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Accuracy of death certificates of cardiovascular disease in a community intervention in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107744
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2013 Dec;41(8):883-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
Anders Eriksson
Hans Stenlund
Kristin Ahlm
Kurt Boman
Lars Olov Bygren
Lars Age Johansson
Bert-Ove Olofsson
Stig Wall
Lars Weinehall
Author Affiliation
1Research Unit Skellefteå, Internal Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2013 Dec;41(8):883-9
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality - prevention & control
Cause of Death
Death Certificates
Female
Humans
Male
Medical Records
Middle Aged
Program Evaluation
Reproducibility of Results
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The aim was to investigate the possibility to evaluate the mortality pattern in a community intervention programme against cardiovascular disease by official death certificates.
For all deceased in the intervention area (Norsjö), the accuracy of the official death certificates were compared with matched controls in the rest of Västerbotten. The official causes of death were compared with new certificates, based on the last clinical record, issued by three of the authors, and coded by one of the authors, all four accordingly blinded.
The degree of agreement between the official underlying causes of death in "cardiovascular disease" (CVD) and the re-evaluated certificates was not found to differ between Norsjö and the rest of Västerbotten. The agreement was 87% and 88% at chapter level, respectively, but only 55% and 55% at 4-digit level, respectively. The reclassification resulted in a 1% decrease of "cardiovascular deaths" in both Norsjö and the rest of Västerbotten.
The disagreements in the reclassification of cause of death were equal but large in both directions. The official death certificates should be used with caution to evaluate CVD in small community intervention programmes, and restricted to the chapter level and total populations.
PubMed ID
23982462 View in PubMed
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Anaemia, but not iron deficiency, is associated with clinical symptoms and quality of life in patients with severe heart failure and palliative home care: A substudy of the PREFER trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294209
Source
Eur J Intern Med. 2017 Dec; 46:35-40
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2017
Author
Kurt Boman
Mona Olofsson
Ann-Charlotte R Bergman
Margareta Brännström
Author Affiliation
Research Unit, Department of Medicine, Skellefteå, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. Electronic address: kurt.boman@vll.se.
Source
Eur J Intern Med. 2017 Dec; 46:35-40
Date
Dec-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anemia - complications
Anxiety - epidemiology
Depression - epidemiology
Female
Heart Failure - mortality
Home Care Services
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Iron - deficiency
Linear Models
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Palliative Care
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
ROC Curve
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Severity of Illness Index
Sweden
Abstract
To explore the relationships between anaemia or iron deficiency (ID) and symptoms, quality of life (QoL), morbidity, and mortality.
A post-hoc, non-prespecified, explorative substudy of the prospective randomized PREFER trial. One centre study of outpatients with severe HF and palliative need managed with advanced home care. Associations between anaemia, ID, and the Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale (ESAS), Euro QoL (EQ-5D), Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questions (KCCQ) were examined only at baseline but at 6months for morbidity and mortality.
Seventy-two patients (51 males, 21 females), aged 79.2±9.1years. Thirty-nine patients (54%) had anaemia and 34 had ID (47%). Anaemia was correlated to depression (r=0.37; p=0.001), anxiety (r=0.25; p=0.04), and reduced well-being (r=0.26; p=0.03) in the ESAS; mobility (r=0.33; p=0.005), pain/discomfort (r=0.27; p=0.02), and visual analogue scale of health state (r=-0.28; p=0.02) in the EQ-5D; and physical limitation (r=-0.27; p=0.02), symptom stability; (r=-0.43; p
PubMed ID
28899603 View in PubMed
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Associations among 25-year trends in diet, cholesterol and BMI from 140,000 observations in men and women in Northern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123566
Source
Nutr J. 2012;11:40
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Ingegerd Johansson
Lena Maria Nilsson
Birgitta Stegmayr
Kurt Boman
Göran Hallmans
Anna Winkvist
Author Affiliation
Department of Odontology, Umeå University, 901 87, Umeå, Sweden. ingegerd.johansson@odont.umu.se
Source
Nutr J. 2012;11:40
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - trends
Body mass index
Cholesterol - blood
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet Surveys
Diet, Carbohydrate-Restricted - adverse effects
Diet, High-Fat - adverse effects
Diet, Reducing - adverse effects - trends
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health promotion
Humans
Male
Mass Media - trends
Middle Aged
Patient Compliance - ethnology
Sex Characteristics
Sweden
Weight Gain
Abstract
In the 1970s, men in northern Sweden had among the highest prevalences of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) worldwide. An intervention program combining population- and individual-oriented activities was initiated in 1985. Concurrently, collection of information on medical risk factors, lifestyle and anthropometry started. Today, these data make up one of the largest databases in the world on diet intake in a population-based sample, both in terms of sample size and follow-up period. The study examines trends in food and nutrient intake, serum cholesterol and body mass index (BMI) from 1986 to 2010 in northern Sweden.
Cross-sectional information on self-reported food and nutrient intake and measured body weight, height, and serum cholesterol were compiled for over 140,000 observations. Trends and trend breaks over the 25-year period were evaluated for energy-providing nutrients, foods contributing to fat intake, serum cholesterol and BMI.
Reported intake of fat exhibited two significant trend breaks in both sexes: a decrease between 1986 and 1992 and an increase from 2002 (women) or 2004 (men). A reverse trend was noted for carbohydrates, whereas protein intake remained unchanged during the 25-year period. Significant trend breaks in intake of foods contributing to total fat intake were seen. Reported intake of wine increased sharply for both sexes (more so for women) and export beer increased for men. BMI increased continuously for both sexes, whereas serum cholesterol levels decreased during 1986 - 2004, remained unchanged until 2007 and then began to rise. The increase in serum cholesterol coincided with the increase in fat intake, especially with intake of saturated fat and fats for spreading on bread and cooking.
Men and women in northern Sweden decreased their reported fat intake in the first 7 years (1986-1992) of an intervention program. After 2004 fat intake increased sharply for both genders, which coincided with introduction of a positive media support for low carbohydrate-high-fat (LCHF) diet. The decrease and following increase in cholesterol levels occurred simultaneously with the time trends in food selection, whereas a constant increase in BMI remained unaltered. These changes in risk factors may have important effects on primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD).
Notes
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PubMed ID
22686621 View in PubMed
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Atherosclerosis in early rheumatoid arthritis: very early endothelial activation and rapid progression of intima media thickness.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99230
Source
Arthritis Res Ther. 2010 Aug 16;12(4):R158
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-16-2010
Author
Anna Sodergren
Kjell Karp
Kurt Boman
Catharina Eriksson
Elisabeth Lundstrom
Torgny Smedby
Lisbet Soderlund
Solbritt Rantapaa-Dahlqvist
Solveig Wallberg-Jonsson
Source
Arthritis Res Ther. 2010 Aug 16;12(4):R158
Date
Aug-16-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: In this study we aimed to investigate whether there are indications of premature atherosclerosis, as measured by flow-mediated dilation (FMD) and intima media thickness (IMT), in patients with very early RA, and to analyze its relation to biomarkers of endothelial dysfunction, taking inflammation and traditional cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors into account. METHODS: Patients from the three northern counties of Sweden diagnosed with early RA are followed in an ongoing prospective study of CVD co-morbidity. Of these, all patients aged [less than or equal to]60 years were consecutively included in this survey of CVD risk factors (n=79). Forty-four age and sex matched controls were included. IMT of common carotid artery and FMD of brachial artery were measured using ultrasonography. Blood was drawn for analysis of lipids, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), tissue plasminogen activator (tPA)-mass, VonWillebrand factor (VWF), soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM), soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM), sE-selectin, sL-selectin and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1). In a subgroup of 27 RA patients and their controls the ultrasound measurements were reanalysed after 18 months. RESULTS: There were no significant differences between RA patients and controls in terms of IMT or FMD at the first evaluation. However after 18 months there was a significant increase in the IMT among the patients with RA (P
PubMed ID
20712865 View in PubMed
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Biomarkers of milk fat and the risk of myocardial infarction in men and women: a prospective, matched case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96924
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2010 Jul;92(1):194-202
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
Eva Warensjö
Jan-Håkan Jansson
Tommy Cederholm
Kurt Boman
Mats Eliasson
Göran Hallmans
Ingegerd Johansson
Per Sjögren
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. eva.warensjo@pubcare.uu.se
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2010 Jul;92(1):194-202
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Blood pressure
Cohort Studies
Dietary Fats - adverse effects
Educational Status
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Milk - adverse effects
Models, Statistical
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - physiopathology
Odds Ratio
Patient Selection
Phospholipids - blood - pharmacology
Questionnaires
Reference Values
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sex Characteristics
Smoking - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: High intakes of saturated fat have been associated with cardiovascular disease, and milk fat is rich in saturated fat. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to investigate the association between the serum milk fat biomarkers pentadecanoic acid (15:0), heptadecanoic acid (17:0), and their sum (15:0+17:0) and a first myocardial infarction (MI). DESIGN: The study design was a prospective case-control study nested within a large population-based cohort in Sweden. Included in the study were 444 cases (307 men) and 556 controls (308 men) matched on sex, age, date of examination, and geographic region. Clinical, anthropometric, biomarker fatty acid, physical activity, and dietary data were collected. The odds of a first MI were investigated by using conditional logistic regression. RESULTS: In women, proportions of milk fat biomarkers in plasma phospholipids were significantly higher (P
PubMed ID
20484449 View in PubMed
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Brain natriuretic peptide-guided treatment does not improve morbidity and mortality in extensively treated patients with chronic heart failure: responders to treatment have a significantly better outcome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133323
Source
Eur J Heart Fail. 2011 Oct;13(10):1096-103
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2011
Author
Patric Karlström
Urban Alehagen
Kurt Boman
Ulf Dahlström
Author Affiliation
Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden. patric.karlstrom@lj.se
Source
Eur J Heart Fail. 2011 Oct;13(10):1096-103
Date
Oct-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenergic beta-Antagonists - administration & dosage
Aged
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors - administration & dosage
Cardiovascular Agents - administration & dosage
Chronic Disease
Disease-Free Survival
Female
Heart Failure - blood - drug therapy - mortality
Hospitals
Humans
Male
Natriuretic Peptide, Brain - blood - drug effects
Norway
Severity of Illness Index
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To determine whether brain natriuretic peptide (BNP)-guided heart failure (HF) treatment improves morbidity and/or mortality when compared with conventional treatment.
UPSTEP was an investigator-initiated, randomized, parallel group, multicentre study with a PROBE design. Symptomatic patients with worsening HF, New York Heart Association class II-IV, ejection fraction 30% decrease in baseline BNP value) vs. non-responders found improved survival among responders (P
Notes
Comment In: Eur J Heart Fail. 2011 Oct;13(10):1046-821873341
Erratum In: Eur J Heart Fail. 2012 May;14(5):563von den Luederer Tomas [corrected to von Lueder, Thomas G]
PubMed ID
21715446 View in PubMed
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Changes in Dietary Fat Intake and Projections for Coronary Heart Disease Mortality in Sweden: A Simulation Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285263
Source
PLoS One. 2016;11(8):e0160474
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Lena Björck
Annika Rosengren
Anna Winkvist
Simon Capewell
Martin Adiels
Piotr Bandosz
Julia Critchley
Kurt Boman
Maria Guzman-Castillo
Martin O'Flaherty
Ingegerd Johansson
Source
PLoS One. 2016;11(8):e0160474
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cholesterol - blood
Coronary Disease - epidemiology - mortality - prevention & control
Dietary Fats - metabolism
Fatty Acids - metabolism
Feeding Behavior
Female
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Theoretical
Mortality - trends
Risk factors
Smoking
Sodium Chloride, Dietary - metabolism
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
In Sweden, previous favourable trends in blood cholesterol levels have recently levelled off or even increased in some age groups since 2003, potentially reflecting changing fashions and attitudes towards dietary saturated fatty acids (SFA). We aimed to examine the potential effect of different SFA intake on future coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality in 2025.
We compared the effect on future CHD mortality of two different scenarios for fat intake a) daily SFA intake decreasing to 10 energy percent (E%), and b) daily SFA intake rising to 20 E%. We assumed that there would be moderate improvements in smoking (5%), salt intake (1g/day) and physical inactivity (5% decrease) to continue recent, positive trends.
In the baseline scenario which assumed that recent mortality declines continue, approximately 5,975 CHD deaths might occur in year 2025. Anticipated improvements in smoking, dietary salt intake and physical activity, would result in some 380 (-6.4%) fewer deaths (235 in men and 145 in women). In combination with a mean SFA daily intake of 10 E%, a total of 810 (-14%) fewer deaths would occur in 2025 (535 in men and 275 in women). If the overall consumption of SFA rose to 20 E%, the expected mortality decline would be wiped out and approximately 20 (0.3%) additional deaths might occur.
CHD mortality may increase as a result of unfavourable trends in diets rich in saturated fats resulting in increases in blood cholesterol levels. These could cancel out the favourable trends in salt intake, smoking and physical activity.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27490257 View in PubMed
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A cost-effectiveness study of person-centered integrated heart failure and palliative home care: Based on a randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278465
Source
Palliat Med. 2016 Mar;30(3):296-302
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2016
Author
Klas-Göran Sahlen
Kurt Boman
Margareta Brännström
Source
Palliat Med. 2016 Mar;30(3):296-302
Date
Mar-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Delivery of Health Care, Integrated - economics - standards
Female
Health Care Costs
Heart Failure - therapy
Home Care Services - economics - organization & administration - standards
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Palliative Care - economics - organization & administration - standards
Person-Centered Therapy - economics - organization & administration - standards
Quality of Life
Quality-Adjusted Life Years
Sweden
Abstract
Previous economic studies of person-centered palliative home care have been conducted mainly among patients with cancer. Studies on cost-effectiveness of advanced home care for patients with severe heart failure are lacking when a diagnosis of heart failure is the only main disease as the inclusion criterion.
To assess the cost-effectiveness of a new concept of care called person-centered integrated heart failure and palliative home care.
A randomized controlled trial was conducted from January 2011 to 2013 at a center in Sweden. Data collection included cost estimates for health care and the patients' responses to the EQ-5D quality of life instrument.
Patients with chronic and severe heart failure were randomly assigned to an intervention (n?=?36) or control (n?=?36) group. The intervention group received the Palliative Advanced Home Care and Heart Failure Care intervention over 6?months. The control group received the same care that is usually provided by a primary health care center or heart failure clinic at the hospital.
EQ-5D data indicated that the intervention resulted in a gain of 0.25 quality-adjusted life years, and cost analysis showed a significant cost reduction with the Palliative Advanced Home Care and Heart Failure Care intervention. Even if costs for staffing are higher than usual care, this is more than made up for by the reduced need for hospital-based care. This intervention made it possible for the county council to use €50,000 for other needs.
The Palliative Advanced Home Care and Heart Failure Care working mode saves financial resources and should be regarded as very cost-effective.
PubMed ID
26603186 View in PubMed
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C-reactive protein is a determinant of first-ever stroke: prospective nested case-referent study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151353
Source
Cerebrovasc Dis. 2009;27(6):544-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Jonas Andersson
Lars Johansson
Per Ladenvall
Per-Gunnar Wiklund
Birgitta Stegmayr
Christina Jern
Kurt Boman
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine and Geriatrics, Skellefteå County Hospital, Skellefteå, Sweden. jonas.so.andersson@vll.se
Source
Cerebrovasc Dis. 2009;27(6):544-51
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
C-Reactive Protein - genetics - metabolism
Case-Control Studies
Cerebral Hemorrhage - blood - epidemiology - ethnology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Polymorphism, Genetic - genetics
Predictive value of tests
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Stroke - blood - epidemiology - ethnology
Sweden
Abstract
C-reactive protein (CRP) is a determinant of stroke, but there are no prospective studies on CRP and first ischemic stroke divided into etiologic subtypes. Our primary aim was to study CRP as a determinant of ischemic stroke, classified according to Trial of ORG 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment (TOAST) criteria, and intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) in a prospective study. A secondary aim was to study the relationship between the 1444C>T polymorphism, plasma levels of CRP and stroke.
The study was a prospective population-based case-referent study nested within the Northern Sweden Cohorts. We defined 308 cases of ischemic stroke and 61 ICH. Two controls for each case were defined from the same cohort.
The OR for the highest (>3 mg/l) versus lowest group (T polymorphism and any stroke subtype.
PubMed ID
19390179 View in PubMed
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Decreasing prevalence of abdominal aortic aneurysm and changes in cardiovascular risk factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282605
Source
J Vasc Surg. 2017 Mar;65(3):651-658
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2017
Author
Sven-Erik Persson
Kurt Boman
Anders Wanhainen
Bo Carlberg
Conny Arnerlöv
Source
J Vasc Surg. 2017 Mar;65(3):651-658
Date
Mar-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal - diagnostic imaging - epidemiology - prevention & control
Aortography - methods
Blood pressure
Computed Tomography Angiography
Female
Humans
Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Hyperlipidemias - blood - drug therapy - epidemiology
Hypertension - drug therapy - epidemiology - physiopathology
Lipids - blood
Male
Mass Screening - methods
Prevalence
Protective factors
Risk factors
Risk Reduction Behavior
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology - prevention & control
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Ultrasonography
Abstract
A significant reduction in the incidence of cardiovascular disease, including abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), has been observed in the past decades. In this study, a small but geographically well defined and carefully characterized population, previously screened for AAA and risk factors, was re-examined 11 years later. The aim was to study the reduction of AAA prevalence and associated factors.
All men and women aged 65 to 75 years living in the Norsjö municipality in northern Sweden in January 2010 were invited to an ultrasound examination of the abdominal aorta, registration of body parameters and cardiovascular risk factors, and blood sampling. An AAA was defined as an infrarenal aortic diameter =30 mm. Results were compared with a corresponding investigation conducted in 1999 in the same region.
A total of 602 subjects were invited, of whom 540 (90%) accepted. In 2010, the AAA prevalence was 5.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.8%-8.5%) among men compared with 16.9% (95% CI, 12.3%-21.6%) in 1999 (P 
PubMed ID
27793513 View in PubMed
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35 records – page 1 of 4.