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The association between parathyroid hormone, vitamin D and bone mineral density in 70-year-old Icelandic women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195328
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2000;11(12):1031-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000
Author
G. Sigurdsson
L. Franzson
L. Steingrimsdottir
H. Sigvaldason
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, University Hospital, Fossvogur, Reykjavik, Iceland. maria@shr.is
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2000;11(12):1031-5
Date
2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon - methods
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Bone Density - physiology
Bone Remodeling - physiology
Calcium - administration & dosage
Cod Liver Oil - administration & dosage
Collagen - urine
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Iceland
Osteocalcin - blood
Parathyroid Hormone - blood
Vitamin D - blood
Abstract
Parathyroid hormone (PTH) may be an important determinant of cortical bone remodeling in the elderly. Vitamin D status is one of the determining factors in this relationship. The aim of this study was to quantify the relationship between serum PTH, vitamin D and bone mineral density (BMD) in elderly women in Reykjavik (64 degrees N), where daily intake of cod liver oil is common and mean calcium intake is high. In PTH correlated inversely with 25(OH)D (r = -0.26, p
PubMed ID
11256894 View in PubMed
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Association between trans fatty acid intake and cardiovascular risk factors in Europe: the TRANSFAIR study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61814
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2000 Feb;54(2):126-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2000
Author
L P van de Vijver
A F Kardinaal
C. Couet
A. Aro
A. Kafatos
L. Steingrimsdottir
J A Amorim Cruz
O. Moreiras
W. Becker
J M van Amelsvoort
S. Vidal-Jessel
I. Salminen
J. Moschandreas
N. Sigfússon
I. Martins
A. Carbajal
A. Ytterfors
G. Poppel
Author Affiliation
Department of Consumer Research and Epidemiology, TNO Nutrition and Food Research Institute, Zeist, The Netherlands. VandeVijver@Voeding.TNO.NL
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2000 Feb;54(2):126-35
Date
Feb-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - chemistry
Aged
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology
Cholesterol - blood
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet Records
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Energy intake
Europe
Fatty Acids - administration & dosage - analysis
Female
Humans
Isomerism
Linear Models
Lipids - blood
Lipoproteins, HDL - blood
Lipoproteins, LDL - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: High intakes of trans fatty acids (TFA) have been found to exert an undesirable effect on serum lipid profiles, and thus may increase the risk for cardiovascular disease. OBJECTIVES: Investigation of the association between TFA intake and serum lipids. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study in eight European countries (Finland, France, Greece, Iceland, The Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, Sweden) among 327 men and 299 women (50-65 y). Using a dietary history method, food consumption was assessed and TFA intake was calculated with recent figures on TFA levels of foods, collected in the TRANSFAIR study. RESULTS: Mean (+/-s.d.) TFA intake was 2.40+/-1.53 g/day for men and 1.98+/-1.49 g/day for women (0.87+/-0.48% and 0. 95+/-0.55% of energy, respectively), with the highest consumption in Iceland and the lowest in the Mediterranean countries. No associations were found between total TFA intake and LDL, HDL or LDL/HDL ratio after adjustment for cardiovascular risk factors. Additional adjustment for other fatty acid clusters resulted in a significant inverse trend between total TFA intake and total cholesterol (Ptrend
PubMed ID
10694783 View in PubMed
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Characteristics of incidence hip fracture cases in older adults participating in the longitudinal AGES-Reykjavik study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature304987
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2021 Feb; 32(2):243-250
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Feb-2021
Author
S S Skuladottir
A Ramel
I Hjaltadottir
L J Launer
M F Cotch
K Siggeirsdottir
V Gudnason
G Sigurdsson
L Steingrimsdottir
T Halldorsson
Author Affiliation
The Icelandic Gerontological Research Institute, Tungata 5, 101, Reykjavik, Iceland. sigrunsskula@gmail.com.
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2021 Feb; 32(2):243-250
Date
Feb-2021
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Poor physical function and body composition my partly predict the risk of falls leading to fracture regardless of bone mineral density.
To examine the relationship between body composition, physical function, and other markers of health with hip fractures in older community-dwelling Icelandic adults.
A prospective cohort of 4782 older adults from the AGES-Reykjavik study. Baseline recruitment took place between 2002 and 2006, and information on hip fractures occurring through 2012 was extracted from clinical records. Using multivariate regression analyses, baseline measures of bone health, physical function, and body composition were compared between those who later experienced hip fractures and to those who did not. Associations with the risk of fractures were quantified using Cox regression.
Mean age was 76.3 years at baseline. After adjustment for age, regression showed that male hip fracture cases compared with non-cases had (mean (95% confidence interval)) significantly lower thigh muscle cross-sectional area - 5.6 cm2 (- 10.2, - 1.1), poorer leg strength - 28 N (- 49, - 7), and decreased physical function as measured by longer timed up and go test 1.1 s (0.5, 1.7). After adjustment for age, female cases had, compared with non-cases, lower body mass index - 1.5 kg/m2 (- 2.1, - 0.9), less lean mass - 1.6 kg (- 2.5, - 0.8), thigh muscle cross-sectional area - 4.4 cm2 (- 6.5, - 2.3), and worse leg strength - 16 N (- 25, - 6). These differences largely persisted after further adjustment for bone mineral density (BMD), suggesting that body composition may contribute to the risk of fracture independent of bone health. When examining the association between these same factors and hip fractures using Cox regression, the same conclusions were reached.
After accounting for age and BMD, older adults who later experienced a hip fracture had poorer baseline measures of physical function and/or body composition, which may at least partly contribute to the risk of falls leading to fracture.
Notes
ErratumIn: Osteoporos Int. 2020 Oct 21;: PMID 33089355
PubMed ID
32808140 View in PubMed
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Characteristics of incidence hip fracture cases in older adults participating in the longitudinal AGES-Reykjavik study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature310992
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2021 Feb; 32(2):243-250
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Feb-2021
Author
S S Skuladottir
A Ramel
I Hjaltadottir
L J Launer
M F Cotch
K Siggeirsdottir
V Gudnason
G Sigurdsson
L Steingrimsdottir
T Halldorsson
Author Affiliation
The Icelandic Gerontological Research Institute, Tungata 5, 101, Reykjavik, Iceland. sigrunsskula@gmail.com.
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2021 Feb; 32(2):243-250
Date
Feb-2021
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Bone Density
Female
Hip Fractures - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Incidence
Male
Postural Balance
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Time and Motion Studies
Abstract
Poor physical function and body composition my partly predict the risk of falls leading to fracture regardless of bone mineral density.
To examine the relationship between body composition, physical function, and other markers of health with hip fractures in older community-dwelling Icelandic adults.
A prospective cohort of 4782 older adults from the AGES-Reykjavik study. Baseline recruitment took place between 2002 and 2006, and information on hip fractures occurring through 2012 was extracted from clinical records. Using multivariate regression analyses, baseline measures of bone health, physical function, and body composition were compared between those who later experienced hip fractures and to those who did not. Associations with the risk of fractures were quantified using Cox regression.
Mean age was 76.3 years at baseline. After adjustment for age, regression showed that male hip fracture cases compared with non-cases had (mean (95% confidence interval)) significantly lower thigh muscle cross-sectional area - 5.6 cm2 (- 10.2, - 1.1), poorer leg strength - 28 N (- 49, - 7), and decreased physical function as measured by longer timed up and go test 1.1 s (0.5, 1.7). After adjustment for age, female cases had, compared with non-cases, lower body mass index - 1.5 kg/m2 (- 2.1, - 0.9), less lean mass - 1.6 kg (- 2.5, - 0.8), thigh muscle cross-sectional area - 4.4 cm2 (- 6.5, - 2.3), and worse leg strength - 16 N (- 25, - 6). These differences largely persisted after further adjustment for bone mineral density (BMD), suggesting that body composition may contribute to the risk of fracture independent of bone health. When examining the association between these same factors and hip fractures using Cox regression, the same conclusions were reached.
After accounting for age and BMD, older adults who later experienced a hip fracture had poorer baseline measures of physical function and/or body composition, which may at least partly contribute to the risk of falls leading to fracture.
Notes
ErratumIn: Osteoporos Int. 2020 Oct 21;: PMID 33089355
PubMed ID
32808140 View in PubMed
Less detail

Correction to: Characteristics of incidence hip fracture cases in older adults participating in the longitudinal AGES-Reykjavik study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature304338
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2020 Dec; 31(12):2501
Publication Type
Published Erratum
Date
Dec-2020
Author
S S Skuladottir
A Ramel
I Hjaltadottir
L J Launer
M F Cotch
K Siggeirsdottir
V Gudnason
G Sigurdsson
L Steingrimsdottir
T Halldorsson
Author Affiliation
The Icelandic Gerontological Research Institute, Tungata 5, 101, Reykjavik, Iceland. sigrunsskula@gmail.com.
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2020 Dec; 31(12):2501
Date
Dec-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Published Erratum
Abstract
The original version of this article, published on 18 august 2020 contained a mistake. An author's name was misspelled.
Notes
ErratumFor: Osteoporos Int. 2020 Aug 18;: PMID 32808140
PubMed ID
33089355 View in PubMed
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Decline in ischaemic heart disease in Iceland and change in risk factor levels.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55245
Source
BMJ. 1991 Jun 8;302(6789):1371-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-8-1991
Author
N. Sigfusson
H. Sigvaldason
L. Steingrimsdottir
I I Gudmundsdottir
I. Stefansdottir
T. Thorsteinsson
G. Sigurdsson
Author Affiliation
Icelandic Heart Association, Reykjavik.
Source
BMJ. 1991 Jun 8;302(6789):1371-5
Date
Jun-8-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blood Pressure - physiology
Cholesterol - blood
Coronary Disease - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Diet - trends
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Female
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Abstract
OBJECTIVE--To monitor trends in mortality and morbidity due to ischaemic heart disease and compare these with observed levels of risk factors from population surveys. DESIGN--Analysis of trends in death rates from ischaemic heart disease in Iceland compared with expected rates computed from population surveys. Risk factor levels together with beta factors obtained from Cox's regression analysis were used to compute expected death rates. Trends in morbidity due to acute myocardial infarction were assessed and secular trends in dietary consumption compared with trends in cholesterol concentrations. SETTING--Reykjavik, Iceland (total population 250,000; over half the population live in Reykjavik). SUBJECTS--12,814 randomly selected residents in the Reykjavik area aged 45-64 (6623 men, 6191 women; 72% and 80% of those invited). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Age adjusted rates of myocardial infarction and deaths from ischaemic heart disease. Expected risk from risk factor levels (smoking, total serum cholesterol concentration, systolic blood pressure) at each unique survey visit. RESULTS--Mortality from ischaemic heart disease has decreased by 17-18% since 1970. During 1981-6 the myocardial infarction attack rate in men under 75 decreased by 23%. A decrease occurred in the level of all three major risk factors after 1968. The fall in the serum cholesterol concentration coincided with a reduction in consumption of dairy fat and margarine. The calculated reduction in risk for the age group 45-64 was about 35%, which was closely similar to the observed decrease in mortality due to ischaemic heart disease in that age group. CONCLUSION--The reduction in mortality from ischaemic heart disease was substantially due to a decreased incidence of myocardial infarction and could be attributed largely to the reduction in risk factors.
PubMed ID
2059715 View in PubMed
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Different beta-casein fractions in Icelandic versus Scandinavian cow's milk may influence diabetogenicity of cow's milk in infancy and explain low incidence of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus in Iceland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32547
Source
Pediatrics. 2000 Oct;106(4):719-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2000
Author
I. Thorsdottir
B E Birgisdottir
I M Johannsdottir
D P Harris
J. Hill
L. Steingrimsdottir
A V Thorsson
Author Affiliation
Unit for Nutrition Research, National University Hospital, Department of Food Science, Reykjavik, Iceland. ingathor@rsp.is
Source
Pediatrics. 2000 Oct;106(4):719-24
Date
Oct-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Animals
Breast Feeding
Case-Control Studies
Caseins - adverse effects - analysis
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Incidence
Infant
Milk - adverse effects - chemistry
Retrospective Studies
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To compare children with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) with controls in Iceland regarding their consumption of cow's milk in infancy, and to investigate the beta-casein fractions in Scandinavian and Icelandic cow's milk. The A1 variant of beta-casein has been shown to be diabetogenic in animal studies, and suggestions have been made that the B variant of beta-casein acts similarly. Differences in the relative proportions of beta-casein fractions might explain the lower incidence of IDDM in Iceland than in Scandinavia. METHODS: A retrospective case-control study on IDDM patients and matching controls was performed in Iceland to compare their diets in infancy. Fifty-five children with IDDM born in Iceland over a 16-year period and randomly collected controls (n = 165) were recruited to the study. Mothers of the children answered questions on breastfeeding habits and on when cow's milk products were introduced. Samples of cow's milk from randomly selected milk batches from the largest consumption areas in Iceland and Scandinavia were collected. The milk samples were freeze-dried and their beta-casein fractions were analyzed using capillary electrophoresis. RESULTS: No significant difference was found between IDDM patients and controls in the frequency and duration of breastfeeding or the first introduction of cow's milk products. The analyses of milk samples showed that the percentage of the A1 and B variants of beta-casein in Icelandic milk was significantly lower than in the milk from the Scandinavian countries. CONCLUSIONS: Cow's milk consumption in infancy is not related to IDDM in Iceland. The lower fraction of A1 and B beta-caseins in Icelandic cow's milk may explain why there is a lower incidence of IDDM in Iceland than in Scandinavia.
PubMed ID
11015514 View in PubMed
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European food and nutrition policies in action. Icelandic nutrition policy: success through compromise.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61861
Source
WHO Reg Publ Eur Ser. 1998;73:87-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
L. Steingrimsdóttir
Author Affiliation
Icelandic Nutritional Council, Reykjavik, Iceland.
Source
WHO Reg Publ Eur Ser. 1998;73:87-91
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Consumer Participation
Food Habits - ethnology
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Iceland
Nutrition Policy - legislation & jurisprudence - trends
Program Development
PubMed ID
9935292 View in PubMed
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Iodine status of adolescent girls in a population changing from high to lower fish consumption.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96659
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2010 Jun 16;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-16-2010
Author
I. Gunnarsdottir
B E Gunnarsdottir
L. Steingrimsdottir
A. Maage
A J Johannesson
I. Thorsdottir
Author Affiliation
[1] Unit for Nutrition Research, University of Iceland & Landspitali University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland [2] Faculty of Food Science and Human Nutrition, School of Health Sciences, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2010 Jun 16;
Date
Jun-16-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Objectives:During the last decades, fish and milk consumption has decreased considerably in Iceland, especially among adolescents. As these food items are important dietary iodine (I) sources, the aim of the study was to assess the iodine status and dietary pattern of adolescent girls in a population changing from a high to lower consumption of milk and fish.Subjects/Methods:Subjects were randomly selected adolescent girls (16-20 years old, n=112). A validated Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ) was used to evaluate food consumption and compare it with food-based dietary guidelines for milk and dairy products (2-3 portions/day) and fish (>/=2 times/week). Urine samples were collected for measuring urinary iodine (U-I) and creatinine (Cr) and blood samples for measuring serum thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH).Results:Milk and dairy products provided 43% and fish provided 24% of the total dietary I. More than 65% of the girls consumed fish less than twice a week, and 40% consumed less than two portions of milk and dairy products per day. The median U-I concentration was 200 mug/l and the U-I/Cr ratio 138 mug I/g Cr. High intake of milk was associated with higher urinary iodine concentration, but fish intake was not found to be directly associated with urinary iodine concentration.Conclusions:Iodine status of Icelandic adolescent girls is within the optimal range defined by the World Health Organization. It is important to monitor both iodine status and the iodine concentration of important sources of iodine, as both dietary habits and composition of food might change with time.European Journal of Clinical Nutrition advance online publication, 16 June 2010; doi:10.1038/ejcn.2010.100.
PubMed ID
20551966 View in PubMed
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Maternal diet in early and late pregnancy in relation to weight gain.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29325
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2006 Mar;30(3):492-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2006
Author
A S Olafsdottir
G V Skuladottir
I. Thorsdottir
A. Hauksson
L. Steingrimsdottir
Author Affiliation
Public Health Institute of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2006 Mar;30(3):492-9
Date
Mar-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anthropometry
Birth weight
Body mass index
Diet
Dietary Sucrose - administration & dosage
Eating - physiology
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Life Style
Logistic Models
Overweight - physiology
Pregnancy - physiology
Pregnancy Complications - physiopathology
Pregnancy outcome
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Weight Gain - physiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To identify dietary factors related to the risk of gaining weight outside recommendations for pregnancy weight gain and birth outcome.Design:An observational study with free-living conditions.Subjects:Four hundred and ninety five healthy pregnant Icelandic women. METHODS: The dietary intake of the women was estimated with a semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire covering food intake together with lifestyle factors for the previous 3 months. Questionnaires were filled out at between 11 and 15 weeks and between 34 and 37 weeks gestation. Comparison of birth outcome between the three weight gain groups was made with ANOVA and Bonferroni post hoc tests. Dietary factors related to at least optimal and excessive weight gain during pregnancy were represented with logistic regression controlling for potential confounding. RESULTS: Of the women, 26% gained suboptimal and 34% excessive weight during pregnancy. Women in late pregnancy with at least optimal, compared with women with suboptimal, weight gain were eating more (OR = 3.32, confidence interval (CI)=1.81-6.09, P
PubMed ID
16331301 View in PubMed
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18 records – page 1 of 2.