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Abstention, alcohol use and risk of myocardial infarction in men and women taking account of social support and working conditions: the SHEEP case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9623
Source
Addiction. 2003 Oct;98(10):1453-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2003
Author
Anders Romelsjö
Maria Branting
Johan Hallqvist
Lars Alfredsson
Niklas Hammar
Anders Leifman
Anders Ahlbom
Author Affiliation
Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs, Stockholm, Sweden. anders.romelsjo@sorad.su.se
Source
Addiction. 2003 Oct;98(10):1453-62
Date
Oct-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - prevention & control
Occupational Health
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Social Support
Stress, Psychological - complications
Sweden - epidemiology
Temperance - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
AIMS: Very few studies indicating that low-moderate alcohol consumption protects from myocardial infarction (MI) controlled for social support and working conditions, which could confound the findings. Therefore, a first aim was to study the risk of non-fatal and total MI in relation to volume of alcohol consumption and measures of social support and working conditions. A second aim was to analyse the impact of the volume of earlier alcohol use in abstainers. DESIGN: Data came from a case-control study, the Stockholm Heart Epidemiology Program (SHEEP), including first MI among Swedish citizens 45-70 years old. SETTING: Stockholm County 1992-94. PARTICIPANTS: There were 1095 cases of MI in men and 471 in women (928 and 372 were non-fatal), and 2339 living controls from the general population. MEASUREMENT: Information about alcohol use at different periods in life and job strain, social anchorage and life control besides pre-existing health problems, smoking, physical activity, socio-economic status and marital status was obtained by a questionnaire from the cases and the controls. FINDINGS: In multivariate logistic regression analyses, the relative risk for MI (especially non-fatal) was reduced among alcohol consumers. RR for non-fatal MI was 0.52 (95% confidence intervals 0.32, 0.85) in men with a consumption of 50-69.9 g 100% ethanol/day and 0.21 (95% confidence interval 0.06, 0.77) in women with a consumption of 30 g or more per day (reference category 0.1-5 g 100% ethanol/day). Men who were abstainers during the previous 1-10 years and with an earlier average consumption of 5-30 g 100% ethanol/day had a significantly lower relative risk compared to such abstainers with an earlier higher consumption. Earlier consumption among abstainers may also have an impact on gender differences in MI. Analyses showed positive interaction between abstention and low life-control in women, but only 4% of the female cases were due to this interaction. There were no other interactions between measures of alcohol use and social anchorage, life control and working situations. CONCLUSION: Alcohol use had a protective impact on MI, with little impact of job strain, social anchorage and life control, giving increased support for a protective impact of low-moderate alcohol use. The level of previous alcohol consumption among male 1-10-year-long abstainers influenced the risk of MI.
PubMed ID
14519183 View in PubMed
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Acid-suppressing drugs and gastroesophageal reflux disease as risk factors for acute pancreatitis--results from a Swedish Case-Control Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172609
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2006 Mar;15(3):141-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2006
Author
Anders Sundström
Kerstin Blomgren
Lars Alfredsson
Bengt-Erik Wiholm
Author Affiliation
Medical Products Agency, Uppsala, Sweden. Anders.Sundstrom@Mpa.se
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2006 Mar;15(3):141-9
Date
Mar-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antacids - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Case-Control Studies
Enzyme Inhibitors - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Female
Gastroesophageal Reflux - complications - drug therapy
Histamine H2 Antagonists - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Humans
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases - complications - drug therapy
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Pancreatitis - epidemiology - etiology
Pharmacoepidemiology
Proton Pump Inhibitors
Registries
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To study risk factors for acute pancreatitis, here with emphasis on gastro-intestinal diseases and their treatments.
Population based case-control study covering four areas in Sweden encompassing 2.2 million inhabitants. Included were 462 incident cases of acute pancreatitis aged 20-85 years, hospitalized from 1 January 1995-31 May 1998, and 1,781 unmatched controls randomly selected from the study base using a population register. Information was captured from medical records and structured telephone interviews.
Current use of H(2) antagonists starting within 6 months of index-date was associated with acute pancreatitis with an adjusted OR of 4.9 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.6-15), and current use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) with an adjusted OR of 3.2 (95%CI 1.4-7.4). For both drug classes, the ORs tended to be higher at higher doses. Gastritis/gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) within the last 12 months not treated with PPIs or H(2)-antagonists and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) not treated with anti-inflammatory or immunosuppressive drugs were associated with development of acute pancreatitis with adjusted odds ratios (OR) of 1.9 (95%CI 1.2-3.0) and 5.1 (95%CI 2.0-13) respectively.
Current IBD without treatment and gastritis/GERD without treatment were found to be associated with increased risks to develop acute pancreatitis but the nature of the latter association needs to be further evaluated. On balance, we judge that the observed associations between current use of H(2)-antagonists and PPIs and increased risk of acute pancreatitis are unlikely to be explained by bias.
PubMed ID
16200654 View in PubMed
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Age-related associations between work over-commitment and zest for work among Swedish employees from a cross-sectional and longitudinal perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289925
Source
Work. 2017; 57(2):269-279
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2017
Author
Roma Runeson-Broberg
Jean-Baptist du Prel
Peter Westerholm
Maria Nordin
Anders Knutsson
Lars Alfredsson
Göran Fahlén
Richard Peter
Author Affiliation
Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Work. 2017; 57(2):269-279
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Health
Occupational Stress - psychology
Reward
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Workload - psychology
Abstract
In aging societies, zest for work may be pivotal when deciding to stay occupationally active longer. Psychosocial work stress is a prevalent public health problem and may have an impact on zest for work. Work over-commitment (WOC) is a personal coping strategy for work stress with excessive striving and a health risk. However, the long-term effect of WOC on zest for work is poorly understood.
To investigate the age-related associations of work over-commitment with zest for work.
During 1996-1998 and 2000-2003, predominantly industrial workers (n?=?2940) participated in the WOLF-Norrland study and responded to a questionnaire referring to socio-demographics, WOC, zest for work, effort-reward imbalance proxies, and mental health. Age-adjusted multiple logistic regressions were performed with original and imputed datasets.
Cross-sectionally, work overcommitted middle-aged employees had an increased prevalence of poor zest for work compared to their contemporaries without WOC (OR: 3.74 [95%-CI 2.19; 6.40]). However, in a longitudinal analysis associations between onset of 'poor zest for work' and the WOC subscales 'need for approval' (OR: 3.29 [95%-CI 1.04; 10.37]) and 'inability to withdraw from work' (OR: 5.14 [95%-CI 1.32; 20.03]) were observed.
The longitudinal findings among older employees could be relevant regarding the expected need to remain occupationally active longer.
PubMed ID
28582947 View in PubMed
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Alcohol as a modifiable lifestyle factor affecting multiple sclerosis risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105402
Source
JAMA Neurol. 2014 Mar;71(3):300-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2014
Author
Anna Karin Hedström
Jan Hillert
Tomas Olsson
Lars Alfredsson
Author Affiliation
Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
JAMA Neurol. 2014 Mar;71(3):300-5
Date
Mar-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Female
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Sclerosis - epidemiology
Registries
Risk
Smoking - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Alcohol consumption may be a modifiable lifestyle factor that affects the risk of developing multiple sclerosis (MS). Results of previous studies have been inconsistent.
To investigate the possible association of alcohol consumption with the risk of developing MS and to relate the influence of alcohol to the effect of smoking.
This report is based on 2 case-control studies: Epidemiological Investigation of Multiple Sclerosis (EIMS) included 745 cases and 1761 controls recruited from April 2005 to June 2011, and Genes and Environment in Multiple Sclerosis (GEMS) recruited 5874 cases and 5246 controls between November 2009 and November 2011. All cases fulfilled the McDonald criteria. Both EIMS and GEMS are population-based studies of the Swedish population aged 16 to 70 years. In EIMS, incident cases of MS were recruited via 40 study centers, including all university hospitals in Sweden. In GEMS, prevalent cases were identified from the Swedish national MS registry. In both studies, controls were randomly selected from the national population register, matched by age, sex, and residential area at the time of disease onset.
Multiple sclerosis status.
There was a dose-dependent inverse association between alcohol consumption and risk of developing MS that was statistically significant in both sexes. In EIMS, women who reported high alcohol consumption had an odds ratio (OR) of 0.6 (95% CI, 0.4-1.0) of developing MS compared with nondrinking women, whereas men with high alcohol consumption had an OR of 0.5 (95% CI, 0.2-1.0) compared with nondrinking men. The OR for the comparison in GEMS was 0.7 (95% CI, 0.6-0.9) for women and 0.7 (95% CI, 0.2-0.9) for men. In both studies, the detrimental effect of smoking was more pronounced among nondrinkers. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE; Alcohol consumption exhibits a dose-dependent inverse association with MS. Furthermore, alcohol consumption is associated with attenuation of the effect of smoking. Our findings may have relevance for clinical practice because they give no support for advising patients with MS to completely refrain from alcohol.
PubMed ID
24395432 View in PubMed
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Ambient air pollution exposures and risk of rheumatoid arthritis: results from the Swedish EIRA case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122271
Source
Ann Rheum Dis. 2013 Jun;72(6):888-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Jaime E Hart
Henrik Källberg
Francine Laden
Tom Bellander
Karen H Costenbader
Marie Holmqvist
Lars Klareskog
Lars Alfredsson
Elizabeth W Karlson
Author Affiliation
Channing Laboratory, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. Jaime.hart@channing.harvard.edu
Source
Ann Rheum Dis. 2013 Jun;72(6):888-94
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Pollution - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Educational Status
Environmental Exposure
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nitrogen Dioxide - analysis
Odds Ratio
Particulate Matter - analysis
Risk factors
Sulfur Dioxide - analysis
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Environmental factors may play a role in the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We examined whether long-term exposures to air pollution were associated with the risk of RA in the Swedish Epidemiological Investigation of Rheumatoid Arthritis Study.
We studied 1497 incident RA cases and 2536 controls. Local levels of particulate matter (PM10) and gaseous pollutants (sulphur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2)) from traffic and home heating were predicted for all residential addresses. We examined the association of an IQR increase (2 µg/m3 for PM10, 8 µg/m3 for SO2 and 9 µg/m3 for NO2) in each pollutant at different time points before symptom onset and average exposure with the risk of all RA and the risk of the rheumatoid factor and anti-citrullinated protein antibody (ACPA) RA phenotypes.
There was no evidence of an increased risk of RA with PM10. Total RA risks were modestly elevated for the gaseous pollutants, but were not statistically significant after adjustment for smoking and education (OR 1.18, 95% CI 0.97 to 1.43 and OR 1.09, 95% CI 0.99 to 1.19 for SO2 and NO2 in the 10th year before onset). Stronger elevated risks were observed for individuals with less than a university education and with the ACPA-negative RA phenotype.
No consistent overall associations between air pollution in the Stockholm area and the risk of RA were observed. However, there was a suggestion of increased risks of RA incidence with increases in NO2 from local traffic and SO2 from home heating sources with stronger associations for the ACPA-negative phenotype.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22833374 View in PubMed
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Analysis of neuropeptide S receptor gene (NPSR1) polymorphism in rheumatoid arthritis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145255
Source
PLoS One. 2010;5(2):e9315
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Mauro D'Amato
Marco Zucchelli
Maria Seddighzadeh
Francesca Anedda
Staffan Lindblad
Juha Kere
Lars Alfredsson
Lars Klareskog
Leonid Padyukov
Author Affiliation
Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
PLoS One. 2010;5(2):e9315
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - epidemiology - genetics - pathology
Case-Control Studies
Female
Gene Frequency
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genotype
Haplotypes
Humans
Incidence
Linkage Disequilibrium
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Receptors, G-Protein-Coupled - genetics
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Polymorphism in the neuropeptide S receptor gene NPSR1 is associated with asthma and inflammatory bowel disease. NPSR1 is expressed in the brain, where it modulates anxiety and responses to stress, but also in other tissues and cell types including lymphocytes, the lungs, and the intestine, where it appears to be up-regulated in inflammation. We sought to determine whether genetic variability at the NPSR1 locus influences the susceptibility and clinical manifestation of rheumatoid arthritis (RA).
From the Epidemiological Investigation of Rheumatoid Arthritis (EIRA) case-control study, 1,888 rheumatoid arthritis patients and 888 controls were genotyped for 19 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) spanning the entire NPSR1 gene and 220 KB of DNA on chromosome 7p14. The association between individual genetic markers and their haplotypic combinations, respectively, and diagnosis of RA, presence of autoantibodies to citrullinated proteins (ACPA), and disease activity score based on 28 joints (DAS28) was tested. There was no association between diagnosis of RA and NPSR1 variants. However, several associations of nominal significance were detected concerning susceptibility to ACPA-negative RA and disease activity measures (DAS28). Among these, the association of SNP rs324987 with ACPA-negative RA [(p=0.004, OR=0.674 (95% CI 0.512-0.888)] and that of SNP rs10263447 with DAS28 [p=0.0002, OR=0.380 (95% CI 0.227-0.635)] remained significant after correction for multiple comparisons.
NPSR1 polymorphism may be relevant to RA susceptibility and its clinical manifestation. Specific alleles at the NPSR1 locus may represent common risk factors for chronic inflammatory diseases, including RA.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20179762 View in PubMed
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Ancient genomes from Iceland reveal the making of a human population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294280
Source
Science. 2018 06 01; 360(6392):1028-1032
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
06-01-2018
Author
S Sunna Ebenesersdóttir
Marcela Sandoval-Velasco
Ellen D Gunnarsdóttir
Anuradha Jagadeesan
Valdís B Guðmundsdóttir
Elísabet L Thordardóttir
Margrét S Einarsdóttir
Kristjan H S Moore
Ásgeir Sigurðsson
Droplaug N Magnúsdóttir
Hákon Jónsson
Steinunn Snorradóttir
Eivind Hovig
Pål Møller
Ingrid Kockum
Tomas Olsson
Lars Alfredsson
Thomas F Hansen
Thomas Werge
Gianpiero L Cavalleri
Edmund Gilbert
Carles Lalueza-Fox
Joe W Walser
Steinunn Kristjánsdóttir
Shyam Gopalakrishnan
Lilja Árnadóttir
Ólafur Þ Magnússon
M Thomas P Gilbert
Kári Stefánsson
Agnar Helgason
Author Affiliation
deCODE Genetics/AMGEN, Inc., Reykjavik Iceland. sunna@decode.is kstefan@deocde.is agnar@decode.is.
Source
Science. 2018 06 01; 360(6392):1028-1032
Date
06-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Biological Evolution
DNA, Ancient
Female
Founder Effect
Gene Pool
Genetic Drift
Genome, Human
Genotype
Humans
Iceland
Male
Phenotype
Population - genetics
Abstract
Opportunities to directly study the founding of a human population and its subsequent evolutionary history are rare. Using genome sequence data from 27 ancient Icelanders, we demonstrate that they are a combination of Norse, Gaelic, and admixed individuals. We further show that these ancient Icelanders are markedly more similar to their source populations in Scandinavia and the British-Irish Isles than to contemporary Icelanders, who have been shaped by 1100 years of extensive genetic drift. Finally, we report evidence of unequal contributions from the ancient founders to the contemporary Icelandic gene pool. These results provide detailed insights into the making of a human population that has proven extraordinarily useful for the discovery of genotype-phenotype associations.
Notes
CommentIn: Science. 2018 Jun 1;360(6392):964-965 PMID 29853673
PubMed ID
29853688 View in PubMed
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Are dietary vitamin D, omega-3 fatty acids and folate associated with treatment results in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis? Data from a Swedish population-based prospective study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290863
Source
BMJ Open. 2017 06 10; 7(6):e016154
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
06-10-2017
Author
Cecilia Lourdudoss
Alicja Wolk
Lena Nise
Lars Alfredsson
Ronald van Vollenhoven
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
BMJ Open. 2017 06 10; 7(6):e016154
Date
06-10-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antirheumatic Agents - therapeutic use
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - drug therapy
Dietary Supplements
Fatty Acids, Omega-3 - administration & dosage
Female
Folic Acid - administration & dosage
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Sweden
Vitamin D - administration & dosage
Vitamins - therapeutic use
Abstract
Dietary intake of vitamin D and omega-3 fatty acids (FA) may be associated with superior response to antirheumatic treatments. In addition, dietary folate intake may be associated with worse response to methotrexate (MTX). The aim of this study was to investigate the association between dietary vitamin D, omega-3 FA, folate and treatment results of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA).
This prospective study was based on data from the Epidemiological Investigation of Rheumatoid Arthritis (EIRA) study, and included 727 patients with early RA from 10 hospitals in Sweden. Data on dietary vitamin D, omega-3 FA and folate intake based on food frequency questionnaires were linked with data on European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) response after 3?months of DMARD treatment. Associations between vitamin D, omega-3 FA, folate and EULAR response were analysed with logistic regression adjusted for potential confounders.
The majority of patients (89.9%) were initially treated with MTX monotherapy and more than half (56.9%) with glucocorticoids. Vitamin D and omega-3 FA were associated with good EULAR response (OR 1.80 (95% CI 1.14 to 2.83) and OR 1.60 (95% CI 1.02 to 2.53), respectively). Folate was not significantly associated with EULAR response (OR 1.20 (95% CI 0.75 to 1.91)). Similar results were seen in a subgroup of patients who were initially treated with MTX monotherapy at baseline.
Higher intake of dietary vitamin D and omega-3 FA during the year preceding DMARD initiation may be associated with better treatment results in patients with early RA. Dietary folate intake was not associated with worse or better response to treatment, especially to MTX. Our results suggest that some nutrients may be associated with enhanced treatment results of DMARDs.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28601838 View in PubMed
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Association between body mass index and anti-citrullinated protein antibody-positive and anti-citrullinated protein antibody-negative rheumatoid arthritis: results from a population-based case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123707
Source
Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken). 2013 Jan;65(1):107-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
Annmarie Wesley
Camilla Bengtsson
Ann-Charlotte Elkan
Lars Klareskog
Lars Alfredsson
Sara Wedrén
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. annmarie.wesley@ki.se
Source
Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken). 2013 Jan;65(1):107-12
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology - immunology
Autoantibodies - blood
Body mass index
Case-Control Studies
Comorbidity
Female
Humans
Male
Matched-Pair Analysis
Middle Aged
Obesity - blood - epidemiology - immunology
Peptides, Cyclic - blood
Reference Values
Risk factors
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Being overweight or obese is associated with many chronic diseases, but previous studies of the association with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have shown inconsistent results. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between body mass index (BMI) and the risk of developing the 2 main subtypes of RA.
At inclusion, cases and controls answered questions about their weight and height and donated blood samples. The presence of antibodies to citrullinated protein antigens (ACPAs) was analyzed among 2,748 cases and 3,444 controls (28% men). Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated using conditional logistic regression.
Compared to those with normal weight (BMI
PubMed ID
22674870 View in PubMed
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The Association between Job Strain and Atrial Fibrillation: Results from the Swedish WOLF Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275780
Source
Biomed Res Int. 2015;2015:371905
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Eleonor I Fransson
Magdalena Stadin
Maria Nordin
Dan Malm
Anders Knutsson
Lars Alfredsson
Peter J M Westerholm
Source
Biomed Res Int. 2015;2015:371905
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Atrial Fibrillation - etiology
Cohort Studies
European Continental Ancestry Group - psychology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk factors
Stress, Psychological - complications
Sweden
Work - physiology - psychology
Abstract
Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common heart rhythm disorder. Several life-style factors have been identified as risk factors for AF, but less is known about the impact of work-related stress. This study aims to evaluate the association between work-related stress, defined as job strain, and risk of AF.
Data from the Swedish WOLF study was used, comprising 10,121 working men and women. Job strain was measured by the demand-control model. Information on incident AF was derived from national registers. Cox proportional hazard regression was used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association between job strain and AF risk.
In total, 253 incident AF cases were identified during a total follow-up time of 132,387 person-years. Job strain was associated with AF risk in a time-dependent manner, with stronger association after 10.7 years of follow-up (HR 1.93, 95% CI 1.10-3.36 after 10.7 years, versus HR 1.11, 95% CI 0.67-1.83 before 10.7 years). The results pointed towards a dose-response relationship when taking accumulated exposure to job strain over time into account.
This study provides support to the hypothesis that work-related stress defined as job strain is linked to an increased risk of AF.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26557661 View in PubMed
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