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125 records – page 1 of 13.

Acute abdomen in the surgical emergency room. Who is taken care of when for what?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature40569
Source
Acta Chir Scand. 1982;148(2):141-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1982
Author
L. Janzon
C I Rydén
B. Zederfeldt
Source
Acta Chir Scand. 1982;148(2):141-8
Date
1982
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdomen, Acute - diagnosis - epidemiology
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Appendicitis - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Diverticulitis - epidemiology
Female
Gallbladder Diseases - epidemiology
Gastritis - epidemiology
Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage - epidemiology
Hernia - epidemiology
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Intestinal Obstruction - epidemiology
Kidney Calculi - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Pancreatitis - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Sex Factors
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
During 1977, 5279 male and 4616 female visits (9895 in all) for acute abdominal conditions were made to the emergency room at the Department of Surgery in Malmö, Sweden. Twice as many patients were seen on Mondays and Tuesdays as on Saturdays. More than 50% of the visits were classified as non-specific abdominal pain or gastritis. The highest incidence of these two conditions was found in the 20-29-year age group and 2-3 times as many patients in this age group were seen on Mondays as on Saturdays and Sundays. It is concluded that studies on the age- and sex-specific incidence rates of different abdominal disorders should be of great value for proper planning of diagnostic and therapeutic resources and further of importance for the planning of the education and training of the general surgeon. Differences in the age- and sex-specific incidence rates as well as differences in the incidence rates from one time period to another illustrate the value of retrospective studies as a basis for future prospective studies regarding cause and potential for prevention of acute abdominal diseases.
PubMed ID
6983198 View in PubMed
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Acute appendicitis in patients above and below 60 years of age. Incidence rate and clinical course.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature40202
Source
Acta Chir Scand. 1983;149(2):165-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
1983
Author
C I Rydén
T. Grunditz
L. Janzon
Source
Acta Chir Scand. 1983;149(2):165-70
Date
1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Appendectomy - adverse effects
Appendicitis - diagnosis - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Fever - etiology
Humans
Infant
Length of Stay
Male
Middle Aged
Postoperative Complications - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Surgical Wound Infection - epidemiology
Sweden
Abstract
Malmö General Hospital is the single referral unit for 240000 people living in Malmö, Sweden. In order to assess the influence of age on annual risk and clinical course in acute appendicitis we reviewed hospital records of 673 randomly selected patients operated on 1972-1978. Annual incidence in 20-year-olds 4/1000 was four times higher than in the 59-70-year-olds. Perforation was more common in old than in young patients. Fifty-four percent of all cases above 60 were perforated. Patients older than 60 with perforation had the longest duration of symptoms. Age above 60 and perforation were both associated with an increased body temperature at arrival an increased risk of wound infection and other complications and a longer period of hospitalization.
PubMed ID
6880551 View in PubMed
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Adaptive behavior in stressful situations and stroke incidence in hypertensive men: results from prospective cohort study "men born in 1914" in Malmö, Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193833
Source
Stroke. 2001 Aug;32(8):1712-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2001
Author
L. André-Petersson
G. Engström
B. Hagberg
L. Janzon
G. Steen
Author Affiliation
Division of Epidemiology, Department of Community Medicine, Malmö University Hospital, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden. Lena.Andre-Petersson@psychology.lu.ses
Source
Stroke. 2001 Aug;32(8):1712-20
Date
Aug-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological - classification
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Disease-Free Survival
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology
Incidence
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Neuropsychological Tests
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology - psychology
Stroke - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Although hypertension is a major risk factor for stroke, many hypertensive persons remain healthy. The aim of the present study was to analyze whether adaptation in a stressful situation was associated with the incidence of stroke in hypertensive men.
Two hundred thirty-eight hypertensive men were followed from baseline in 1982/1983 until first stroke, death, or December 31, 1996. Adaptation to stress was studied with the serial Color-Word Test. In the Regression dimension, 4 patterns of adaptation could be distinguished according to mastering of the test. Successful mastering of the test was shown in stabilized patterns, increasing difficulty in cumulative patterns, fluctuating difficulty in dissociative patterns, and fluctuating difficulty that increased during testing in cumulative-dissociative patterns. The patterns were compared regarding stroke incidence.
Forty-three men experienced a stroke during follow-up. Stroke rates per 1000 person-years were 12.6 for men with stabilized patterns, 14.3 for men with cumulative patterns, 16.2 for men with dissociative patterns, and 31.2 for men with cumulative-dissociative patterns. Multivariate analysis, adjusted for relevant cerebrovascular risk factors, showed that the cumulative-dissociative pattern of the Regression dimension was associated with an increased risk of stroke during follow-up (relative risk 3.00, 95% CI 1.32 to 6.81).
The specific behavior pattern, characterized by the greatest difficulties in managing the test, was associated with incidence of stroke in hypertensive men. One interpretation is that hypertensive men who chronically fail to find successful strategies in stressful situations are vulnerable to the damaging effects of stress and thereby at an increased risk of a future stroke.
PubMed ID
11486095 View in PubMed
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Alcohol consumption modifies the total lung capacity in smokers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11300
Source
Respiration. 1996;63(2):66-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
K. Ström
L. Janzon
B S Hanson
B. Hedblad
H E Rosberg
M. Arborelius
Author Affiliation
Department of Lung Medicine, Central Hospital Karlskrona, Sweden.
Source
Respiration. 1996;63(2):66-72
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Airway Obstruction - epidemiology
Alcohol Drinking
Energy intake
Humans
Male
Nutrition
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiratory Function Tests
Smoking
Total lung capacity
Abstract
Smoking-related airflow obstruction can develop with or without emphysema. Moderate alcohol consumption has been suggested to diminish the risk of centrilobular emphysema caused by smoking. Our aim was to study the influence of total energy and nutrient (protein, fat, carbohydrate and alcohol) intake on smoking-related emphysema. Lung function and nutrient intake including alcohol consumption were recorded at age of 68 years in 478 men as part of the population study 'Men Born in 1914' in Malmö, Sweden. In nonsmokers (n = 88) and ex-smokers (n = 223), there were no significant relationships between energy and nutrient intake and lung function. In smokers (n = 167), men in the highest and lowest quintile of total lung capacity (TLC) differed in alcohol intake (p = 0.004) but not in intake of total energy or other nutrients. In smokers with a forced expiratory volume in 1 s/vital capacity ratio of below 70% (n = 81), alcohol intake was positively correlated with TLC (r = 0.31; p = 0.006) after adjustment for smoking and body mass index. We conclude that in men with smoking-related airway obstruction, emphysema defined as large TLC was associated with high alcohol consumption but not with the intake of total energy or other nutrients.
PubMed ID
8966368 View in PubMed
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Area social characteristics and carotid atherosclerosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166391
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2007 Aug;17(4):333-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2007
Author
M. Rosvall
G. Engström
B. Hedblad
L. Janzon
G. Berglund
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Malmö University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden. maria.rosvall@med.lu.se
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2007 Aug;17(4):333-9
Date
Aug-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cardiovascular diseases
Carotid Artery Diseases - epidemiology - physiopathology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To explore the effect of social characteristics of residential areas on carotid atherosclerosis prevalence.
The associations among area social characteristics and B-mode ultrasound determined carotid plaque-score (a semi-quantitative scale measuring the degree of atherosclerosis in the carotid bifurcation area) were cross-sectionally investigated in a general population sample of 4033 men and women. Area socioeconomic circumstances were described through a social deprivation index calculated from migration rate, percentage residents with foreign citizenship among those with foreign background, dependency on social welfare support, and employment rate. Living in socially deprived areas was associated with an increased carotid plaque-score in both men (P for trend = 0.004) and women (P for trend = 0.007). These associations were only slightly reduced after adjustment for individual level indicators with a decrease of the absolute mean difference in carotid plaque-score between worse-off and better-off areas of 9% for men and 13% for women, whereas adjustment for risk factors turned the trend non-significant in women, however, not in men.
Those living in socially deprived areas in general had more extensive carotid atherosclerosis. However, in these areas there were a substantial number of individuals with low degrees of carotid atherosclerosis and vice versa. Thus, with regard to conceptual ideas of causal inference, the social characteristics of an area seem to be associated with the prevalence of carotid atherosclerosis. However, with regard to benefits of prevention, focusing on geographical areas would probably give a restricted benefit, where only some high-risk individuals would be reached.
PubMed ID
17121741 View in PubMed
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Are in-hospital deaths and long stay markers for errors in surgery?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature37909
Source
Qual Assur Health Care. 1990;2(2):149-59
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
T. Troëng
L. Janzon
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Central Hospital, Karlskrona, Sweden.
Source
Qual Assur Health Care. 1990;2(2):149-59
Date
1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Diagnostic Errors
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Intraoperative Complications
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Surgery Department, Hospital - standards
Surgical Procedures, Operative - mortality
Surgical Wound Infection - mortality
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To test the feasibility of using a system for classification of surgical errors and of in-hospital deaths and long hospital stay as markers for errors in surgery we reviewed the hospital records of 273 patients with 285 admissions. During the one year study period there were in all 3767 patients admitted for surgical care. From these we selected the 131 who died in the department during the year, the 100 who had the longest stay (greater than 33 days) and the 91 patients were referred to the departments of internal medicine, infectious diseases or orthopedic surgery. Errors were classified as error of omission or commission, in diagnosis or in therapy. Possible or definitive errors were found in the care of 23% of the patients who died and in 10% of the ones with a long hospital stay. Only 3% of patients referred to other departments experienced errors. It is concluded, that "in-hospital death and "long hospital stay" can be used as markers to identify errors in surgery.
PubMed ID
2103881 View in PubMed
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Asthma but not smoking-related airflow limitation is associated with a high fat diet in men: results from the population study "Men born in 1914", Malmö, Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11276
Source
Monaldi Arch Chest Dis. 1996 Feb;51(1):16-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1996
Author
K. Ström
L. Janzon
I. Mattisson
H E Rosberg
M. Arborelius
Author Affiliation
Dept of Lung Medicine, Central Hospital Karlskrona, Sweden.
Source
Monaldi Arch Chest Dis. 1996 Feb;51(1):16-21
Date
Feb-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Asthma - epidemiology - etiology
Confidence Intervals
Data Collection
Dietary Fats - adverse effects
Humans
Incidence
Logistic Models
Male
Prospective Studies
Pulmonary Ventilation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiratory Function Tests
Risk factors
Sampling Studies
Smoking - adverse effects
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to investigate whether there is an association between asthma and the intake of food with pro-oxidant or antioxidant activity (fat, alcohol, iron, zinc, and vitamins A and C), and to analyse whether any such association is specific to asthma or is found in airflow limitation in general. This study deals with 478 men, who were randomly selected from all the men born in Malmö in 1914. They were investigated using spirometry and their medical, occupational and dietary history was recorded in 1982-1983, at the age of 68 yrs, as part of the cohort study "Men born in 1914". Asthma was defined as a past or present physician's or nurse's diagnosis of asthma and airflow limitation was defined as a forced expiratory volume in one second/vital capacity ratio (FEV1/VC) of less than 70%. The relative risk of having asthma or airflow limitation as related to dietary intake at the age of 68 yrs was analysed after adjustments for smoking history and body mass index. Asthma was reported in 21 men and was not related to smoking history. Asthma was more common in men with a high fat intake (relative risk of asthma 1.74 for a 10% increase in fat intake, 95% confidence interval for the relative risk 1.13-2.68). The consumption of alcohol was higher for current smokers than ex-smokers and nonsmokers, and the intake of carbohydrates, vitamin C and iron was lower. Airflow limitation without asthma was present in 156 men and was related to smoking but not to dietary intake. Men with asthma had a significantly higher intake of fat than men without asthma. This difference appeared to be specific to asthma and was not found in airflow limitation in general.
PubMed ID
8901315 View in PubMed
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Asymptomatic leg and carotid atherosclerosis in smokers is related to degree of ventilatory capacity: longitudinal and cross-sectional results from 'Men born in 1914', Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10282
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2001 Mar;155(1):237-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2001
Author
G. Engström
B. Hedblad
S. Valind
L. Janzon
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, Malmö University Hospital, S-20502, Malmö, Sweden. gunnar.esgstrom@smi.mas.lu.se
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2001 Mar;155(1):237-43
Date
Mar-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Arteriosclerosis - physiopathology
Blood pressure
Carotid Artery Diseases - physiopathology
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Forced expiratory volume
Humans
Leg - blood supply
Lipids - blood
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio
Respiratory Mechanics
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Sweden
Vital Capacity
Abstract
Although smoking is associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD), many individuals remain healthy after many years of smoking. The population based cohort 'Men born in 1914' was used to investigate whether the occurrence of non-invasively detected atherosclerosis among smokers is associated with lung function [(i.e. height-adjusted forced expiratory volume during 1 s (FEV1.0) and vital capacity (VC)]. Two hundred and seven smokers without history of CVD were examined with spirometry and calf plethysmography at 55 years, and with spirometry, ankle-arm blood pressure recordings and ultrasound examinations of the carotid arteries at 68 years. Eighty-three men had atherosclerosis defined as carotid stenosis >30% or ankle-arm index
PubMed ID
11223447 View in PubMed
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Asymptomatic leg atherosclerosis is reduced by regular physical activity. Longitudinal results from the cohort "men born in 1914".

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49883
Source
Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg. 2001 Jun;21(6):502-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2001
Author
G. Engström
M. Ogren
B. Hedblad
P. Wollmer
L. Janzon
Author Affiliation
Division of Epidemiology, Department of Community Medicine, Malmö University Hospital, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg. 2001 Jun;21(6):502-7
Date
Jun-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Arteriosclerosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Cross-Sectional Studies
Exercise
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Leg - blood supply
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To study whether physical activity is associated with reduced occurrence of asymptomatic leg atherosclerosis. DESIGN: Longitudinal and cross-sectional analyses of the population-based cohort "men born in 1914". METHODS: Comparison of the systolic ankle/arm pressure index (AAI) at age 68 in groups who were sedentary, performed some activity, and performed regular physical training at 55 and 68 years of age. RESULTS: At 55 years of age, 100 (27%) were sedentary, 209 (58%) reported some physical activity and 54 (15%) reported regular physical training. At 68 years, 194 men (53%) reported the same degree of physical activity, 127 (35%) reported a higher physical activity, and 42 (12%) reported lower physical activity. Physical activity at 55 years (p =0.03) and increased physical activity between 55 and 68 years (p =0.03) were both associated with higher AAI at 68 after adjusting for potential confounders. At 68 years, AAI was 0.89+/-0.21, 1.01+/-0.13 and 1.05+/-0.11, respectively, in men who were sedentary, reported some physical activity, and regular physical training (p =0.0002). This association remained significant after adjustments for potential confounders. CONCLUSIONS: regular physical activity is associated with reduced occurrence of asymptomatic leg atherosclerosis, even in men taking up exercise after age of 55.
PubMed ID
11397023 View in PubMed
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Biased risk factor assessment in prospective studies of peripheral arterial disease due to change in exposure and selective mortality of high-risk individuals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67642
Source
J Cardiovasc Risk. 1996 Dec;3(6):523-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1996
Author
M. Ogren
B. Hedblad
L. Janzon
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, Lund University, Malmö University Hospital, Sweden.
Source
J Cardiovasc Risk. 1996 Dec;3(6):523-8
Date
Dec-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Arteries
Bias (epidemiology)
Humans
Hypercholesterolemia - complications
Hypertension - complications
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Peripheral Vascular Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Our aim was to assess whether risk factor assessment in prospective studies of peripheral disease (PAD) might be biased by change in exposure and selective mortality of individuals at high risk. METHODS: The cohort 'Men born in 1914' has been followed since the baseline examination 1969. PAD, (i.e. ankle-brachial pressure index
PubMed ID
9100088 View in PubMed
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125 records – page 1 of 13.