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Disentangling the mechanisms behind climate effects on zooplankton.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269701
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2016 Feb 1;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1-2016
Author
Kristina Ø Kvile
Øystein Langangen
Irina Prokopchuk
Nils C Stenseth
Leif C Stige
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2016 Feb 1;
Date
Feb-1-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Understanding how climate influences ecosystems is complicated by the many correlated and interrelated impacting factors. Here we quantify climate effects on Calanus finmarchicus in the northeastern Norwegian Sea and southwestern Barents Sea. By combining oceanographic drift models and statistical analyses of field data from 1959 to 1993 and investigating effects across trophic levels, we are able to elucidate pathways by which climate influences zooplankton. The results show that both chlorophyll biomass in spring and C. finmarchicus biomass in summer relate positively to a combination of shallow mixed layer depth and increased wind in spring, suggesting that C. finmarchicus biomass in summer is influenced by bottom-up effects of food availability. Furthermore, spatially resolved C. finmarchicus biomass in summer is linked to favorable transport from warmer, core areas to the south. However, increased mean temperature in spring does not lead to increased C. finmarchicus biomass in summer. Rather, spring biomass is generally higher, but population growth from spring to summer is lower, after a warm compared with a cold spring. Our study illustrates how improved understanding of climate effects can be obtained when different datasets and different methods are combined in a unified approach.
PubMed ID
26831099 View in PubMed
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Predator-prey interactions cause apparent competition between marine zooplankton groups.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature303052
Source
Ecology. 2018 03; 99(3):632-641
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
03-2018
Author
Leif Christian Stige
Kristina Ø Kvile
Bjarte Bogstad
Øystein Langangen
Author Affiliation
Centre for Ecological and Evolutionary Synthesis (CEES), Department of Biosciences, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1066, N-0316, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Ecology. 2018 03; 99(3):632-641
Date
03-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Animals
Biomass
Climate change
Ecosystem
Fishes
Population Dynamics
Zooplankton
Abstract
Predator-mediated apparent competition is an indirect negative interaction between two prey species mediated by a shared predator. Quantifying such indirect ecosystem effects is methodologically challenging but important for understanding ecosystem functioning. Still, there are few examples of apparent competition from pelagic marine environments. Using state-space statistical modeling, we here provide evidence for apparent competition between two dominant zooplankton groups in a large marine ecosystem, i.e., krill and copepods in the Barents Sea. This effect is mediated by a positive association between krill biomass and survival of the main planktivorous fish in the Barents Sea, capelin Mallotus villosus, and a negative association between capelin and copepod biomasses. The biomass of Atlantic krill species is expected to increase in the Barents Sea due to ongoing climate change, thereby potentially negatively affecting copepods through apparent competition. By demonstrating and quantifying apparent competition in a large marine ecosystem, our study paves the way for more realistic projections of indirect ecosystem effects of climate change and harvesting.
PubMed ID
29281755 View in PubMed
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Predator-prey interactions cause apparent competition between marine zooplankton groups.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287916
Source
Ecology. 2017 Dec 27;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-27-2017
Author
Leif Christian Stige
Kristina Ø Kvile
Bjarte Bogstad
Øystein Langangen
Source
Ecology. 2017 Dec 27;
Date
Dec-27-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Predator-mediated apparent competition is an indirect negative interaction between two prey species mediated by a shared predator. Quantifying such indirect ecosystem effects is methodologically challenging but important for understanding ecosystem functioning. Still, there are few examples of apparent competition from pelagic marine environments. Using state-space statistical modeling, we here provide evidence for apparent competition between two dominant zooplankton groups in a large marine ecosystem, i.e., krill and copepods in the Barents Sea. This effect is mediated by a positive association between krill biomass and survival of the main planktivorous fish in the Barents Sea, capelin Mallotus villosus, and a negative association between capelin and copepod biomasses. The biomass of Atlantic krill species is expected to increase in the Barents Sea due to ongoing climate change, thereby potentially negatively affecting copepods through apparent competition. By demonstrating and quantifying apparent competition in a large marine ecosystem, our study paves the way for more realistic projections of indirect ecosystem effects of climate change and harvesting.
PubMed ID
29281755 View in PubMed
Less detail