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Does the weather really matter? A cohort study of influences of weather and solar conditions on daily variations of joint pain in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature94385
Source
Arthritis Rheum. 2009 Sep 15;61(9):1243-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-15-2009
Author
Smedslund Geir
Mowinckel Petter
Heiberg Turid
Kvien Tore Kristian
Hagen Kåre Birger
Author Affiliation
National Resource Centre for Rehabilitation in Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, Norway. ges@nokc.no
Source
Arthritis Rheum. 2009 Sep 15;61(9):1243-7
Date
Sep-15-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To explore how reported joint pain in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) relates to weather and solar variables. METHODS: A prospective cohort study was conducted in Norway on 36 patients with stable RA. Daily reports of pain in the morning on a visual analog scale for 84 consecutive days were correlated (using time-series methodology) with records of atmospheric and solar variables for the same days. RESULTS: Pain was significantly associated with 3 or more external variables in 6 (17%) of the patients, with 1 or 2 external variables in 16 (44%) of the patients, and no associations were observed in 14 (39%) of the patients. The multivariate model explained between 19% and 64% of the variance in pain (R(2)) in the patients with associations to at least 3 weather/solar variables. The patients differed in the variables they responded to and in which direction, except for consistent negative associations between pain and ultraviolet light dose, and between pain and solar radio flux/sunspot count. The associations were mostly with same-day weather, but also lagged up to 3 days. We were not able to fit a statistically significant model at the group level. CONCLUSION: Weather sensitivity seems to be a continuum and a highly individual phenomenon in patients with RA. In the present sample, pain was significantly associated with 3 or more weather variables in 1 out of 6 patients, for whom the magnitude of weather sensitivity might significantly influence pain reporting in clinical care and research.
PubMed ID
19714599 View in PubMed
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Prevalence and burden of osteoarthritis: results from a population survey in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature85909
Source
J Rheumatol. 2008 Apr;35(4):677-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Grotle Margreth
Hagen Kaare Birger
Natvig Baard
Dahl Fredrik A
Kvien Tore Kristian
Author Affiliation
National Resource Centre for Rehabilitation in Rheumatology, Department of Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, Norway. margreth.grotle@medisin.uio.no
Source
J Rheumatol. 2008 Apr;35(4):677-84
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Disability Evaluation
Female
Hand Joints - physiopathology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Osteoarthritis, Hip - complications - epidemiology - physiopathology
Osteoarthritis, Knee - complications - epidemiology - physiopathology
Pain - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Population Surveillance
Prevalence
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the prevalence of osteoarthritis (OA) in knee, hip, and hand in a general population in Norway and the burden of disease in terms of associations between the report of OA and health-related variables. METHODS: In 2004, postal questionnaires were sent to all people in a local community born in 1928-30, 1938-40, 1948-50, 1958-60, 1968-70, and 1978-80. A total of 3266 (56.7%) responded. The prevalence of hip, knee, and/or hand OA was obtained by the item "Have you ever been diagnosed with osteoarthritis in hip/knee/hand by a medical doctor or by x-ray?". RESULTS: The overall prevalence of OA was 12.8% (95% CI 11.7-14.0), being significantly higher among women [14.7% (95% CI 13.1-16.4)] than men [10.5% (95% CI 9.0-12.1)]. The prevalence for hip OA was 5.5% (95% CI 4.7-6.3), knee OA 7.1% (95% CI 6.3-8.0), and for hand OA 4.3% (95% CI 3.6-5.0). OA was significantly (all p 1 year, pain in several body sites, sick leave for more than 8 weeks, emotional distress, poor sleeping quality, fatigue, and with frequent use of healthcare providers in primary health care. A significant (p = 0.001) dose-response relationship between increasing body mass index and OA was found. CONCLUSION: The overall prevalence of OA was 12.8% and higher prevalence was found among women and older people, people with less than 12 years of education, those out of work, and those overweight. OA was associated with pain, disability, and poor health status, and frequent use of healthcare providers.
PubMed ID
18278832 View in PubMed
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