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Are high school students living in lodgings at an increased risk for internalizing problems?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98963
Source
J Adolesc. 2010 Jun;33(3):439-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2010
Author
Wenche Wannebo
Lars Wichstrøm
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Health Sciences, Nord-Trøndelag University College, Steinkjer, Norway. wenche.wannebo@hint.no
Source
J Adolesc. 2010 Jun;33(3):439-47
Date
Jun-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Behavioral Symptoms - diagnosis - psychology
Depression - diagnosis - psychology
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Independent Living - psychology
Internal-External Control
Loneliness - psychology
Male
Norway
Object Attachment
Personality Inventory - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics
Sex Factors
Social Environment
Students - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
This study aimed to investigate whether leaving home to live in lodgings during senior high school can be a risk factor for the development of internalizing problems. Utilizing two large-scale prospective community studies of 2399 and 3906 Norwegian students (age range 15-19 years), respectively, the difference in internalizing symptoms between adolescents living in lodgings and adolescents living with their parents during senior high school was examined. Female students living in lodgings had higher scores on internalizing problems than female students living at home, whereas no differences were found for males. Living in lodgings did not predict later internalizing problems, and prior internalizing problems did not predict moving into lodgings. It is therefore suggested that the negative effect of living in lodgings on high school students' well-being is temporary.
PubMed ID
19631976 View in PubMed
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Association Between Objectively Measured Sleep Duration and Symptoms of Psychiatric Disorders in Middle Childhood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature307511
Source
JAMA Netw Open. 2019 12 02; 2(12):e1918281
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
12-02-2019
Author
Bror M Ranum
Lars Wichstrøm
Ståle Pallesen
Jonas Falch-Madsen
Marte Halse
Silje Steinsbekk
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway.
Source
JAMA Netw Open. 2019 12 02; 2(12):e1918281
Date
12-02-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Anxiety Disorders - epidemiology
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - epidemiology
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - epidemiology
Child Welfare - statistics & numerical data
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Norway
Prospective Studies
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders - epidemiology
Somnambulism - epidemiology
Abstract
The long-term association between sleep duration and mental health in children is currently unknown.
To investigate the prospective associations between sleep duration and symptoms of emotional and behavioral disorders at ages 6, 8, 10, and 12 years.
This population-based cohort study obtained data from the Trondheim Early Secure Study in Trondheim, Norway. A representative, stratified random sample of children born between January 1, 2003, and December 31, 2004, were invited to participate. Participants were followed up biennially from age 4 years (2007-2008) to 12 years (2013-2014). Data analysis was conducted from January 2, 2019, to May 28, 2019.
Sleep duration was assessed with 1 week of continuous use of a triaxial accelerometer. Symptoms of emotional (anxiety and depression) and behavioral (oppositional defiant, conduct, and attention-deficit/hyperactivity) disorders were measured by semistructured clinical interviews (using the Preschool Age Psychiatric Assessment and the Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Assessment) with parents (at all ages) and children (from age 8 years).
The analytical sample comprised 799 children (mean [SD] age at time point 2, 6.0 [0.2] years; 405 [50.7%] boys; and 771 [96.5%] Norwegian). Shorter sleep duration at age 6 years (ß [unstandardized regression coefficient]?=?-0.44; 95% CI, -0.80 to -0.08; P?=?.02) and 8 years (ß?=?-0.47; 95% CI, -0.83 to -0.11; P?=?.01) forecasted symptoms of emotional disorders 2 years later. Comparatively short sleep duration at age 8 years (ß?=?-0.65; 95% CI,?-1.22 to -0.08; P?=?.03) and 10 years (ß?=?-0.58; 95% CI,?-1.07 to -0.08; P?=?.02) was associated with symptoms of behavioral disorders 2 years later among boys but not among girls at age 8 years (ß =?-0.14; 95% CI,-?0.52 to 0.24; P?=?.48) or 10 years (ß?=?-0.05; 95% CI,?=?-0.49 to 0.40; P?=?.84). These associations were statistically significant among boys compared with girls at age 8 years (??21?=?13.26; P?
PubMed ID
31880797 View in PubMed
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Body composition impacts appetite regulation in middle childhood. A prospective study of Norwegian community children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287229
Source
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2017 05 30;14(1):70
Publication Type
Article
Date
05-30-2017
Author
Silje Steinsbekk
Clare H Llewellyn
Alison Fildes
Lars Wichstrøm
Source
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2017 05 30;14(1):70
Date
05-30-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Appetite - physiology
Appetite Regulation - physiology
Body Composition - physiology
Child
Eating
Feeding Behavior - physiology
Female
Food
Humans
Male
Norway
Prospective Studies
Satiation
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Research suggests a role for both fat mass and muscle mass in appetite regulation, but the longitudinal relationships between them have not yet been examined in children. The present study therefore aimed to explore the prospective relationships between fat mass, muscle mass and the appetitive traits food responsiveness and satiety responsiveness in middle childhood.
Food responsiveness and satiety responsiveness were measured using the parent-reported Children's Eating Behavior Questionnaire in a representative sample of Norwegian 6?year olds, followed up at 8 and 10?years of age (n?=?807). Body composition was measured by bioelectrical impedance.
Applying a structural equation modeling framework we found that higher fat mass predicted greater increases in food responsiveness over time, whereas greater muscle mass predicted decreases in satiety responsiveness. This pattern was consistent both from ages 6 to 8 and from ages 8 to 10?years.
Our study is the first to reveal that fat mass and muscle mass predict distinct changes in different appetitive traits over time. Replication of findings in non-European populations are needed, as are studies of children in other age groups. Future studies should also aim to reveal the underlying mechanisms.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28558723 View in PubMed
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Changes in quality of life among Norwegian school children: a six-month follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152781
Source
Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2009;7:7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Thomas Jozefiak
Bo Larsson
Lars Wichstrøm
Author Affiliation
The Norwegian University of Technology and Science (NTNU), Regional Centre of Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Trondheim, Norway. thomas.jozefiak@ntnu.no
Source
Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2009;7:7
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Child
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Norway
Psychometrics
Quality of Life
Schools
Sex Factors
Abstract
A considerable gap exists in regard to longitudinal research on quality of life (QoL) in community populations of children and adolescents. Changes and stability of QoL have been poorly examined, despite the fact that children and adolescents undergo profound developmental changes. The aims of the study were to investigate short-term changes in student QoL with regard to sex and age in a school-based sample.
A representative Norwegian sample of 1,821 school children, aged 8-16 years and their parents were tested at baseline and 6 months later, using the Inventory of Life Quality for Children and Adolescents (ILC) and the Kinder Lebensqualität Fragebogen (KINDL). Student response rate at baseline was 71.2% and attrition over the follow-up period was 4.6%, and 1,336 parents (70%) completed the follow-up. Change scores between baseline and follow-up evaluations were analysed by means of ANCOVA in regard to sex and age effects.
Students in the 8th grade reported a decrease in QoL over the six-month follow-up period as compared to those in the 6th grade with regard to Family and School domains and total QoL on the KINDL. For emotional well-being a significant linear decrease in QoL across grades 6th to 10th was observed. However, student ratings on the Friends and Self-esteem domains did not change significantly by age. Girls reported a higher decrease in their QoL across all grades over the follow-up period than did boys in respect of Self-esteem on the KINDL, and an age-related decrease in total QoL between 6th and 8th grade on the ILC. Parent reports of changes in child QoL were nonsignificant on most of the domains.
The observed age and sex-related changes in school children's QoL across the six-month follow-up period should be considered in epidemiological as well as clinical research.
Notes
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PubMed ID
19193211 View in PubMed
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Changes in referrals to child and adolescent psychiatric services in Norway 1992--2001.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29942
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2004 Oct;39(10):818-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2004
Author
Bjørn Reigstad
Kirsti Jørgensen
Lars Wichstrøm
Author Affiliation
Dept of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, 8000 Bodø, Norway. bre@nlsh.no
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2004 Oct;39(10):818-27
Date
Oct-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Psychiatry - statistics & numerical data
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - epidemiology - therapy
Bibliometrics
Child
Child Psychiatry - statistics & numerical data
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology - therapy
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Mental Health Services - utilization
Newspapers
Norway - epidemiology
Referral and Consultation - utilization
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The study analyzes changes in types of problems referred to child and adolescent psychiatry in Norway from 1992 to 2001, and investigates if referral practices and media attention account for these changes. METHOD: All referrals to child and adolescent psychiatry in Norway in the period 1992--2001 were analyzed, as well as frequencies of articles in media on psychiatric problems. RESULTS: The shares of referrals for sadness/depression increased from 0.5 % to 15.4 %. Referrals for hyperactivity/attention problems increased from 1.2 % to 13.6 %. The increases could be statistically attributed to decreased use of other referral categories, and/or alternatively to media attention on these and related topics. Convergence between diagnosis and corresponding referral problem increased in the period. CONCLUSIONS: Referrals for sadness/depression and hyperactivity/attention problems increased sharply in Norway during the 1990s. This increase may be attributed to a different understanding of and a sharper look at these problems by referral agencies and by increased media attention.
PubMed ID
15669663 View in PubMed
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Cohort Profile: The Trondheim Early Secure Study (TESS)-a study of mental health, psychosocial development and health behaviour from preschool to adolescence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294862
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2018 Oct 01; 47(5):1401-1401i
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-01-2018
Author
Silje Steinsbekk
Lars Wichstrøm
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2018 Oct 01; 47(5):1401-1401i
Date
Oct-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
PubMed ID
30215720 View in PubMed
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Cohort Profile: The Trondheim Early Secure Study (TESS)-a study of mental health, psychosocial development and health behaviour from preschool to adolescence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300334
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2018 10 01; 47(5):1401-1401i
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
10-01-2018
Author
Silje Steinsbekk
Lars Wichstrøm
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2018 10 01; 47(5):1401-1401i
Date
10-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child Development
Child health
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Female
Health Behavior
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Mental health
Norway - epidemiology
Parent-Child Relations
Personality
PubMed ID
30215720 View in PubMed
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Competence and emotional/behavioural problems in 7-16-year-old Norwegian school children as reported by parents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128734
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2012 Oct;66(5):311-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
Thomas Jozefiak
Bo Larsson
Lars Wichstrøm
Tormod Rimehaug
Author Affiliation
Department of Neuroscience, The Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway. thomas.jozefi ak@ntnu.no
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2012 Oct;66(5):311-9
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Educational Status
Emotions
Ethnic Groups - psychology
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Competency - psychology
Norway - epidemiology
Parents - psychology
Schools
Sex Factors
Abstract
Previous studies from Nordic countries suggest that parent ratings of children's emotional and behavioural problems using the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) are among the lowest in the world. However, there has been no Norwegian population study with acceptable response rates to provide valid Norwegian reference data.
Firstly, to compare CBCL Internalizing, Externalizing, Total Problems and Competence scores of Norwegian children and adolescents with those from 1) previous Norwegian studies, 2) other Nordic countries, and 3) international data. Secondly, to present Norwegian reference data in order to perform these comparisons. Thirdly, to investigate the effects of age, gender, socio-economic and urban/rural status on the CBCL.
A stratified cluster sample of 2582 school children (1302 girls and 1280 boys) was identified from the general Norwegian population and their parents were asked to complete the CBCL.
The response rate was 65.5%. The mean Total Problems score for the whole sample was 14.2 (standard deviation, s = 14.1). Girls were rated as having greater Competence and fewer Total Problems than boys. Younger children had more Total Problems than adolescents. Parents with low education reported more child Total Problems and lower Competence than those with high education. All effect sizes were small, except for the effect of parental education on child Competence, which was moderate.
Total Problems scores were lower than in other societies. The data from this study obtained from one county in central Norway provide an important reference for clinical practice and treatment outcome research.
PubMed ID
22171934 View in PubMed
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Depression from preschool to adolescence - five faces of stability.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature304089
Source
J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2020 Nov 26; :
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-26-2020
Author
Ida Sund Morken
Kristine Rensvik Viddal
Bror Ranum
Lars Wichstrøm
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
Source
J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2020 Nov 26; :
Date
Nov-26-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
The term 'stability' has different meanings, and its implications for the etiology, prevention, and treatment of depression vary accordingly. Here, we identify five types of stability in childhood depression, many undetermined due to a lack of research or inconsistent findings.
Children and parents (n = 1,042) drawn from two birth cohorts in Trondheim, Norway, were followed biennially from ages 4-14 years. Symptoms of major depressive disorder (MDD) and dysthymia were assessed with the Preschool Age Psychiatric Assessment (only parents) and the Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Assessment (age 8 onwards).
(a) Stability of form: Most symptoms increased in frequency. The symptoms' importance (according to factor loadings) was stable across childhood but increased from ages 12-14, indicating that MDD became more coherent. (b) Stability at the group level: The number of symptoms of dysthymia increased slightly until age 12, and the number of symptoms of MDD and dysthymia increased sharply between ages 12-14. (c) Stability relative to the group (i.e., 'rank-order') was modest to moderate and increased from ages 12-14. (d) Stability relative to oneself (i.e., intraclass correlations) was stronger than stability relative to the group and increased from age 12-14. (e) Stability of within-person changes: At all ages, decreases or increases in the number of symptoms forecasted similar changes two years later, but more strongly so between ages 12-14.
Across childhood, while most symptoms of MDD and dysthymia become more frequent, they are equally important. The transition to adolescence is a particularly vulnerable period: The depression construct becomes more coherent, stability increases, the level of depression increases, and such an increase predicts further escalation. Even so, intervention at any time during childhood may have lasting effects on reducing child and adolescent depression.
PubMed ID
33242346 View in PubMed
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Detecting psychiatric disorders in preschoolers: screening with the strengths and difficulties questionnaire.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112763
Source
J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2013 Jul;52(7):728-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Trude Hamre Sveen
Turid Suzanne Berg-Nielsen
Stian Lydersen
Lars Wichstrøm
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway. trude.hamre.sveen@svt.ntnu.no
Source
J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2013 Jul;52(7):728-36
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Questionnaires - standards
Sensitivity and specificity
Single-Blind Method
Abstract
To examine screening efficiency for preschool psychopathology by comparing the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire findings against diagnostic information, and to determine the added value of impact scores and teacher information.
Using a 2-phase sampling design, a population-based sample of 845 children 4 years of age was recruited from community health check-ups in Trondheim, Norway, screen score stratified and oversampled for high screening scores. Blinded to screen ratings, DSM-IV diagnoses were assigned using the Preschool Age Psychiatric Assessment interview, against which the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire scores were compared through receiver operating characteristic analysis.
Emotional and behavioral disorders were identified through parent ratings with a specificity of 88.8% (range, 87.0%-90.6%) and a sensitivity of 65.1% (range, 51.6-78.6%). The negative predictive value was 97.9% (range, 96.8%-98.9%), whereas the positive predictive value was 24.2% (range, 18.0%-30.3%) at a prevalence of 5.2%. Parental ratings identified more behavioral disorders (79.3%) than emotional disorders (59.2%). Screening for any disorder was somewhat less efficient: specificity, 88.9% (range, 87.0%-90.7%); sensitivity, 54.2% (range, 41.8%-66.6%); negative predictive value, 96.4% (range, 95.0%-97.8%); and positive predictive value, 25.9% (range, 19.6%-32.2%) at a prevalence of 6.7%. The area under the curve (AUC) value was 0.83 (range, 0.76-0.90) for emotional and behavioral disorders and 0.76 (range, 0.68-0.83) for any disorder. The prediction accuracy was not improved by impact scores or teacher information.
The results indicate that preschoolers' emotional and behavioral disorders can be screened with the same efficiency as those of older children and adults. Other disorders were identified to a lesser extent. Further research should explore the potential of preschool screening to improve early detection and subsequent intervention.
PubMed ID
23800486 View in PubMed
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