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17 records – page 1 of 2.

[Angina pectoris is an expensive national disease. It requires a reasonable distribution of responsibility between outpatient and inpatient care]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54389
Source
Lakartidningen. 1998 May 20;95(21):2430-2, 2435-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-20-1998

Association of outpatient utilisation of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and hospitalised heart failure in the entire Swedish population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52370
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2001 Apr;57(1):71-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2001
Author
J. Merlo
K. Broms
U. Lindblad
A. Björck-Linné
H. Liedholm
P O Ostergren
L. Erhardt
L. Råstam
A. Melander
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, Lund University, Malmö University Hospital, 205 02 Malmö, Sweden. Juan.Merlo@smi.mas.lu.se
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2001 Apr;57(1):71-5
Date
Apr-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal - adverse effects
Female
Heart Failure, Congestive - chemically induced - epidemiology
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Outpatients - statistics & numerical data
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Statistics, nonparametric
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Individual-based studies on restricted geographical settings have suggested that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may precipitate congestive heart failure. As NSAID use is very extensive, it might increase the occurrence of symptomatic heart failure in the general population. Therefore, in order to study the impact of NSAID utilisation (prescribed and over the counter) on hospitalised heart failure in an entire country (Sweden), we performed an ecological analysis, a design appropriate for studying large geographical areas. METHODS: We employed weighted (population size) ecological linear regression to study the association between outpatient utilisation of NSAIDs during 1989-1993 and hospitalised heart failure in 1993 in 283 of Sweden's 288 municipalities. Data were adjusted for age and gender proportions, socio-economic factors, latitude and utilisation of cardiovascular drugs, aspirin, low-dose aspirin and paracetamol. RESULTS: The unadjusted relative risk of hospitalised heart failure for each increase of one standard deviation of NSAID utilisation (5.8 defined daily doses/1000 inhabitants/day) was 1.23 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.18, 1.27]. After adjustments, the relative risk was 1.08 (95% CI 1.04, 1.12); the corresponding values if aspirin (non-low-dose) was included as an NSAID were 1.26 (95% CI 1.23, 1.28) and 1.07 (95% CI 1.04, 1.10). There was no such adjusted association with the utilisation of paracetamol-0.95 (95% CI 0.92, 0.98). CONCLUSION: The NSAID--heart failure association already established by individual-based studies on restricted geographical settings was corroborated in the present ecological study based on the whole population of an entire country (Sweden). Efforts should be made to promote a rational use of NSAIDs in the general population.
PubMed ID
11372596 View in PubMed
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Continuous vectorcardiographic changes in relation to scintigraphic signs of reperfusion in patients with acute myocardial infarction receiving thrombolytic therapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54715
Source
J Intern Med. 1996 Jan;239(1):35-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1996
Author
P. Juhlin
P A Boström
O. Hansen
H. Diemer
M. Freitag
B. Lilja
L. Erhardt
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Malmö University Hospital, Lund University, Sweden.
Source
J Intern Med. 1996 Jan;239(1):35-41
Date
Jan-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - physiopathology - radionuclide imaging - therapy
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Technetium Tc 99m Sestamibi - diagnostic use
Thrombolytic Therapy
Time Factors
Tomography, Emission-Computed, Single-Photon - methods
Vectorcardiography
Abstract
OBJECTIVES. Changes in the electrical activity of the heart reflecting the infarct process can be recorded by continuous vector-ECG, a method which is now clinically available for cardiac supervision. Shifts of the ST-segment and QRS-vector reflect ischaemia and necrosis of the myocardium. Continuous vector-ECG changes were evaluated against myocardial scintigraphy in 18 patients with acute myocardial infarction treated with streptokinase in order to study the impact of improved myocardial perfusion. DESIGN. Myocardial perfusion was analysed with 99Tcm-Sestamibi (Cardiolite, DuPont Scandinavia AB, Kista, Sweden) single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT). Registrations were performed before and after thrombolysis in order to estimate the amount of myocardium with impaired perfusion initially (threatened myocardium) and the degree of perfusion improvement in this myocardial area. X, Y, Z vectors were registered continuously by Frank leads (Ortivus Medical, Täby, Sweden). QRS-vector difference, and the time to plateau phase and the ST-vector magnitude were used as a measurement of ischaemia and size of the myocardial infarction. RESULTS. In seven out of 11 patients treated within 3 h of onset of symptoms, an improvement in myocardial perfusion in the initially hypoperfused areas was achieved in contrast to none of the seven patients treated > 3 h after onset of pain (P
PubMed ID
8551198 View in PubMed
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Cost effectiveness in the treatment of heart failure with ramipril. A Swedish substudy of the AIRE study. Acute Infarction Ramipril Efficacy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54489
Source
Pharmacoeconomics. 1997 Aug;12(2 Pt 2):256-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1997
Author
L. Erhardt
S. Ball
F. Andersson
P. Bergentoft
C. Martinez
Author Affiliation
Kardiologkliniken, MalmØ AllmØnna Sjukhus, MalmØ, Sweden.
Source
Pharmacoeconomics. 1997 Aug;12(2 Pt 2):256-66
Date
Aug-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors - economics - therapeutic use
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Heart Failure, Congestive - drug therapy - economics
Humans
Ramipril - economics - therapeutic use
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
We estimated the cost effectiveness of adding the ACE inhibitor ramipril to conventional treatment in patients with heart failure after acute myocardial infarction. These estimates were based on the Acute Infarction Ramipril Efficacy (AIRE) study and on complementary Swedish healthcare resource use data for a subset of patients. The average follow-up period was 15 months (minimum 6 months, maximum 3.8 years). The perspective of the analysis was that of the county councils (third-party payers), and we focused on the cost of drugs and hospitalisation. The marginal cost effectiveness of the treatment was estimated over 3 treatment periods: 1, 2 and 3.8 years. The cost-effectiveness ratios varied between SEK14,148 and SEK33,033 per life-year gained ($US1 = SEK7.70. Pounds 1 = SEK12.40) for the 3 treatment periods. Adding ramipril to conventional treatment for heart failure after acute myocardial infarction is therefore cost effective, and compares favourably with the cost effectiveness of other common medical therapies in the cardiovascular field.
Notes
Erratum In: Pharmacoeconomics 1997 Dec;12(6):706
PubMed ID
10170450 View in PubMed
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Differences in quality of life in men and women with ischemic heart disease. A prospective controlled study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46259
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 1999;33(3):160-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999
Author
L. Westin
R. Carlsson
L. Erhardt
E. Cantor-Graae
T. McNeil
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 1999;33(3):160-5
Date
1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Angioplasty, Transluminal, Percutaneous Coronary
Case-Control Studies
Chest Pain - etiology
Coronary Artery Bypass
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Marriage
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - psychology - therapy
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Time Factors
Abstract
A study was conducted in Sweden in 1989-1992 to evaluate differences in quality of life (QL) in consecutive male and female patients after acute myocardial infarction (AMI), coronary artery by-pass grafting (CABG) and percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA). Somatic and psychological dimensions of QL were assessed by self-administered questionnaire in patients one month (n = 376) and one year (n = 349) after the cardiac event. Normal controls (n = 88) were used for comparison. Differences between gender groups, as well as between study patients and controls in somatic and psychological dimensions of QL were studied. Patients were shown to experience poorer QL when compared with demographically similar controls, especially at the one-month assessment. Female patients had poorer QL after one month (in general health, feeling of arrythmia, anxiety, depression, self-esteem, experience of sex life) and after one year (general health, anxiety, depression) compared with male patients. In all dimensions of QL a proportion of patients (19-45%) experienced a decrease in QL from the one-month to the one-year assessment occasion. Healthcare workers concerned with secondary prevention must be aware that QL differs between male and female patients in several dimensions after a cardiac event. These findings should be taken into account in the clinical management of patients, particularly for female patients who may need special attention.
PubMed ID
10399804 View in PubMed
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Factors associated with development of stroke long-term after myocardial infarction: experiences from the LoWASA trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47125
Source
J Intern Med. 2005 Feb;257(2):201-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2005
Author
J. Herlitz
J. Holm
M. Peterson
B W Karlson
M Haglid Evander
L. Erhardt
Author Affiliation
Division of Cardiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden. johan.herlitz@hik.gu.se
Source
J Intern Med. 2005 Feb;257(2):201-7
Date
Feb-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal - therapeutic use
Anticoagulants - therapeutic use
Aspirin - therapeutic use
Cerebrovascular Accident - etiology - prevention & control
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypertension - complications
Male
Myocardial Infarction - complications - drug therapy
Proportional Hazards Models
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Time Factors
Warfarin - therapeutic use
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To describe factors associated with the development of stroke during long-term follow-up after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in the LoWASA trial. PATIENTS: Patients who had been hospitalized for AMI were randomized within 42 days to receive either warfarin 1.25 mg plus aspirin 75 mg daily or aspirin 75 mg alone. DESIGN: The study was performed according to the probe design, that is open treatment and blinded end-point evaluation. SETTING: The study was performed in 31 hospitals in Sweden. The mean follow-up time was 5.0 years with a range of 1.7-6.7 years. RESULTS: In all, 3300 patients were randomized in the trial, of which 194 (5.9%) developed stroke (4.2% nonhaemorrhagic, 0.5% haemorrhagic and 1.3% uncertain. The following factors appeared as independent predictors for an increased risk of stroke: age, hazard ratio and 95% confidence interval (1.07; 1.05-1.08), a history of diabetes mellitus (2.4; 1.8-3.4), a history of stroke (2.3; 1.5-3.5), a history of hypertension (2.0; 1.5-2.7) and a history of smoking (1.5;1.1-2.0). Most of these factors were also predictors of a nonhaemorrhagic stroke whereas no predictor of haemorrhagic stroke was found. CONCLUSION: Risk indicators for stroke long-term after AMI were increasing age, a history of either diabetes mellitus, stroke, hypertension or smoking.
PubMed ID
15656879 View in PubMed
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["HjÀrtsvikt" ("heart swing")--a mined field or virgin soil?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54770
Source
Lakartidningen. 1995 May 24;92(21):2173-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-24-1995

Myocardial reperfusion in thrombolysis A 99Tcm-Sestamibi SPECT study in patients with acute myocardial infarction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55078
Source
Clin Physiol. 1992 Nov;12(6):679-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1992
Author
P A Boström
H. Diemer
M. Freitag
P. Juhlin
B. Lilja
L. Erhardt
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Lund University, Malmö General Hosital, Sweden.
Source
Clin Physiol. 1992 Nov;12(6):679-84
Date
Nov-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Female
Heart - radionuclide imaging
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - drug therapy - radionuclide imaging
Myocardial Reperfusion
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Technetium Tc 99m Sestamibi - diagnostic use
Thrombolytic Therapy
Tomography, Emission-Computed, Single-Photon
Abstract
This study presents the outcome of myocardial scintigraphy performed before and after thrombolytic treatment in 16 patients with acute myocardial infarction using 99Tcm-Sestamibi (Cardiolite, Du Pont Scandinavia AB, Kista, Sweden). The patients were given 99Tcm-Sestamibi intravenously as soon as possible after the decision to give thrombolytic treatment. When the patients were in a clinically stable state after the thrombolytic treatment, myocardial perfusion was analysed with the gamma camera using single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT). A second 99Tcm-Sestamibi tomography was carried out on the second to fourth day after the myocardial infarction. Data reconstruction was done with the 'Bull's eye technique'. Nine patients received thrombolysis 10% after treatment, while all seven patients who received treatment > or = 3 h after the onset of pain improved their myocardial perfusion by
PubMed ID
1424485 View in PubMed
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Patients with ischemic heart disease: quality of life predicts long-term mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53121
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2005 Apr;39(1-2):50-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2005
Author
L. Westin
T. Nilstun
R. Carlsson
L. Erhardt
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Ethics, University of Lund, Sweden.
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2005 Apr;39(1-2):50-4
Date
Apr-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Aged
Angioplasty, Transluminal, Percutaneous Coronary - statistics & numerical data
Cause of Death
Comparative Study
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Artery Bypass - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - mortality - radiography - therapy
Myocardial Ischemia - mortality - radiography - therapy
Predictive value of tests
Prognosis
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Severity of Illness Index
Sickness Impact Profile
Statistics, nonparametric
Survival Analysis
Sweden
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: We have investigated whether perceived quality of life has an impact on long-term survival after a cardiac event. DESIGN: Male (n = 316) and female (n = 97) patients were assessed by means of a self-administered quality of life questionnaire 1 year after either acute myocardial infarction (n = 296), coronary artery bypass grafting surgery (n = 99) or percutaneous coronary intervention (n = 18). Inclusion period was 1989-1991. Ten years after the last patient answered the 1-year questionnaire, mortality (status factor) up to census date was analysed using nine dimensions of quality of life as covariates (Cox regression). RESULTS: At 1-year assessment, subjective general health (RR = 3.15), perceived arrhythmia (RR = 1.72), experience of sex life (RR = 1.55), perceived breathlessness (RR = 1.50) and experience of self-esteem (RR = 1.48) were all significantly related to death within the period up to census date. CONCLUSION: The findings highlight that the patients' own experience of his or her quality of life, has a prognostic importance for long-term mortality after a cardiac event. Clinicians should be aware that a careful monitoring of perceived quality of life is an important part of good patient care.
PubMed ID
16097414 View in PubMed
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17 records – page 1 of 2.