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Accumulated neighbourhood deprivation and coronary heart disease: a nationwide cohort study from Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature308980
Source
BMJ Open. 2019 09 17; 9(9):e029248
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
09-17-2019
Author
Sara Larsson Lönn
Olle Melander
Casey Crump
Kristina Sundquist
Author Affiliation
Center for Primary Health Care Research, Department of Clinical Sciences, Malmö, Lund University, Lund, Sweden sara.larsson_lonn@med.lu.se.
Source
BMJ Open. 2019 09 17; 9(9):e029248
Date
09-17-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Coronary Disease - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Poverty Areas
Residence Characteristics
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Neighbourhood deprivation is a recognised predictor of coronary heart disease (CHD). The overall aim was to investigate if accumulated exposure to neighbourhood deprivation resulted in higher odds of CHD.
This is a longitudinal cohort study. Models based on repeated assessments of neighbourhood deprivation as well as single-point-in-time assessments were compared.
Sweden.
3?140?657 Swedish men and women without a history of CHD and who had neighbourhood deprivation exposure data over the past 15 years.
CHD within 5?years' follow-up.
The results suggested a gradient of stronger association with CHD risk by longer cumulative exposures to neighbourhood deprivation, particularly in the younger age cohorts. Neighbourhood deprivation was also highly correlated over time, especially in older age cohorts.
The effect of neighbourhood deprivation on CHD might depend on age. Accounting for individuals' baseline age may therefore be important for understanding neighbourhood environmental effects on the development of CHD over time. However, because of high correlation of neighbourhood deprivation over time, single-point-in-time assessments may be adequate for CHD risk prediction especially in older adults.
PubMed ID
31530598 View in PubMed
Less detail

Age- and Gender-Specific Familial Risks for Venous Thromboembolism: A Nationwide Epidemiological Study Based on Hospitalizations in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101278
Source
Circulation. 2011 Aug 8;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-8-2011
Author
Bengt Zöller
Xinjun Li
Jan Sundquist
Kristina Sundquist
Author Affiliation
Center for Primary Health Care Research, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
Source
Circulation. 2011 Aug 8;
Date
Aug-8-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Background- This nationwide study sought to determine age- and gender-specific familial risks in siblings hospitalized for venous thromboembolism (VTE). Methods and Results- The Swedish Multigeneration Register on 0- to 75-year-old subjects was linked to the Hospital Discharge Register for the years 1987-2007. Standardized incidence ratios were calculated for individuals whose siblings were hospitalized for VTE compared with those whose siblings were not affected. Among a total of 45 362 hospitalized cases with VTE, 2393 affected siblings were identified, with a familial standardized incidence ratio of 2.45 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.66 to 3.61). Gender-specific differences in incidence rates were observed. The familial risks were significantly increased from the age of 10 to 69 years, with a familial standardized incidence ratio of 4.77 (95% CI, 1.96 to 10.83) at ages 10 to 19 years, which decreased to 2.08 (95% CI, 1.35 to 3.20) at ages 60 to 69 years, although the absolute risk increased with age. The familial standardized incidence ratios for siblings with 2 and =3 affected probands were 51.87 (95% CI, 31.47 to 85.00) and 53.69 (95% CI, 25.59 to 108.50), respectively. Spouses had low familial risks (standardized incidence ratio=1.07; 95% CI, 1.04 to 1.10; observed spouse cases=3900). Conclusions- Familial factors, although influenced by age and gender, are important risk factors for VTE. The present study shows that VTE is aggregated in families and suggests that uncovering the sources of familial aggregation (genetic and nongenetic) may be worthwhile. Moreover, in a small fraction of siblings, the familial risk was very high, suggesting segregation of rare but strong genetic risk factors.
PubMed ID
21824919 View in PubMed
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Age-and sex-specific seasonal variation of venous thromboembolism in patients with and without family history: a nationwide family study in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107143
Source
Thromb Haemost. 2013 Dec;110(6):1164-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
Bengt Zöller
Xinjun Li
Henrik Ohlsson
Jan Sundquist
Kristina Sundquist
Author Affiliation
Dr. Bengt Zöller, Center for Primary Health Care Research, CRC, Building 28, Floor 11, Jan Waldenströms gata 35, Skåne University Hospital, S-205 02 Malmö, Sweden, Tel.: +46 70 6691476, Fax: +46 40 391370, E-mail: bengt.zoller@med.lu.se 
Source
Thromb Haemost. 2013 Dec;110(6):1164-71
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Disease Progression
Family
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Pedigree
Risk
Seasons
Sex Factors
Sweden
Venous Thromboembolism - epidemiology - genetics
Young Adult
Abstract
Seasonal variation in venous thromboembolism (VTE) risk in individuals with familial predisposition to VTE has not been explored. This nationwide study aimed to determine whether there are age- and sex-specific seasonal differences in risk of hospitalisation of VTE among individuals with and without a family history of VTE. The Swedish Multi-Generation Register was linked to Hospital Discharge Register data for the period 1964-2010. Seasonal variation in first VTE events in 1987-2010 for individuals with and without a family history of VTE (siblings or parents) was determined by several independent methods. Stratified analyses were performed according to age, sex, and VTE subtype (pulmonary embolism [PE] or deep venous thrombosis [DVT]). Seasonal variation in VTE incidence, mostly with a peak during the winter, was observed in both sexes in individuals with and without family history with overall peak-to-low ratios (PLRs) of 1.15 and 1.21, respectively. The peak day was December 25 and February 1 for those with and without a family history of VTE, respectively. Seasonal variation was strongest among individuals aged >50 years. Among individuals aged 0-25 years with a family history, the peak for VTE was in July (PLR = 1.20). Significant seasonal variation was observed for PE and DVT with the exception of DVT among those with a family history (PLR = 1.01). In conclusion, our data support the presence of a modest seasonal variation of VTE among individuals with and without a family history of VTE. However, young age and family history may modify and attenuate the effect of season on VTE.
PubMed ID
24048360 View in PubMed
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Age- and time-dependent changes in cancer incidence among immigrants to Sweden: colorectal, lung, breast and prostate cancers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129906
Source
Int J Cancer. 2012 Jul 15;131(2):E122-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-15-2012
Author
Seyed Mohsen Mousavi
Mahdi Fallah
Kristina Sundquist
Kari Hemminki
Author Affiliation
Division of Molecular Genetic Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center, DKFZ, Heidelberg, Germany. m.mousavi@dkfz.de
Source
Int J Cancer. 2012 Jul 15;131(2):E122-8
Date
Jul-15-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology
Colorectal Neoplasms - epidemiology
Emigration and Immigration
Female
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology
Male
Prostatic Neoplasms - epidemiology
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To examine the role of gender, age at immigration and length of stay on incidence trends of common cancers, we studied risk of colorectal, lung, breast and prostate cancers in immigrants to Sweden from 1958 to 2008. The nationwide Swedish Family-Cancer Database was used to calculate standardized incidence ratios for common cancers among immigrants compared to Swedes. Immigrants were classified into "high-risk" countries when their risk was increased, into "low-risk" when their risk was decreased and into "other" when their risk was nonsignificant. Among those who immigrated at younger age (
PubMed ID
22052616 View in PubMed
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Age-Dependent Metastatic Spread and Survival: Cancer of Unknown Primary as a Model.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279776
Source
Sci Rep. 2016 Mar 24;6:23725
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-24-2016
Author
Kari Hemminki
Nicholas Pavlidis
Konstantinos K Tsilidis
Kristina Sundquist
Jianguang Ji
Source
Sci Rep. 2016 Mar 24;6:23725
Date
Mar-24-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Metastasis
Neoplasms, Unknown Primary - epidemiology - mortality - pathology
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Survival Analysis
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
In order to describe a novel approach for the clinical study of metastases, we provide here age-specific incidence and survival data for cancer of unknown primary (CUP). Metastases in various organs are found at CUP diagnosis, which have implications for prognosis, and we hypothesize similar prognostic implications for metastases found at diagnosis of primary cancers. We identified 33,224 CUP patients from the Swedish Cancer Registry and calculated incidence rates (IRs) for CUP development. Cox proportional hazards regression models were performed to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) for relative survival in CUP patients compared to the general population. In age-group specific analyses, a maximal IR was reached at age 85-89 years, followed by a marked decline to age 90+ (7-fold in men and 3-fold in women). The overall HR for relative survival declined systematically by age. CUP may be applied as an epidemiological age-incidence model for cancer metastases providing evidence in line with autopsy data that the metastatic potential, as shown by the incidence of CUP, appears to weaken markedly at age 85 years, depending on metastatic locations. The relative death rates were highest among young patients, which was probably entirely due to the low death rates in young background population.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27009354 View in PubMed
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Age, period and cohort trends in drug abuse hospitalizations within the total Swedish population (1975-2010).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105832
Source
Drug Alcohol Depend. 2014 Jan 1;134:355-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1-2014
Author
Giuseppe N Giordano
Henrik Ohlsson
Kenneth S Kendler
Marilyn A Winkleby
Kristina Sundquist
Jan Sundquist
Author Affiliation
Center for Primary Health Care Research, Lund University, Jan Waldenströmsgata 35, CRC, building 28, floor 11, entrance 72, Malmö University Hospital, Malmö, S-205 02, Sweden. Electronic address: giuseppe_nicola.giordano@med.lu.se.
Source
Drug Alcohol Depend. 2014 Jan 1;134:355-61
Date
Jan-1-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Cohort Studies
Female
Hospitalization - trends
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance - methods
Substance-Related Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
The societal consequences of drug abuse (DA) are severe and well documented, the World Health Organization recommending tracking of population trends for effective policy responses in treatment of DA and delivery of health care services. However, to correctly identify possible sources of DA change, one must first disentangle three different time-related influences on the need for treatment due to DA: age effects, period effects and cohort effects.
We constructed our main Swedish national DA database (spanning four decades) by linking healthcare data from the Swedish Hospital Discharge Register to individuals, which included hospitalisations in Sweden for 1975-2010. All hospitalized DA cases were identified by ICD codes. Our Swedish national sample consisted of 3078,129 men and 2921,816 women. We employed a cross-classified multilevel logistic regression model to disentangle any net age, period and cohort effects on DA hospitalization rates.
We found distinct net age, period and cohort effects, each influencing the predicted probability of hospitalisation for DA in men and women. Peak age for DA in both sexes was 33-35 years; net period effects showed an increase in hospitalisation for DA from 1996 to 2001; and in birth cohorts 1968-1974, we saw a considerable reduction (around 75%) in predicted probability of hospitalisation for DA.
The use of hospital admissions could be regarded as a proxy of the population's health service use for DA. Our results may thus constitute a basis for effective prevention planning, treatment and other appropriate policy responses.
PubMed ID
24300899 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alcohol consumption has a protective effect against hematological malignancies: a population-based study in Sweden including 420,489 individuals with alcohol use disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262809
Source
Neoplasia. 2014 Mar;16(3):229-34, 234.e1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2014
Author
Jianguang Ji
Jan Sundquist
Kristina Sundquist
Source
Neoplasia. 2014 Mar;16(3):229-34, 234.e1
Date
Mar-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Alcoholism - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hematologic Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Leukemia - epidemiology - etiology
Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Myeloma - epidemiology - etiology
Odds Ratio
Registries
Risk factors
Siblings
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
It has been suggested that alcohol consumption is associated with increased risk of a few solid cancers, although studies that examined the association with hematological malignancies have shown inconsistent results. In this study, we examined the risk of hematological malignancies among individuals who had alcohol use disorders (AUDs) in Sweden.
Individuals with AUDs were identified from the nationwide Swedish Hospital Discharge Register and Outpatient Register, the Crime Register, and the Prescription Drug Register, and they were linked to the Swedish Cancer Registry to calculate standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) of hematological malignancies, using those Swedes without AUDs as a reference. In addition, we used a quasi-experimental sibling design to investigate the odds ratios among sibling pairs who were discordant with AUDs.
A total of 420,489 individuals were identified with AUDs. After more than 15 million person-years of follow-up, a total of 1755 individuals developed hematological malignancies demonstrating a low risk, i.e., SIR = 0.60 (95% confidence interval = 0.57-0.63). People with AUDs had low risks for developing specific types of malignancies. The lowest risk (0.51) was for leukemia, followed by myeloma (0.52), non-Hodgkin lymphoma (0.65), and Hodgkin disease (0.71). The risk was lower among AUDs identified at an older age. The low risks of hematological malignancies were also noted using sibling analysis.
Our data suggest that alcohol consumption has a protective effect against hematological malignancies. However, further studies are needed to identity the underlying mechanisms of the protective effect of alcohol consumption against hematological malignancies.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24783999 View in PubMed
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Alcohol use disorder and divorce: evidence for a genetic correlation in a population-based Swedish sample.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290102
Source
Addiction. 2017 Apr; 112(4):586-593
Publication Type
Journal Article
Twin Study
Date
Apr-2017
Author
Jessica E Salvatore
Sara Larsson Lönn
Jan Sundquist
Paul Lichtenstein
Kristina Sundquist
Kenneth S Kendler
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA.
Source
Addiction. 2017 Apr; 112(4):586-593
Date
Apr-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Twin Study
Keywords
Aged
Alcoholism - epidemiology - genetics
Divorce - statistics & numerical data
Environment
European Continental Ancestry Group - genetics
Female
Gene-Environment Interaction
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Registries
Risk factors
Siblings
Sweden - epidemiology
Twins, Dizygotic - genetics
Twins, Monozygotic - genetics
Abstract
We tested the association between alcohol use disorder (AUD) and divorce; estimated the genetic and environmental influences on divorce; estimated how much genetic and environmental influences accounted for covariance between AUD and divorce; and estimated latent genetic and environmental correlations between AUD and divorce. We tested sex differences in these effects.
We identified twin and sibling pairs with AUD and divorce information in Swedish national registers. We described the association between AUD and divorce using tetrachorics and used twin and sibling models to estimate genetic and environmental influences on divorce, on the covariance between AUD and divorce and the latent genetic and environmental correlations between AUD and divorce.
Sweden.
A total of 670?836 individuals (53% male) born 1940-1965.
Life-time measures of AUD and divorce.
AUD and divorce were related strongly (males: rtet  = +0.44, 95% CI = 0.43, 0.45; females rtet  = +0.37, 95% CI = 0.36, 0.38). Genetic factors accounted for a modest proportion of the variance in divorce (males: 21.3%, 95% CI = 7.6, 28.5; females: 31.0%, 95% CI = 18.8, 37.1). Genetic factors accounted for most of the covariance between AUD and divorce (males: 52.0%, 95% CI = 48.8, 67.9; females: 53.74%, 95% CI = 17.6, 54.5), followed by non-shared environmental factors (males: 45.0%, 95% CI = 37.5, 54.9; females: 41.6%, 95% CI = 40.3, 60.2). Shared environmental factors accounted for a negligible proportion of the covariance (males: 3.0%, 95% CI = -3.0, 13.5; females: 4.75%, 95% CI = 0.0, 6.6). The AUD-divorce genetic correlations were high (males: rA = +0.76, 95% CI = 0.53, 0.90; females +0.52, 95% CI = 0.24, 0.67). The non-shared environmental correlations were modest (males: rE = +0.32, 95% CI = 0.31, 0.40; females: +0.27, 95% CI = 0.27, 0.36).
Divorce and alcohol use disorder are correlated strongly in the Swedish population, and the heritability of divorce is consistent with previous studies. Covariation between AUD and divorce results from overlapping genetic and non-shared environmental factors. Latent genetic and non-shared environmental correlations for alcohol use disorder and divorce are high and moderate.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27981669 View in PubMed
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Alcohol Use Disorder and Mortality Across the Lifespan: A Longitudinal Cohort and Co-relative Analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282515
Source
JAMA Psychiatry. 2016 Jun 01;73(6):575-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-01-2016
Author
Kenneth S Kendler
Henrik Ohlsson
Jan Sundquist
Kristina Sundquist
Source
JAMA Psychiatry. 2016 Jun 01;73(6):575-81
Date
Jun-01-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Age of Onset
Aged
Alcoholism - genetics - mortality
Cause of Death
Cohort Studies
Diseases in Twins - genetics - mortality
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease - genetics
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Risk factors
Statistics as Topic
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
Excess alcohol consumption and alcohol use disorders (AUDs) are associated with substantially increased mortality. Efforts to reduce this toll require an understanding of their causes.
To clarify the degree to which the excess mortality associated with AUDs arises (1) from the predispositions of the person who develops AUD (and which would likely be shared by close relatives) and (2) as a direct result of AUD itself.
A prospective cohort and co-relative design study involving all individuals born in Sweden from 1940 to 1965 who had neither died nor migrated prior to 1973 or age 15 years (N?=?2?821?036). They were followed up from January 1, 1973, until December 31, 2010. Alcohol use disorder was assessed from medical, criminal, and pharmacy registries. Half-siblings, full-siblings, and monozygotic twin pairs discordant for AUD were obtained from the Multi-Generation and Twin Register.
Death obtained from the Swedish Death registry.
Our cohort (1?447?887 males and 1?373?149 females) included 131?895 males and 42?163 females registered with AUD. The mean (SD) age at first AUD registration was 39 (13.4) years. We ascertained 127?347 and 76?325 deaths in the male and female subsamples, respectively. Controlling for sex, educational status, and year of birth, the mortality hazard ratio associated with AUD was 5.83 (95% CI, 5.76-5.90) and varied-with an inverted U-shaped function-by age. Examining the AUD-mortality association in the general population and in relative pairs discordant for AUD exposure demonstrated substantial familial confounding in early to mid-adulthood: the AUD-associated mortality hazard ratio was much lower in discordant close relatives than in the general population. In middle to late adulthood, evidence for familial confounding decreased with increasing evidence for a direct effect of AUD on elevated mortality. In the oldest age group (65-70 years), the mortality hazard ratios were similar across the population and all relative pairs, suggesting that the excess mortality was largely a result of having AUD. Adding years since onset of AUD to the model showed that both increasing age and increasing years of duration of AUD contributed to the reduction of familial confounding in the association between AUD and elevated mortality.
Excess mortality associated with AUD arises both from the predispositions of the person who develops AUD and the direct result of having AUD. The effect of predisposition is more prominent early in the life course and in the early years of AUD. The direct effect of AUD becomes progressively more important later in life and with longer duration of AUD. These results have implications for interventions seeking to reduce the elevated AUD-associated mortality.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27097014 View in PubMed
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Alcohol Use Disorder and Risk of Suicide in a Swedish Population-Based Cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature306605
Source
Am J Psychiatry. 2020 07 01; 177(7):627-634
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
07-01-2020
Author
Alexis C Edwards
Henrik Ohlsson
Jan Sundquist
Kristina Sundquist
Kenneth S Kendler
Author Affiliation
Virginia Institute for Psychiatric and Behavioral Genetics, Department of Psychiatry, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond (Edwards, Kendler); Center for Primary Health Care Research, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden (Ohlsson, Jan Sundquist, Kristina Sundquist); and Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York (Kristina Sundquist).
Source
Am J Psychiatry. 2020 07 01; 177(7):627-634
Date
07-01-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcoholism - epidemiology - psychology
Comorbidity
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Suicide - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The authors examined the association between alcohol use disorder (AUD) and risk of suicide, before and after accounting for psychiatric comorbidity, and assessed the extent to which the observed association is due to a potentially causal mechanism or genetic and familial environmental confounding factors that increase risk for both.
Longitudinal population-wide Swedish medical, criminal, and pharmacy registries were used to evaluate the risk of death by suicide as a function of AUD history. Analyses employed prospective cohort and co-relative designs, including data on 2,229,880 native Swedes born between 1950 and 1970 and observed from age 15 until 2012.
The lifetime rate of suicide during the observation period was 3.54% for women and 3.94% for men with AUD, compared with 0.29% and 0.76% of women and men, respectively, without AUD. In adjusted analyses, AUD remained robustly associated with suicide: hazard ratios across observation periods ranged from 2.61 to 128.0 among women and from 2.44 to 28.0 among men. Co-relative analyses indicated that familial confounding accounted for some, but not all, of the observed association. A substantial and potentially causal relationship remained after accounting for a history of other psychiatric diagnoses.
AUD is a potent risk factor for suicide, with a substantial association persisting after accounting for confounding factors. These findings underscore the impact of AUD on suicide risk, even in the context of other mental illness, and implicate the time frame shortly after a medical or criminal AUD registration as critical for efforts to reduce alcohol-related suicide.
Notes
CommentIn: Am J Psychiatry. 2020 Jul 1;177(7):572-573 PMID 32605449
PubMed ID
32160767 View in PubMed
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