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Altered menstrual cycles in women with a high dietary intake of persistent organochlorine compounds.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61535
Source
Chemosphere. 2004 Aug;56(8):813-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2004
Author
Anna Axmon
Lars Rylander
Ulf Strömberg
Lars Hagmar
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, University Hospital, SE-221 85 Lund, Sweden. anna.axmon@ymed.lu.se
Source
Chemosphere. 2004 Aug;56(8):813-9
Date
Aug-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Animals
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Diet
Female
Fishes
Food Contamination
Geography
Humans
Insecticides - toxicity
Life Style
Menstrual Cycle - drug effects
Oceans and Seas
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - toxicity
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Smoking
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
Dietary exposure to persistent organochlorine compounds (POCs) has been found to affect the menstrual cycle in both animals and humans. In Sweden, the major exposure route for POCs is the consumption of fatty fish from the Baltic Sea. Thus, women who eat relatively large amounts of this fish constitute a suitable study group when investigating a possible association between dietary exposure to POC and menstrual cycle disruption. Questionnaires were sent to the exposed women, as well as to a socioeconomically similar cohort of controls, and information was collected on their menstrual cycles. Since the exposed women tended to smoke more than the controls, all results were adjusted for smoking habits. A cohort comparison found that the exposed women on average had 0.46 (95% confidence interval: 0.03, 0.89) days shorter menstrual cycles than controls. However, within the exposed cohort no effects were found of the proxy variables early life exposure and high consumption of Baltic Sea fatty fish. The results give some support to previous results from studies on women with similar exposure, but are not conclusive with respect to whether there is a causal association between POC exposure and menstrual cycle disruption.
PubMed ID
15251296 View in PubMed
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Association between paternal smoking at the time of pregnancy and the semen quality in sons.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299606
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(11):e0207221
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2018
Author
Jonatan Axelsson
Sally Sabra
Lars Rylander
Anna Rignell-Hydbom
Christian H Lindh
Aleksander Giwercman
Author Affiliation
Molecular Reproductive Medicine, Department of Translational Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(11):e0207221
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Cotinine - blood
Fathers
Female
Humans
Male
Maternal Exposure
Nuclear Family
Paternal Exposure
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Semen Analysis
Smoking - adverse effects - blood
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
Maternal smoking during pregnancy has repeatedly been associated with decreased sperm counts in sons. Nevertheless, our team recently detected a lower total sperm count in the sons of smoking fathers as compared to sons of non-smoking fathers. Since paternal and maternal tobacco smoking often coincide, it is difficult to discriminate whether effects are mediated paternally or maternally when using questionnaire- or register-based studies. Therefore, getting an objective measure of the maternal nicotine exposure level during pregnancy might help disentangling the impact of paternally and maternally derived exposure.
Our aim was to study how paternal smoking at the time of the pregnancy was associated with semen quality in the sons after adjusting for the maternal levels of nicotine exposure during pregnancy.
We recruited 104 men (17-20 years old) from the general Swedish population. The participants answered a questionnaire about paternal smoking. Associations between smoking and semen volume, total sperm count, sperm concentration, morphology and motility were adjusted for levels of the nicotine metabolite cotinine in stored maternal serum samples obtained from rubella screening between the 6th and 35th week of pregnancy. We additionally adjusted for the estimated socioeconomic status.
After adjusting for the maternal cotinine, the men of smoking fathers had 41% lower sperm concentration and 51% lower total sperm count than the men of non-smoking fathers (p = 0.02 and 0.003, respectively). This was robust to the additional adjustment.
Our results suggest a negative association between paternal smoking and sperm counts in the sons, independent of the level maternal nicotine exposure during the pregnancy.
PubMed ID
30462692 View in PubMed
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Association of maternal serum concentrations of 2,2', 4,4'5,5'-hexachlorobiphenyl (CB-153) and 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis (p-chlorophenyl)-ethylene (p,p'-DDE) levels with birth weight, gestational age and preterm births in Inuit and European populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141020
Source
Environ Health. 2010;9:56
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Bogdan J Wojtyniak
Daniel Rabczenko
Bo A G Jönsson
Valentyna Zvezday
Henning S Pedersen
Lars Rylander
Gunnar Toft
Jan K Ludwicki
Katarzyna Góralczyk
Anna Lesovaya
Lars Hagmar
Jens Peter Bonde
Author Affiliation
Department-Centre of Monitoring and Analyses of Population Health, National Institute of Public Health-National Institute of Hygiene, Warsaw, Poland. bogdan@pzh.gov.pl
Source
Environ Health. 2010;9:56
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biological Markers - blood
Birth Weight - drug effects
Cohort Studies
Dichlorodiphenyl Dichloroethylene - blood - toxicity
Environmental Pollutants - blood - toxicity
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Gestational Age
Greenland
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated - blood - toxicity
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature - growth & development
Inuits
Male
Maternal Exposure - adverse effects
Poland
Pregnancy
Pregnant Women
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Ukraine
Abstract
Epidemiological studies on the association between maternal exposure to persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and fetal growth alteration report inconsistent findings which weights in favor of additional studies.
Blood samples were collected from interviewed pregnant women in Greenland (572), Kharkiv (611) and Warsaw (258) and were analyzed for CB-153 and p,p'-DDE by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Data on birth weight, gestational age and preterm birth were obtained for 1322 singleton live births. We examined the association between natural log-transformed serum POPs concentration and birth weight and gestational age using multiple linear regression and the association with prematurity using logistic regression controlling for potential confounding factors.
The median serum concentrations of CB-153 and p,p'-DDE were for Inuit mothers 105.6 and 298.9, for Kharkiv mothers 27.0 and 645.4 and for Warsaw mothers 10.7 and 365.2 ng/g lipids, respectively. Increase in CB-153 concentration by one unit on the log scale in Inuit mothers serum was associated with significant decrease in infant birth weight of -59 g and gestational age by -0.2 week. Decreases observed in the cohorts in Kharkiv (-10 g and -0.1 week) and in Warsaw (-49 g and -0.2 week) were not statistically significant. Increase in p,p'-DDE concentration by one unit on the log scale was associated with a statistically significant decrease in infant birth weight of -39.4 g and -104.3 g and shortening of gestational age of -0.2 week and -0.6 week in the Inuit and Warsaw cohorts, respectively. In the Kharkiv cohort decrease in birth weight (-30.5 g) was not significant, however a shortening of gestational age of -0.2 week per increase in p,p'-DDE concentration by one unit on the log scale was of the borderline significance. There was no significant association between CB-153 and p,p'-DDE concentrations and risk of preterm birth however, in all cohorts the odds ratio was above 1.
In utero exposure to POPs may reduce birth weight and gestational age of newborns however, new insights as to why results vary across studies were not apparent.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20819217 View in PubMed
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Cancer in persons working in dry cleaning in the Nordic countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16481
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2006 Feb;114(2):213-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2006
Author
Elsebeth Lynge
Aage Andersen
Lars Rylander
Håkan Tinnerberg
Marja-Liisa Lindbohm
Eero Pukkala
Pål Romundstad
Per Jensen
Lene Bjørk Clausen
Kristina Johansen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. elsebeth@pubhealth.ku.dk
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2006 Feb;114(2):213-9
Date
Feb-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
U.S. studies have reported an increased risk of esophageal and some other cancers in dry cleaners exposed to tetrachloroethylene. We investigated whether the U.S. findings could be reproduced in the Nordic countries using a series of case-control studies nested in cohorts of laundry and dry-cleaning workers identified from the 1970 censuses in Denmark, Norway, Sweden, and Finland. Dry-cleaning work in the Nordic countries during the period when tetrachloroethylene was the dominant solvent was not associated with an increased risk of esophageal cancer [rate ratio (RR) = 0.76; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.34-1.69], but our study was hampered by some unclassifiable cases. The risks of cancer of the gastric cardia, liver, pancreas, and kidney and non-Hodgkin lymphoma were not significantly increased.Assistants in dry-cleaning shops had a borderline significant excess risk of cervical cancer not found in women directly involved in dry cleaning. We found an excess risk of bladder cancer (RR = 1.44; 95% CI, 1.07-1.93) not associated with length of employment. The finding of no excess risk of esophageal cancer in Nordic dry cleaners differs from U.S. findings. Chance, differences in level of exposure to tetrachloroethylene, and confounding may explain the findings. The overall evidence on bladder cancer in dry cleaners is equivocal.
PubMed ID
16451857 View in PubMed
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Chimney sweeps in Sweden: a questionnaire-based assessment of long-term changes in work conditions, and current eye and airway symptoms.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283968
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2017 Feb;90(2):207-216
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2017
Author
Ayman Alhamdow
Per Gustavsson
Lars Rylander
Kristina Jakobsson
Håkan Tinnerberg
Karin Broberg
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2017 Feb;90(2):207-216
Date
Feb-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cough - epidemiology
Eye Diseases - epidemiology
Fuel Oils
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Personal Protective Equipment - utilization
Respiratory Tract Diseases - epidemiology
Soot - adverse effects
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Wood
Abstract
To explore chimney sweeping work tasks, chimney sweeps' use of protective equipment, and type of fuel used by clients, over time. Further, to assess work-relatedness of current eye and airway symptoms.
In a cross-sectional study in 2011, male Swedish chimney sweeps (n = 483; age 21-69 years) answered a questionnaire about their occupational history and eye and airway symptoms.
Between 1960 and 2010, black-soot-sweeping in private homes was the major task, although it decreased during the time period, for chimney sweeps. Between 1975 and 2010, the use of petroleum oil decreased, whereas the use of pellets and wood increased. Also, the use of gloves and masks increased significantly. Black-soot-sweeping in industry was associated with work-related eye symptoms (prevalence odds ratio POR = 3.76, 95% CI: 1.72-8.24, for every 10% increment of working time, adjusted for age and tobacco smoking). Chimney sweeps also had slightly higher prevalence of cough with increasing black-soot-sweeping (POR = 1.06, 95% CI: 0.99-1.13 for every 10% increment, further adjusted for the use of mask), and the association was more pronounced, although nonsignificant, for black-soot-sweeping in industry (adjusted POR = 1.26, 95% CI: 0.98-1.61).
Chimney sweeping tasks and use of protective equipment as well as type of fuel used by the clients changed significantly over the last 35 years, which may have changed chimney sweeps' exposure to soot. Still, chimney sweeps in Sweden have black-soot-sweeping-related eye and airway symptoms.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27858151 View in PubMed
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Congenital malformations in offspring of women with a history of malignancy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292276
Source
Birth Defects Res. 2017 Feb 15; 109(3):224-233
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Feb-15-2017
Author
Zahra Sabeti Rad
Britt Friberg
Emir Henic
Lars Rylander
Olof Ståhl
Bengt Källén
Göran Lingman
Author Affiliation
Centre of Reproductive Medicine, Skane University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
Source
Birth Defects Res. 2017 Feb 15; 109(3):224-233
Date
Feb-15-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Case-Control Studies
Congenital Abnormalities - etiology
Female
Fertilization in Vitro - methods
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Newborn, Diseases - etiology
Male
Neoplasms - complications - physiopathology
Odds Ratio
Parturition - physiology
Pregnancy
Registries
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Survival after malignancy has increased and the question of risks, including risk for congenital malformations for the offspring of these women has become important. Data on congenital malformations in such offspring are limited.
We compared congenital malformation in offspring, born 1994 to 2011 of women with a history of malignancy (at least 1 year before delivery) with all other offspring. Adjustment for confounders was mainly made by Mantel-Haenszel methodology. Data were obtained by linkage between Swedish national health registers.
We identified 71,954 (4.1%) infants with congenital malformation, of which 47,081 (2.7%) were relatively severe (roughly corresponding to major malformation). Among 7284 infants to women with a history of malignancy 204 relatively severe malformations were found (2.8%; odds ratio [OR] = 1.04; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.91-1.20). After in vitro fertilization, the risk of a relatively severe malformation was significantly increased in women without a history of malignancy (OR = 1.31; 95% CI, 1.24-1.38) and still more in women with such a history (risk ratio = 1.85; 95% CI, 1.08-2.97). However, there were no significant differences neither, for any malformations (OR = 1.04; 95% CI, 0.92-1.16) nor for relatively severe malformations (OR = 1.04; 95% CI, 0.91-1.20), when comparing offspring only after maternal history of malignancy.
No general increase in malformation rate was found in infants born to women with a history of malignancy. A previously known increased risk after in vitro fertilization was verified and it is possible that this risk is further augmented among infants born of women with a history of malignancy. Birth Defects Research 109:224-233, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
PubMed ID
27875028 View in PubMed
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Cotinine Validation of Self-Reported Smoking During Pregnancy in the Swedish Medical Birth Register.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274714
Source
Nicotine Tob Res. 2016 Jan;18(1):79-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2016
Author
Kristina Mattsson
Karin Källén
Anna Rignell-Hydbom
Christian H Lindh
Bo A G Jönsson
Peik Gustafsson
Per Olofsson
Sten A Ivarsson
Lars Rylander
Source
Nicotine Tob Res. 2016 Jan;18(1):79-83
Date
Jan-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cotinine - blood
Female
Fetal Blood - chemistry
Humans
Maternal-Fetal Exchange
Pregnancy - blood - psychology
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Prevalence
Registries
Self Report
Smoking - blood - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Self-reported data on smoking during pregnancy from the Medical Birth Register of Sweden (MBR) are widely used. However, underreporting of such behavior may occur, leading to biases. It is of importance to validate the smoking data in the MBR. The main objective was to investigate the agreement between self-reported smoking data from the MBR and cotinine levels in maternal serum among women from the general population in the region of Skåne, Sweden. We also estimated the transfer of cotinine from mother to fetus.
From a cohort used previously to investigate the relationship between intrauterine environmental exposures and offspring neuropsychiatric outcomes, there were 204 control children retrieved from the MBR with data on maternal smoking in early pregnancy registered. Data on maternal and umbilical cord cotinine at delivery were available for these children from a regional biobank.
There was a high agreement between cotinine levels and MBR smoking data (? = 0.82) and a high correlation between cotinine levels in maternal and umbilical cord serum (r s = 0.90, P
PubMed ID
25895950 View in PubMed
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A cross-sectional study of the association between persistent organochlorine pollutants and diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46956
Source
Environ Health. 2005;4:28
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Lars Rylander
Anna Rignell-Hydbom
Lars Hagmar
Author Affiliation
Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine and Psychiatric Epidemiology, Department of Laboratory Medicine, University Hospital, SE-221 85 Lund, Sweden. lars.rylander@med.lu.se
Source
Environ Health. 2005;4:28
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - chemically induced - epidemiology
Dichlorodiphenyl Dichloroethylene - blood - toxicity
Environmental Pollutants - blood - toxicity
Female
Fisheries
Food chain
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated - blood - toxicity
Logistic Models
Male
Mass Fragmentography
Middle Aged
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - blood - toxicity
Prevalence
Seafood
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Experimental evidence supports the hypothesis that persistent organochlorine pollutants (POPs) may cause type 2 diabetes mellitus, whereas there is no fully convincing epidemiological evidence for such an association. In Sweden the most important source of POP exposure is fatty fish. We have assessed the association between serum levels of POPs and prevalence of diabetes in Swedish fishermen and their wives, with high consumption of fatty fish from the Baltic Sea. METHODS: In 196 men (median age 60 years) and 184 women (median age 64 years), we analyzed 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexachlorobiphenyl (CB-153) and 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)-ethylene (p,p'-DDE) in serum using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The participants were asked if they had diabetes and, if so, since which year and about medication and diet. The Odds Ratios (OR) for diabetes with respect to continuous exposure variables were analyzed with logistic regression, adjusting for potential confounders. Moreover trends of diabetes prevalence with respect to trichotomized exposure variables were tested with Jonckheere-Terpstra's test. RESULTS: Six percent of the men and 5% of the women had diabetes. After confounder adjustment CB-153 was significantly associated with diabetes prevalence using both categorized and continuous exposure data (an increase of 100 ng/g lipid corresponded to an OR of 1.16, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.03, 1.32, p = 0.03). Similar associations were observed for p,p'-DDE (an increase of 100 ng/g lipid corresponded to an OR of 1.05, 95% CI 1.01, 1.09, p = 0.006). Gender stratified analyses showed among men consistent positive associations with CB-153, but a more ambiguous pattern with respect to DDE. In contrast, among the women the associations with p,p'-DDE were stronger than with CB-153. CONCLUSION: The study provides support that POP exposure might contribute to type 2 diabetes mellitus.
PubMed ID
16316471 View in PubMed
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Differences in serum levels of CB-153 and p,p'-DDE, and reproductive parameters between men living south and north in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133138
Source
Reprod Toxicol. 2011 Nov;32(3):261-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2011
Author
Trine B Haugen
Toril Tefre
Gunilla Malm
Bo A G Jönsson
Lars Rylander
Lars Hagmar
Cathrine Bjørsvik
Trine Henrichsen
Thomas Sæther
Yngve Figenschau
Aleksander Giwercman
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Health Sciences, Oslo University College, PO Box 4 St. Olavs plass, N-0130 Oslo, Norway. trine.b.haugen@hf.hio.no
Source
Reprod Toxicol. 2011 Nov;32(3):261-7
Date
Nov-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Dichlorodiphenyl Dichloroethylene - blood
Environmental monitoring
Environmental pollutants - blood
Estradiol - blood
Follicle Stimulating Hormone - blood
Humans
Inhibins - blood
Luteinizing Hormone - blood
Male
Norway
Polychlorinated biphenyls - blood
Reproduction
Sex Hormone-Binding Globulin - metabolism
Sperm Count
Sperm Motility
Testosterone - blood
Young Adult
Abstract
Arctic is contaminated with persistent organochlorine pollutants (POPs), and exposure to these compounds may differ between south and north in Norway. POPs may have negative impact on male reproductive characteristics. We compared serum levels of the CB-153 and p,p'-DDE in men who were born and had lived most of their lifetime south and north (close to or above the Arctic Circle) in Norway. We found no geographical differences in levels of CB-153 (south: 50 ng/g lipid (mean), north: 59 ng/g lipid; p=0.27) or sperm parameters. However, the levels of p,p'-DDE were higher in south than in north (81 ng/g lipid (mean) vs. 66 ng/g lipid; p=0.02), as were the levels of total and free testosterone. The FSH levels were lowest in south. A strong relationship between the CB-153 and the SHBG levels was observed. The regional differences observed for p,p'-DDE, testosterone and FSH were not reflected in the semen quality.
PubMed ID
21736938 View in PubMed
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[Early team assessment relieves the emergency department].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104891
Source
Lakartidningen. 2014 Feb 26-Mar 11;111(9-10):392-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
Bruno Ziegler
Henrik Almroth
Jan Bergman
Eva Jansson
Lars Rylander
Anna Wickbom
Author Affiliation
Universitetssjukhuset i Örebro - Akutkliniken Örebro, Sweden Akutmottagningen - Akutkliniken Örebro, Sweden.
Source
Lakartidningen. 2014 Feb 26-Mar 11;111(9-10):392-4
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bed Occupancy - statistics & numerical data
Cohort Studies
Critical Pathways
Emergency Service, Hospital - organization & administration
Female
Humans
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Nurses
Nurses' Aides
Patient Care Team - organization & administration
Physicians
Sweden
Time Factors
Triage - methods
Abstract
A model for physician-led team triage was evaluated at the Emergency Department at the University hospital of Örebro, Sweden. Data from 1600 patients indicate that this work model reduces length of stay, time to physician assessment, emergency department occupancy, rate of admission and the proportion of patients in need of close monitoring. The project was conducted without any change in the number of physicians, nurses or staff nurses working in the Emergency Department. 
PubMed ID
24570138 View in PubMed
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55 records – page 1 of 6.