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Discriminative biogeochemical signatures of methanotrophs in different chemosynthetic habitats at an active mud volcano in the Canadian Beaufort Sea.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature307978
Source
Sci Rep. 2019 11 26; 9(1):17592
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
11-26-2019
Author
Dong-Hun Lee
Yung Mi Lee
Jung-Hyun Kim
Young Keun Jin
Charles Paull
Helge Niemann
Ji-Hoon Kim
Kyung-Hoon Shin
Author Affiliation
Hanyang University ERICA Campus, 15588, Ansan, South Korea.
Source
Sci Rep. 2019 11 26; 9(1):17592
Date
11-26-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Several mud volcanoes are active in the Canadian Beaufort Sea. In this study, we investigated vertical variations in methanotrophic communities in sediments of the mud volcano MV420 (420?m water depth) by analyzing geochemical properties, microbial lipids, and nucleic acid signatures. Three push cores were collected with a remotely operated vehicle from visually discriminative habitats that were devoid of megafauna and/microbial mats (DM) to the naked eye, covered with bacterial mats (BM), or colonized by siboglinid tubeworms (ST). All MV420 sites showed the presence of aerobic methane oxidation (MOx)- and anaerobic methane oxidation (AOM)-related lipid biomarkers (4a-methyl sterols and sn-2-hydroxyarchaeol, respectively), which were distinctly different in comparison with a reference site at which these compounds were not detected. Lipid biomarker results were in close agreement with 16S rRNA analyses, which revealed the presence of MOx-related bacteria (Methylococcales) and AOM-related archaea (ANME-2 and ANME-3) at the MV420 sites. 4a-methyl sterols derived from Methylococcales predominated in the surface layer at the BM site, which showed a moderate methane flux (0.04?mmol?cm-2 y-1), while their occurrence was limited at the DM (0.06?mmol?cm-2 y-1) and ST (0.01?mmol?cm-2 y-1) sites. On the other hand, 13C-depleted sn-2-hydroxyarchaeol potentially derived from ANME-2 and/or ANME-3 was abundant in down-core sediments at the ST site. Our study indicates that a niche diversification within this mud volcano system has shaped distinct methanotrophic communities due to availability of electron acceptors in association with varying degrees of methane flux and bioirrigation activity.
PubMed ID
31772218 View in PubMed
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High abundance of protein-like fluorescence in the Amerasian Basin of Arctic Ocean: Potential implication of a fall phytoplankton bloom.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294223
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2017 Dec 01; 599-600:355-363
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-01-2017
Author
Meilian Chen
Seung-Il Nam
Ji-Hoon Kim
Young-Joo Kwon
Sungwook Hong
Jinyoung Jung
Kyung-Hoon Shin
Jin Hur
Author Affiliation
Department of Environment & Energy, Sejong University, Seoul 143-747, South Korea.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2017 Dec 01; 599-600:355-363
Date
Dec-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Eutrophication
Fluorescence
Oceans and Seas
Phytoplankton - growth & development
Seawater - chemistry
Abstract
The seawater samples from the Chukchi and East Siberian Seas were collected along a shelf-slope-basin gradient and analyzed for chromophoric and fluorescent DOM (i.e., CDOM and FDOM, respectively). Unexpected high protein-like FDOM (0.35±0.40 and 0.24±0.34 RU for peaks B and T, respectively) levels were identified, which corresponded to 1-2 orders of magnitude higher than those documented by previous reports. This unique phenomenon could be attributed to a fall phytoplankton bloom. The seawater chl-a data, estimated from in situ fluorescence measurements and satellite remote sensing data, showed the subsurface chl-a maximum of up to 1.52mgm-3 at ~25-70m depths and the surface monthly average values (August 2015) up to 0.55 to 0.71mgm-3, which fall in the range of ~0.5-2.0mgm-3 during fall phytoplankton blooms in this area. Meanwhile, the depth profile of DOM parameters revealed subsurface maxima of protein-like fluorescence peaks along the shelf-slope gradient. The positive correlations between the protein-like peaks and biological index implied the lateral transport of DOM and nutrients from the shelf to the slope and basin. Despite still being a largely ice-covered environment, potential shifts in the ecosystem appear to make progress in response to changing climate in the Arctic Ocean.
PubMed ID
28478365 View in PubMed
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High abundance of protein-like fluorescence in the Amerasian Basin of Arctic Ocean: Potential implication of a fall phytoplankton bloom.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282405
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2017 May 04;599-600:355-363
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-04-2017
Author
Meilian Chen
Seung-Il Nam
Ji-Hoon Kim
Young-Joo Kwon
Sungwook Hong
Jinyoung Jung
Kyung-Hoon Shin
Jin Hur
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2017 May 04;599-600:355-363
Date
May-04-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
The seawater samples from the Chukchi and East Siberian Seas were collected along a shelf-slope-basin gradient and analyzed for chromophoric and fluorescent DOM (i.e., CDOM and FDOM, respectively). Unexpected high protein-like FDOM (0.35?0.40 and 0.24?0.34 RU for peaks B and T, respectively) levels were identified, which corresponded to 1-2 orders of magnitude higher than those documented by previous reports. This unique phenomenon could be attributed to a fall phytoplankton bloom. The seawater chl-a data, estimated from in situ fluorescence measurements and satellite remote sensing data, showed the subsurface chl-a maximum of up to 1.52mgm(-3) at ~25-70m depths and the surface monthly average values (August 2015) up to 0.55 to 0.71mgm(-3), which fall in the range of ~0.5-2.0mgm(-3) during fall phytoplankton blooms in this area. Meanwhile, the depth profile of DOM parameters revealed subsurface maxima of protein-like fluorescence peaks along the shelf-slope gradient. The positive correlations between the protein-like peaks and biological index implied the lateral transport of DOM and nutrients from the shelf to the slope and basin. Despite still being a largely ice-covered environment, potential shifts in the ecosystem appear to make progress in response to changing climate in the Arctic Ocean.
PubMed ID
28478365 View in PubMed
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On the impact of wastewater effluent on phytoplankton in the Arctic coastal zone: A case study in the Kitikmeot Sea of the Canadian Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature303818
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2021 Apr 10; 764:143861
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-10-2021
Author
Dong-Young Back
Sun-Yong Ha
Brent Else
Mark Hanson
Samantha F Jones
Kyung-Hoon Shin
Agnieszka Tatarek
Józef M Wiktor
Nazim Cicek
Shah Alam
C J Mundy
Author Affiliation
Centre for Earth Observation Science, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB R3T 2N2, Canada. Electronic address: backd@myumanitoba.ca.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2021 Apr 10; 764:143861
Date
Apr-10-2021
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Canada
Diatoms
Phytoplankton
Waste Water
Abstract
We present a case study on the impact of effluent from a wastewater lagoon-wetland system on phytoplankton and local primary production near a coastal Arctic community (Cambridge Bay) over spring to fall 2018. Results are also placed within an interannual and regional context for the surrounding Kitikmeot Sea. We find the shallow, relatively fresh Kitikmeot Sea is one of the most nutrient-deplete regions of the Arctic Ocean with NO3- + NO2- concentrations below the surface mixed layer rarely exceeding 2 µmol L-1 and a N:Si:P ratio of 1:6:1. The fjordal-type bathymetry of the main study site and a persistent pycnocline below the bay's exit sill led to slightly elevated N:Si:P of 3:11:1 through trapping of wastewater-sourced N at depth via sinking and remineralization of primary production. Total production in Cambridge Bay over the 3-month open water period was 12.1 g C m-2 with 70% of this production occurring during the 1-month discharge of wastewater into the system. Local primary production responded rapidly to high NO3- + NO2-, NH4+ and PON concentrations provided by wastewater effluent, comprising up to 20% of the production during the discharge period. Remaining production was mostly explained by the deep nutrient pool in the bay, which was only accessed towards the end of the discharge period as the diatom-dominated deep chlorophyll maximum settled below the pycnocline. Although not yet eutrophic, caution is raised at the rapid response of the marine system to wastewater release with a strong recommendation to develop a research and monitoring plan for the bay.
PubMed ID
33383224 View in PubMed
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Synthesis of mycosporine-like amino acids by a size-fractionated marine phytoplankton community of the arctic beaufort sea.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295463
Source
J Photochem Photobiol B. 2018 Nov; 188:87-94
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-2018
Author
Sun-Yong Ha
Jun-Oh Min
HyoungMin Joo
Min-Seob Kim
Sung-Ho Kang
Kyung-Hoon Shin
Author Affiliation
Korea Polar Research Institute (KOPRI), Division of Polar Ocean Sciences, 26 Songdomirae-ro, Yeonsu-Gu, Incheon 21990, Republic of Korea.
Source
J Photochem Photobiol B. 2018 Nov; 188:87-94
Date
Nov-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Amino Acids - biosynthesis
Arctic Regions
Carbon - metabolism
Chlorophyll - analysis
Oceans and Seas
Phytoplankton - growth & development - metabolism
Abstract
During the RV-ARAON cruise, a comparative study on the biosynthesis of mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) was conducted for the size-fractionated phytoplankton of the Beaufort Sea (Arctic). The MAAs contents in the micro-phytoplankton community (>20?µm size) is considerably higher than that observed in the nano- (20-2?µm size) and pico-phytoplankton (
PubMed ID
30237008 View in PubMed
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Widespread Anthropogenic Nitrogen in Northwestern Pacific Ocean Sediment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282201
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2017 May 11;
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-11-2017
Author
Haryun Kim
Kitack Lee
Dhong-Il Lim
Seung-Il Nam
Tae-Wook Kim
Jin-Yu T Yang
Young Ho Ko
Kyung-Hoon Shin
Eunil Lee
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2017 May 11;
Date
May-11-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Sediment samples from the East China and Yellow seas collected adjacent to continental China were found to have lower d(15)N values (expressed as d(15)N = [(15)N:(14)Nsample/(15)N:(14)Nair - 1] × 1000‰; the sediment (15)N:(14)N ratio relative to the air nitrogen (15)N:(14)N ratio). In contrast, the Arctic sediments from the Chukchi Sea, the sampling region furthest from China, showed higher d(15)N values (2-3‰ higher than those representing the East China and the Yellow sea sediments). Across the sites sampled, the levels of sediment d(15)N increased with increasing distance from China, which is broadly consistent with the decreasing influence of anthropogenic nitrogen (N(ANTH)) resulting from fossil fuel combustion and fertilizer use. We concluded that, of several processes, the input of N(ANTH) appears to be emerging as a new driver of change in the sediment d(15)N value in marginal seas adjacent to China. The present results indicate that the effect of N(ANTH) has extended beyond the ocean water column into the deep sedimentary environment, presumably via biological assimilation of N(ANTH) followed by deposition. Further, the findings indicate that N(ANTH) is taking over from the conventional paradigm of nitrate flux from nitrate-rich deep water as the primary driver of biological export production in this region of the Pacific Ocean.
PubMed ID
28462990 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.