Skip header and navigation

Refine By

5 records – page 1 of 1.

An outbreak of Listeria monocytogenes serotype 3a infections from butter in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198523
Source
J Infect Dis. 2000 May;181(5):1838-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2000
Author
O. Lyytikäinen
T. Autio
R. Maijala
P. Ruutu
T. Honkanen-Buzalski
M. Miettinen
M. Hatakka
J. Mikkola
V J Anttila
T. Johansson
L. Rantala
T. Aalto
H. Korkeala
A. Siitonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, National Public Health Institute, FIN-00300 Helsinki, Finland. outi.lyytikainen@ktl. fi.
Source
J Infect Dis. 2000 May;181(5):1838-41
Date
May-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Butter - microbiology
Case-Control Studies
Child
Cross Infection - epidemiology
Dairying
Disease Outbreaks
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Listeria monocytogenes - classification
Listeriosis - epidemiology - etiology - transmission
Male
Middle Aged
Serotyping
Abstract
In February 1999, an outbreak of listeriosis caused by Listeria monocytogenes serotype 3a occurred in Finland. All isolates were identical. The outbreak strain was first isolated in 1997 in dairy butter. This dairy began delivery to a tertiary care hospital (TCH) in June 1998. From June 1998 to April 1999, 25 case patients were identified (20 with sepsis, 4 with meningitis, and 1 with abscess; 6 patients died). Patients with the outbreak strain were more likely to have been admitted to the TCH than were patients with other strains of L. monocytogenes (60% vs. 8%; odds ratio, 17.3; 95% confidence interval, 2.8-136.8). Case patients admitted to the TCH had been hospitalized longer before cultures tested positive than had matched controls (median, 31 vs. 10 days; P=.008). An investigation found the outbreak strain in packaged butter served at the TCH and at the source dairy. Recall of the product ended the outbreak.
PubMed ID
10823797 View in PubMed
Less detail

Infertility in women participating in a screening program for cervical cancer in Helsinki.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature237593
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1986;65(8):823-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
1986
Author
M L Rantala
A I Koskimies
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1986;65(8):823-5
Date
1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Female
Finland
Humans
Infertility, Female - epidemiology - etiology
Mass Screening
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - epidemiology
Abstract
The purpose of the present study was to establish the occurrence of infertility in Finnish women aged 30, 35 and 40 years. The study is based on an interview by questionnaire carried out on women participating in screening for cancer by Pap smear. The participation rate is generally about 60%. A total of 4,879 women were interviewed between May 1981 and April 1982. 149 incomplete replies were discarded and an additional 528 women not at risk of conception were excluded. The final analysis included 4,202 women. Actual infertility, i.e., failure to establish pregnancy at the time of interview, occurred in 438 women (10.4%). The overall infertility rate was 15.4%. The primary infertility rate (5%) seems to be similar in all the age groups interviewed. Secondary infertility increased among women aged 30-40 years, from 4.1 to 9.9%. Actual infertility increased highly significantly between the age groups 30 and 40 years. A limited number of women are permanently infertile, but the percentage of those who at some point in their lives are involuntarily childless is higher.
PubMed ID
3825520 View in PubMed
Less detail

Investigation of increased listeriosis revealed two fishery production plants with persistent Listeria contamination in Finland in 2010.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259027
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2014 Nov;142(11):2261-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2014
Author
U-M Nakari
L. Rantala
A. Pihlajasaari
S. Toikkanen
T. Johansson
C. Hellsten
S M Raulo
M. Kuusi
A. Siitonen
R. Rimhanen-Finne
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2014 Nov;142(11):2261-9
Date
Nov-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Disease Outbreaks
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Fisheries
Food Contamination - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Food Microbiology
Food-Processing Industry
Humans
Incidence
Listeria - classification - pathogenicity
Listeriosis - diagnosis - epidemiology
Male
Registries
Risk assessment
Abstract
In 2010, a marked increase in listeriosis incidence was observed in Finland. Listeria monocytogenes PFGE profile 96 was responsible for one-fifth of the reported cases and a cluster of PFGE profile 62 was also detected. Investigations revealed two fishery production plants with persistent Listeria contamination. It appears likely that the plants were at least partly responsible for the increase of listeriosis. Epidemiological investigation revealed that 57% (31/54) of cases with underlying immunosuppressive condition or medication reported eating gravad or cold-smoked fish. Two public notices were issued by THL and Evira informing which groups were most at risk from the effects of listeriosis and should therefore be cautious in consuming certain products. Systematic sampling of foods and adequate epidemiological investigation methods are required to identify the sources of Listeria infections. Continuous control measures at fishery production plants producing risk products are essential.
PubMed ID
24476659 View in PubMed
Less detail

Outbreak of hospital-acquired gastroenteritis and invasive infection caused by Listeria monocytogenes, Finland, 2012.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283336
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2016 Oct;144(13):2732-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2016
Author
A. Jacks
A. Pihlajasaari
M. Vahe
A. Myntti
S-S Kaukoranta
N. Elomaa
S. Salmenlinna
L. Rantala
K. Lahti
S. Huusko
M. Kuusi
A. Siitonen
R. Rimhanen-Finne
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2016 Oct;144(13):2732-42
Date
Oct-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Animals
Cross Infection - microbiology
Female
Finland
Food Microbiology
Foodborne Diseases - microbiology
Gastroenteritis - microbiology
Gelatin - analysis
Humans
Listeria monocytogenes - isolation & purification
Listeriosis - microbiology
Male
Meat Products - microbiology
Middle Aged
Abstract
During one week in July 2012, two patients from the same ward at the municipal hospital in Vaasa, Finland, were diagnosed with septicaemia caused by Listeria monocytogenes. An outbreak investigation revealed eight concomitant cases of febrile gastroenteritis caused by L. monocytogenes on the same ward. Median age of the cases was 82 years and median incubation time for listerial gastroenteritis was 21 h (range 9-107). An additional 10 cases of invasive listeriosis caused by the same outbreak strain were identified across the whole country during the summer of 2012. Environmental investigation at the affected municipal hospital ward revealed ready-sliced meat jelly as the suspected source of the infection. During inspection of the meat jelly production plant, one pooled sample taken from a floor drain and a trolley wheel in the food processing environment was positive for the outbreak strain of L. monocytogenes. After the producer stopped the production of meat jelly, no further cases of listeriosis with the outbreak strain were identified via nationwide surveillance.
PubMed ID
26493730 View in PubMed
Less detail

Use of phenotyping and genotyping to verify transmission of Escherichia coli O157:H7 from dairy farms.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190573
Source
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2002 Mar;21(3):189-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2002
Author
E. Lahti
M. Eklund
P. Ruutu
A. Siitonen
L. Rantala
P. Nuorti
T. Honkanen-Buzalski
Author Affiliation
National Veterinary and Food Research Institute (EELA), Box 45 (Hämeentie 57), 00581 Helsinki, Finland. elina.tast@eela.fi
Source
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2002 Mar;21(3):189-95
Date
Mar-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Animals
Cattle
Child
Child, Preschool
Dairying
Disease Reservoirs - veterinary
Electrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Field
Escherichia coli Infections - microbiology - transmission - veterinary
Escherichia coli O157 - genetics - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Feces - microbiology
Finland - epidemiology
Genotype
Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome - microbiology - veterinary
Humans
Phenotype
Abstract
A total of 80 human infections by Escherichia coli O157:H7 were documented in Finland in 1997 and 1998. Most were sporadic and their sources undetermined. Five cases not associated with one another, one of which led to secondary transmission within a family, could be traced to five different dairy farms. These five case patients (age range 2-17 years, median age 3 years) were hospitalised with bloody diarrhoea; two of them developed haemolytic uraemic syndrome. All nine human isolates obtained were sorbitol negative, carried the verocytotoxin 2 and eae genes, and produced verocytotoxin and enterohaemolysin. The phage and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis types of the human and bovine isolates from the corresponding farms were indistinguishable. The cattle (20-70 animals per farm) were monitored for up to 2 years after the human cases. The proportion of cattle excreting the type that caused the human infections varied from 3.2 to 66.7% when sampled soon after the human cases, and from 0.0 to 5.3% about a year or so later. On most of the farms, the animals excreted the pathogen intermittently. On one farm, Escherichia coli O157 isolates with other characteristics were also occasionally isolated. Although the infections were traced back to the farms, it could not be established whether the source was unpasteurised milk or direct or indirect contact with cattle. The results of this study emphasise the need for special recommendations for children visiting or living on a farm to prevent these infections.
PubMed ID
11957020 View in PubMed
Less detail