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Age at acquisition of Helicobacter pylori infection: comparison of a high and a low prevalence country.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35031
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1996;28(2):181-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
P. Lindkvist
D. Asrat
I. Nilsson
E. Tsega
G L Olsson
B. Wretlind
J. Giesecke
Author Affiliation
Division of Infectious Diseases, Huddinge Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1996;28(2):181-4
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Distribution
Age of Onset
Antigens, Bacterial - analysis
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Cross-Sectional Studies
Developing Countries
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Ethiopia - epidemiology
Female
Helicobacter Infections - epidemiology - immunology
Helicobacter pylori - immunology - isolation & purification
Humans
Incidence
Male
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Serologic Tests
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Helicobacter pylori (HP) is now generally accepted as the main aetiological agent in chronic active gastritis and peptic ulcer. Infection with HP is widespread, but the routes of transmission are still unclear. Several studies have shown increasing prevalence of antibodies against HP with age. In developing countries, age at peak incidence of seroconversion is probably considerably lower than in developed countries. We performed a cross-sectional study to determine the age at maximum incidence of seroconversion to HP in a high-prevalence country (Ethiopia) and in a low-prevalence country (Sweden). Sera from 242 Ethiopian children, aged 2-14 years and from 295 Swedish children aged 1-15 years were analysed using an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for detecting immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies. In Ethiopia, a comparison was made of a local and a reference strain for preparation of the antigen, but there was little difference in outcome. A comparison between antigen prepared from the reference strain and the pooled antigen used in the Swedish study also showed little difference. The sharpest rise in seroprevalence was found in the age range 2-4 years. Among 4-year-olds, some 60% had already seroconverted, and among 12-year-olds almost 100% had done so. In Sweden, the sharpest rise appeared between the ages of 9 and 10 years. Above 10 years of age seroprevalence was around 20%. Infection with HP is acquired in early childhood in Ethiopia, but somewhat later, although still before the teens, in Sweden. To determine properly the risk factors for infection with HP, possible exposure must be assessed around the age of seroconversion, since seropositivity may remain for a long time but environmental factors may have changed since primary infection.
PubMed ID
8792487 View in PubMed
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Alcohol consumption is associated with reduced risk of Type 2 diabetes and autoimmune diabetes in adults: results from the Nord-Tr√łndelag health study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124182
Source
Diabet Med. 2013 Jan;30(1):56-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
B. Rasouli
A. Ahlbom
T. Andersson
V. Grill
K. Midthjell
L. Olsson
S. Carlsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. bahareh.rasouli@ki.se
Source
Diabet Med. 2013 Jan;30(1):56-64
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Risk factors
Abstract
We investigated the influence of different aspects of alcohol consumption on the risk of Type 2 diabetes and autoimmune diabetes in adults.
We used data from the Nord-Trøndelag Health Survey (HUNT) study, in which all adults aged = 20 years from Nord-Trondelag County were invited to participate in three surveys in 1984-1986, 1995-1997 and 2006-2008. Patients with diabetes were identified using self-reports, and participants with onset age = 35 years were classified as having Type 2 diabetes if they were negative for anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase (n = 1841) and as having autoimmune diabetes if they were positive for anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase (n = 140). Hazard ratios of amount and frequency of alcohol use, alcoholic beverage choice, and binge drinking and alcohol use disorders were estimated.
Moderate alcohol consumption (adjusted for confounders) was associated with a reduced risk of Type 2 diabetes in men, but not in women (hazard ratio for men 10-15 g/day 0.48, 95% CI 0.28-0.77; hazard ratio for women = 10 g/day 0.81, 95% CI 0.33-1.96). The reduced risk was primarily linked to consumption of wine [hazard ratio 0.93, 95% CI 0.87-0.99 (per g/day)]. No increased risk was seen in participants reporting binge drinking or in problem drinkers. The results were also compatible with a reduced risk of autoimmune diabetes associated with alcohol consumption [hazard ratio 0.70, 95% CI 0.45-1.08 (frequent consumption) and hazard ratio 0.36, 95% CI 0.13-0.97 (2-7 g/day)].
Moderate alcohol consumption associates with reduced risk of both Type 2 diabetes and autoimmune diabetes. A protective effect of alcohol intake may be limited to men. High alcohol consumption does not seem to carry an increased risk of diabetes.
PubMed ID
22612671 View in PubMed
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[Anti-smoking campaign in Skaraborg district -- nursing personnel only moderately interested]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature68104
Source
Vardfacket. 1979 May 11;3(9):62-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-11-1979
Author
L. Olsson
Source
Vardfacket. 1979 May 11;3(9):62-3
Date
May-11-1979
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Health education
Humans
Nursing Staff
Smoking - prevention & control
Sweden
PubMed ID
258079 View in PubMed
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Are regional variations in ischaemic heart disease related to differences in coronary risk factors? The project 'myocardial infarction in mid-Sweden'.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature48673
Source
Eur Heart J. 1991 Mar;12(3):309-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1991
Author
C. Nerbrand
L. Olsson
K. Svärdsudd
S. Kullman
G. Tibblin
Author Affiliation
Uppsala University, Department of Family Medicine, Sweden.
Source
Eur Heart J. 1991 Mar;12(3):309-14
Date
Mar-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Angina Pectoris - blood - epidemiology - mortality
Body mass index
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Exercise
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology
Lipoproteins, HDL Cholesterol - blood
Lipoproteins, LDL Cholesterol - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - blood - epidemiology - mortality
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Survival Rate
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
In a previous report, a large regional variation was reported in total mortality and mortality rate from ischaemic heart disease (IHD) in mid-Sweden. In this report, IHD prevalence and risk factor data are presented. A postal questionnaire was sent out to a random sample of men aged 45-64 years in each of 40 communities. 14,675 men (88%) responded. Based on a validity study, IHD cases were defined as those with a history of myocardial infarction and/or angina pectoris. Age, smoking habits, antihypertensive treatment, body mass index, food habits, stress and physical activity during leisure time were used as risk factors. IHD prevalence showed the same geographical variation as IHD mortality, with a low prevalence in the east and a high prevalence in the west. There was a moderate variation in risk factor levels over the 40 communities. When this variation was taken into account the geographical IHD variation was somewhat smaller but still substantial. Other factors may involve socio-economics, drinking water qualities, mineral soil content or other environmental factors. Which of these cause the largest IHD variation is at present unknown, but is subject to systematic examination in this project.
PubMed ID
2040312 View in PubMed
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Association studies on 11 published colorectal cancer risk loci.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142026
Source
Br J Cancer. 2010 Aug 10;103(4):575-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-10-2010
Author
S. von Holst
S. Picelli
D. Edler
C. Lenander
J. Dalén
F. Hjern
N. Lundqvist
U. Lindforss
L. Påhlman
K. Smedh
A. Törnqvist
J. Holm
M. Janson
M. Andersson
S. Ekelund
L. Olsson
S. Ghazi
N. Papadogiannakis
A. Tenesa
S M Farrington
H. Campbell
M G Dunlop
A. Lindblom
Author Affiliation
Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm S17176, Sweden.
Source
Br J Cancer. 2010 Aug 10;103(4):575-80
Date
Aug-10-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Colorectal Neoplasms - epidemiology - genetics
Female
Genetic Association Studies
Genetic Loci
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genome-Wide Association Study
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Risk factors
Sweden
Abstract
Recently, several genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have independently found numerous loci at which common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) modestly influence the risk of developing colorectal cancer. The aim of this study was to test 11 loci, reported to be associated with an increased or decreased risk of colorectal cancer: 8q23.3 (rs16892766), 8q24.21 (rs6983267), 9p24 (rs719725), 10p14 (rs10795668), 11q23.1 (rs3802842), 14q22.2 (rs4444235), 15q13.3 (rs4779584), 16q22.1 (rs9929218), 18q21.1 (rs4939827), 19q13.1 (rs10411210) and 20p12.3 (rs961253), in a Swedish-based cohort.
The cohort was composed of 1786 cases and 1749 controls that were genotyped and analysed statistically. Genotype-phenotype analysis, for all 11 SNPs and sex, age of onset, family history of CRC and tumour location, was performed.
Of eleven loci, 5 showed statistically significant odds ratios similar to previously published findings: 8q23.3, 8q24.21, 10p14, 15q13.3 and 18q21.1. The remaining loci 11q23.1, 16q22.1, 19q13.1 and 20p12.3 showed weak trends but somehow similar to what was previously published. The loci 9p24 and 14q22.2 could not be confirmed. We show a higher number of risk alleles in affected individuals compared to controls. Four statistically significant genotype-phenotype associations were found; the G allele of rs6983267 was associated to older age, the G allele of rs1075668 was associated with a younger age and sporadic cases, and the T allele of rs10411210 was associated with younger age.
Our study, using a Swedish population, supports most genetic variants published in GWAS. More studies are needed to validate the genotype-phenotype correlations.
Notes
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Cites: Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2009 Feb;18(2):616-2119155440
Cites: Gastroenterology. 2009 Jan;136(1):131-719010329
Cites: Cancer Res. 2008 Dec 1;68(23):9982-619047180
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Cites: N Engl J Med. 2000 Jul 13;343(2):78-8510891514
PubMed ID
20648012 View in PubMed
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Cardiac arrest during anaesthesia. A computer-aided study in 250,543 anaesthetics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature38371
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 1988 Nov;32(8):653-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1988
Author
G L Olsson
B. Hallén
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatric Anaesthesia, St Görans Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 1988 Nov;32(8):653-64
Date
Nov-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Anesthesia - adverse effects - mortality
Anesthetics - adverse effects
Child
Computer Systems
Female
Heart Arrest - etiology - mortality
Hospital Information Systems
Humans
Male
Medical Audit
Operating Room Information Systems
Sweden
Abstract
With the aid of a computer-based anaesthetic record-keeping system, all cardiac arrests during anaesthesia at the Karolinska Hospital between July 1967 and December 1984 were retrieved. There were a total of 170 cardiac arrests and 250,543 anaesthetics in the data file, which gives an incidence of 6.8 cardiac arrests per 10,000 anaesthetics. Sixty patients died, constituting a mortality of 2.4 per 10,000 anaesthetics: 42 were considered as inevitable deaths (rupture of aortic or cerebral aneurysm, multitrauma, etc.); 13 cases of cardiac arrest were considered as non-anaesthetic, i.e. complications due to surgery and other procedures. Nine of these patients died. 115 cases of cardiac arrest were considered as caused by the anaesthetic and nine of these patients died. Thus mortality caused by anaesthesia was 0.3 per 10,000 anaesthetics. The most common cause of cardiac arrest due to anaesthesia was hypoxia because of ventilatory problems (27 patients), postsuccinylcholine asystole (23 patients) and post-induction hypotension (14 patients). The highest mortality was seen when spinal or epidural anaesthetics were given to patients with impaired physical status including hypovolaemia. The incidence of cardiac arrest has declined considerably during the period studied, and this coincides with an increasing number of qualified anaesthetists employed in the department during the same period.
PubMed ID
3213390 View in PubMed
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[Circulatory disturbances during anaesthesia. A computer-aided analysis of 150,000 anaesthetic records 1967-1977 of the Karolinska hospital (Stockholm) (author's transl)]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature40837
Source
Anesth Analg (Paris). 1981;38(11-12):617-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
1981
Author
B. Hallén
G L Olsson
H. Selander
Source
Anesth Analg (Paris). 1981;38(11-12):617-20
Date
1981
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Anesthesia - adverse effects
Arrhythmia - etiology
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Computers
English Abstract
Female
Heart Arrest - etiology
Humans
Infant
Male
Medical Records
Middle Aged
Risk
Sweden
Abstract
The computerized anaesthetic record-keeping system at the Karolinska hospital at present (1980) contains anaesthetic records from approximately 200,000 cases. In order to evaluate the importance of circulatory disturbances during routine anaesthetic work, all records from 1967-1977 were searched for notes concerning complications. 5,996 anaesthetics were thus retrieved, having a total of 7,296 complications. This corresponds to an overall frequency of slightly more than 4 p. cent. Circulatory disturbances amounted to approximately 10 p. cent of all complications. Arrhythmias were common. Serious troubles i. e. circulatory arrests were very rare and these cases were studied individually. Differences in the frequency of complications as correlated to the preanaesthetic status of the patient including the risk group and diagnosis could be demonstrated. It is concluded that circulatory complications during anaesthesia exhibit patterns that can be analyzed from data collected during routine anaesthetic work provided a computerized anaesthetic record-keeping system is used.
PubMed ID
7114511 View in PubMed
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ECG abnormalities in patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage and intracranial tumours.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature26066
Source
J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 1987 Oct;50(10):1375-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1987
Author
A. Rudehill
G L Olsson
K. Sundqvist
E. Gordon
Author Affiliation
Department of Anaesthesia, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 1987 Oct;50(10):1375-81
Date
Oct-1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Arrhythmia - epidemiology - etiology
Brain Neoplasms - complications - physiopathology
Child
Electrocardiography
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Subarachnoid Hemorrhage - complications - physiopathology
Sweden
Abstract
The incidence of and possible factors influencing ECG abnormalities were analysed in one patient group with subarachnoid haemorrhages (n = 406) and another with intracranial tumours (n = 400). The highest incidence of each ECG abnormality was always found in the patients with subarachnoid haemorrhages. In this group an ECG pattern, possibly attributable to the cerebral disease and comprising abnormalities of the T and U waves and prolongation of the Q-Tc interval, was frequently identified.
PubMed ID
3681317 View in PubMed
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Genetic basis of the K(0) phenotype in the Swedish population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63238
Source
Transfusion. 2005 Apr;45(4):545-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2005
Author
Elisabet S Wester
Jill R Storry
Karin Schneider
Birgitta Nilsson Sojka
Joyce Poole
Martin L Olsson
Author Affiliation
Blood Center, University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
Source
Transfusion. 2005 Apr;45(4):545-9
Date
Apr-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alleles
Alternative Splicing
Codon, Nonsense - genetics
Family Health
Female
Genetics, Population
Humans
Introns
Kell Blood-Group System - genetics
Male
Pedigree
Phenotype
Point Mutation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The absence of all Kell blood group antigens (K(0) phenotype) is very rare. K(0) persons, however, can produce clinically significant anti-Ku (K5) after transfusion and/or pregnancy and require K(0) blood for transfusion. Ten alleles giving rise to the K(0) phenotype have been reported: different populations were studied although none from Scandinavia. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: Three K(0) samples were identified by blood banks in Sweden (Uppsala, Umeå, and Linköping) during a 20-year period. Kell antigen typing was performed with standard serologic techniques by the respective blood banks and K(0) status was confirmed by the International Blood Group Reference Laboratory in Bristol, England. Polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing of the KEL coding region (exons 1-19) was performed on genomic DNA. RESULTS: The Uppsala K(0) was homozygous for a 1540C>T substitution in exon 13, leading to an immediate stop codon. The Umeå K(0) was homozygous for 1023delG in exon 8 that results in a frameshift and a premature stop codon in exon 9. In the Linköping K(0), a previously reported mutation g>a at +1 of intron 3 was found. CONCLUSION: Two novel and one previously reported null alleles at the KEL locus are described. The identified nonsense mutations abolish expression of the Kell glycoprotein and are thus responsible for the K(0) phenotype in these Swedish families.
PubMed ID
15819675 View in PubMed
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24 records – page 1 of 3.