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41 records – page 1 of 5.

[Admission and discharge at a department of internal medicine in greater Stockholm].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature251225
Source
Lakartidningen. 1976 Mar 24;73(13):1207-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-24-1976

[Adverse effects after use of oral contraceptives. A comparison of 1966-70 and 1974-78]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature40999
Source
Lakartidningen. 1980 Jun 11;77(24):2249-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-11-1980
Author
G. Boman
L E Böttiger
B. Westerholm
Source
Lakartidningen. 1980 Jun 11;77(24):2249-52
Date
Jun-11-1980
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Child
Comparative Study
Contraceptives, Oral - adverse effects
English Abstract
Estradiol Congeners - administration & dosage
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Sweden
Thromboembolism - chemically induced - epidemiology
Abstract
Contraceptive preparations with a high content of estrogen (75 mcg or more) were prohibited in Sweden in 1974 whereupon the number of reported side effects of the pill markedly declined, both relatively and absolutely. The investigation, which compares the side effects reported during the period 1966-70 when the high dose preparation was on sale and 1974-78 after its prohibition. The decrease in the estrogen content took effect at that time. The risks remain, especially an excess morbidity from thromboembolism among women who use pills. While the risk increases with advancing age, the role played by the pill in the genesis of arterial complications is nonetheless slight. The risk of cardiac infarct among pill users who also smoke is not assessed in this material.
PubMed ID
7401778 View in PubMed
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[Adverse effects of drugs in Sweden (I). Adverse effects with fatal outcome 1971-1975].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature250055
Source
Lakartidningen. 1977 Mar 23;74(12):1182-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-23-1977

Adverse reactions to nitrofurantoin. Analysis of 921 reports.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature245300
Source
Am J Med. 1980 Nov;69(5):733-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1980
Author
L. Holmberg
G. Boman
L E Böttiger
B. Eriksson
R. Spross
A. Wessling
Source
Am J Med. 1980 Nov;69(5):733-8
Date
Nov-1980
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Age Factors
Aged
Chronic Disease
Drug Hypersensitivity - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Liver Cirrhosis - chemically induced - epidemiology
Male
Nitrofurantoin - adverse effects
Pancytopenia - chemically induced - epidemiology
Polyneuropathies - chemically induced - epidemiology
Pulmonary Fibrosis - chemically induced - epidemiology
Sex ratio
Sweden
Abstract
Reports on adverse reactions to nitrofurantoin today are common in Sweden and constitute 10 to 12 percent of all incoming reports. We present an analysis of 921 reports of adverse reactions received by the Swedish Adverse Drug Reaction Committee during the period 1966--1976. The two largest groups consist of reports of acute pulmonary reactions (43 percent) and allergic reactions (42 percent). The remaining reports fall into any of four smaller groups, chronic pulmonary reactions, liver damage, blood dyscrasias or neuropathy. Acute pulmonary and acute allergic reactions in all aspects are very similar and carry the characteristics of an acute hypersensitivity reaction. The increasing number of reports--even in relation to sales figures--would be best explained by a continuous sensitization. Chronic pulmonary reactions (interstitial pneumonitis) afflict older patients, often after prolonged treatment with relatively small doses. We suggest that these reactions are elicited by a toxic mechanism. Seventy-one percent of all reactions were severe enough to cause the patient's hospitalization; only 1 percent was fatal. The risk of an adverse reaction varies with sex and age, increases with age and is higher in women than in men. The time has come for a re-evaluation of nitrofurantoin and its role in the treatment of urinary tract infections.
PubMed ID
7435512 View in PubMed
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The drug-consuming patient and his drugs. I. The patient.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12899
Source
Acta Med Scand. 1983;213(3):205-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1983
Author
L. Holmberg
L E Böttiger
Source
Acta Med Scand. 1983;213(3):205-9
Date
1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Age Factors
Aged
Alcohol Drinking
Body Weight
Creatinine - blood
Drug Therapy
Hospitalization
Humans
Male
Medication Errors
Middle Aged
Patients
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Smoking
Sweden
Abstract
Patient characteristics and pre-hospital drug consumption have been studied in 506 consecutive patients acutely admitted to a department of medicine. Women were older (median 69 years) than men (median 63 years) and weighed less (mean 60 vs. 74 kg). Serum creatinine values were above the normal limits in 110 patients (22%). Forty-eight per cent of men and 26% of women were smokers. Heavy alcohol intake was found in 12% of men and 4% of women. It is concluded that a typical patient group shows much greater variations in age, weight, renal function, smoking and drinking habits--factors all known to influence the results of drug treatment--than is generally taken into account when routine drugs are prescribed.
PubMed ID
6846064 View in PubMed
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41 records – page 1 of 5.