Skip header and navigation

3 records – page 1 of 1.

Antioxidant intake, oxidative stress and inflammation among immigrant women from the Middle East living in Sweden: associations with cardiovascular risk factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature84865
Source
Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2007 Dec;17(10):748-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2007
Author
Daryani Achraf
Basu Samar
Becker Wulf
Larsson Anders
Risérus Ulf
Author Affiliation
Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala Science Park, 751 85 Uppsala, Sweden. achraf.daryani@pubcare.uu.se
Source
Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2007 Dec;17(10):748-56
Date
Dec-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antioxidants - administration & dosage
Blood Pressure - physiology
C-Reactive Protein - analysis
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood - epidemiology - etiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet
Emigration and Immigration
F2-Isoprostanes - blood
Female
Food Habits - ethnology
Humans
Inflammation - blood - epidemiology
Iran - ethnology
Middle Aged
Oxidative Stress
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Turkey - ethnology
Abstract
BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Immigrant women from the Middle East have higher cardiovascular risk compared to native women. Whether low antioxidant intake, oxidative stress or inflammation contributes to risk is unknown. In a cross-sectional study of 157 randomly selected foreign-born women (Iranian and Turkish) and native women living in Sweden, we investigated antioxidant status, oxidative stress (F(2)-isoprostanes) and systemic inflammation (plasma high sensitive C-reactive protein; CRP) markers. We also investigated relationships between F(2)-isoprostanes, CRP and cardiovascular risk factors. METHODS AND RESULT: Dietary intake was assessed using 24-h dietary recalls repeated four times. Micronutrient intake was not consistently different between groups. Serum alpha-tocopherol, but not gamma-tocopherol levels, was lower in Turkish vs. Swedish women (P0.21, P values
PubMed ID
17145175 View in PubMed
Less detail

Low-grade albuminuria and the incidence of heart failure in a community-based cohort of elderly men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87557
Source
Eur Heart J. 2007 Jul;28(14):1739-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2007
Author
Ingelsson Erik
Sundström Johan
Lind Lars
Risérus Ulf
Larsson Anders
Basu Samar
Arnlöv Johan
Author Affiliation
Section of Geriatrics, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala Science Park, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Eur Heart J. 2007 Jul;28(14):1739-45
Date
Jul-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Albuminuria - complications
Biological Markers - urine
Cohort Studies
Heart Failure - etiology - mortality
Humans
Kidney Failure
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Predictive value of tests
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Survival Analysis
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
AIMS: To investigate associations of urinary albumin excretion rate (UAER) and heart failure (HF) incidence in a community-based sample. METHODS AND RESULTS: In a prospective study of 70-year-old men free from HF at baseline (n = 1106), UAER (from timed overnight samples) was analysed with established risk factors for HF [acute MI before baseline, acute MI during follow-up (modelled as a time-dependent covariate), hypertension, diabetes, left ventricular hypertrophy, smoking, body mass index, and glomerular filtration rate] and more recently described risk factors [high-sensitive C-reactive protein and insulin sensitivity (clamp glucose disposal rate)] as predictors of HF incidence. Ninety-eight participants developed HF during a median follow-up of 9.0 years. In Cox proportional hazards models adjusted for established and novel risk factors for HF, a 1 SD increase in log UAER increased the risk of HF in individuals without anti-hypertensive treatment (hazard ratio 1.49; 95% CI 1.13-1.98; P = 0.005). Furthermore, UAER remained an independent predictor of HF, also in participants without diabetes at baseline or myocardial infarction at baseline or during follow-up. There were no significant associations between UAER and HF incidence in individuals with anti-hypertensive treatment. CONCLUSION: Our observations support the notion that low-grade albuminuria is a marker for subclinical cardiovascular damage that predisposes to future HF in the community.
Notes
Comment In: Eur Heart J. 2007 Nov;28(21):2689-90; author reply 269017827200
PubMed ID
17495987 View in PubMed
Less detail

Patient selection has a strong impact on cystatin C and Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) estimated glomerular filtration rate.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92665
Source
Clin Biochem. 2008 Nov;41(16-17):1355-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2008
Author
Larsson Anders
Flodin Mats
Hansson Lars-Olof
Carlsson Lena
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Chemistry and Pharmacology, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden. anders.larsson@akademiska.se
Source
Clin Biochem. 2008 Nov;41(16-17):1355-61
Date
Nov-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bias (epidemiology)
Creatinine - blood
Cystatins - blood
Diet
Female
Glomerular Filtration Rate - physiology
Humans
Intensive Care Units
Kidney Diseases - blood - epidemiology - physiopathology
Kidney Failure, Chronic - blood - epidemiology - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Selection
Patients' Rooms
Primary Health Care
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Estimation of the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is essential for the evaluation of patients with kidney disease, and for correct dosage of drugs that are eliminated from the circulation by the kidneys. In most cases GFR is estimated based on serum creatinine and the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) formula. As both cystatin C and creatinine are used for the determination of GFR it is important to investigate if estimated GFR by the two methods differ in various patient groups. DESIGN AND METHODS: We have compared cystatin C and MDRD estimated GFR calculated from the same request from primary care units (n=488), a cardiology ward (n=826), the cardiointensive care unit (n=1026), two oncology wards (n=919 and 1021), and the neurosurgical intensive care unit (n=1515) in an observational cross-sectional study. RESULTS: We found better agreement between the two GFR estimates in samples from primary care patients and patients in the cardiology wards, than in samples from oncology wards or the neurosurgical intensive care unit. In the latter settings there was a pronounced difference between the two GFR estimates. CONCLUSION: The comparisons show that differences in patient selections have a strong impact on the agreement between cystatin C and MDRD estimated glomerular filtration rate.
PubMed ID
18674527 View in PubMed
Less detail