectal cancer in women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79714
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2007 Feb 1;165(3):256-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1-2007
Author
Larsson Susanna C
Giovannucci Edward
Wolk Alicja
Author Affiliation
Division of Nutritional Epidemiology, National Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. susanna.larsson@ki.se
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2007 Feb 1;165(3):256-61
Date
Feb-1-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - epidemiology
Adult
Aged
Colorectal Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Female
Glycemic Index
Humans
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Diets with a high glycemic index and glycemic load have been hypothesized to be implicated in the etiology of colorectal cancer owing to their potential to increase postprandial glucose and insulin levels. Prospective data on glycemic index and glycemic load in relation to colorectal cancer risk are limited and inconsistent. Therefore, the authors prospectively investigated the associations of dietary carbohydrate, glycemic index, and glycemic load with the incidence of colorectal cancer among 61,433 Swedish women who were free of cancer in 1987-1990 and completed a 67-item food frequency questionnaire. During follow-up through June 2005, 870 incident cases of colorectal adenocarcinoma were diagnosed. Carbohydrate intake, glycemic index, and glycemic load were not associated with risk of colorectal cancer, colon cancer, or rectal cancer. The multivariate hazard ratios for colorectal cancer comparing the highest with the lowest quintile were 1.10 (95% confidence interval: 0.85, 1.44) for carbohydrate intake, 1.00 (95% confidence interval: 0.75, 1.33) for glycemic index, and 1.06 (95% confidence interval: 0.81, 1.39) for glycemic load. Results did not vary by body mass index. The findings from this prospective study do not support the hypothesis that a high carbohydrate intake, a high glycemic index, and a high glycemic load increase the risk of colorectal cancer.
PubMed ID
17118965 View in PubMed
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Folate intake and risk of breast cancer by estrogen and progesterone receptor status in a Swedish cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90911
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2008 Dec;17(12):3444-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Larsson Susanna C
Bergkvist Leif
Wolk Alicja
Author Affiliation
Division of Nutritional Epidemiology, National Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Box 210, SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden. susanna.larsson@ki.se
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2008 Dec;17(12):3444-9
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - radiography
Female
Folic Acid - administration & dosage
Humans
Incidence
Mammography
Proportional Hazards Models
Questionnaires
Receptors, Estrogen - metabolism
Receptors, Progesterone - metabolism
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Folate is a B vitamin involved in one-carbon metabolism and has been postulated to influence the risk of breast cancer. However, epidemiologic studies of folate intake in relation to breast cancer risk are inconclusive. We examined the association between dietary folate intake and the risk of breast cancer by estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) status of the breast tumor in the Swedish Mammography Cohort. METHODS: Our study population consisted of 61,433 women who completed a food frequency questionnaire at baseline (1987-1990) and again in 1997. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate rate ratios (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). RESULTS: During an average of 17.4 years of follow-up, 2,952 incident cases of invasive breast cancer were ascertained. We observed no association between dietary folate intake and risk of total breast cancer or ER+/PR+ or ER-/PR- tumors. The multivariate RR of total breast cancer comparing extreme quintiles of folate intake was 1.01 (95% CI, 0.90-1.13; P(trend) = 0.84). However, folate intake was inversely associated with risk of ER+/PR- breast cancer (n = 417 cases; RR for highest versus lowest quintile, 0.79; 95% CI, 0.59-1.07; P(trend) = 0.01). Results did not vary by alcohol intake or menopausal status. CONCLUSIONS: These findings do not support an overall association between folate intake and risk of breast cancer but suggest that folate intake may be inversely associated with ER+/PR- tumors.
PubMed ID
19064560 View in PubMed
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25 records – page 1 of 3.