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A Case Study in Personal Identification and Social Determinants of Health: Unregistered Births among Indigenous People in Northern Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298329
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2019 Feb 16; 16(4):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Feb-16-2019
Author
Chris Sanders
Kristin Burnett
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology, Lakehead University, 955 Oliver Road, Thunder Bay, ON P7B 5E1, Canada. chris.sanders@lakeheadu.ca.
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2019 Feb 16; 16(4):
Date
Feb-16-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Under international law, birth registration is considered a human right because it determines access to important legal protections as well as essential services and social supports across the lifespan. Difficulties related to birth registration and the acquisition of personal identification (PID) are largely regarded as problems specific to low-income countries. For Indigenous people in northern and rural Canada, however, lack of PID, like birth certificates, is a common problem that is rooted in the geography of the region as well as historical and contemporary settler colonial policies. This communication elucidates the complicated terrain of unregistered births for those people living in northern Ontario in order to generate discussion about how the social determinants of health for Indigenous people in Canada are affected by PID. Drawing on intake surveys, qualitative interviews and participant observation field notes, we use the case study of "Susan" as an entry point to share insights into the "intergenerational problem" of unregistered births in the region. Susan's case speaks to how unregistered births and lack of PID disproportionately impacts the health and well-being of Indigenous people and communities in northern Ontario. The implications and the need for further research on this problem in Canada are discussed.
PubMed ID
30781459 View in PubMed
Less detail

A Case Study in Personal Identification and Social Determinants of Health: Unregistered Births among Indigenous People in Northern Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301324
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2019 02 16; 16(4):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
02-16-2019
Author
Chris Sanders
Kristin Burnett
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology, Lakehead University, 955 Oliver Road, Thunder Bay, ON P7B 5E1, Canada. chris.sanders@lakeheadu.ca.
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2019 02 16; 16(4):
Date
02-16-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Birth Certificates
Female
Human Rights
Humans
Indians, North American - ethnology
Ontario
Poverty
Rural Population
Social Determinants of Health
Social Support
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Under international law, birth registration is considered a human right because it determines access to important legal protections as well as essential services and social supports across the lifespan. Difficulties related to birth registration and the acquisition of personal identification (PID) are largely regarded as problems specific to low-income countries. For Indigenous people in northern and rural Canada, however, lack of PID, like birth certificates, is a common problem that is rooted in the geography of the region as well as historical and contemporary settler colonial policies. This communication elucidates the complicated terrain of unregistered births for those people living in northern Ontario in order to generate discussion about how the social determinants of health for Indigenous people in Canada are affected by PID. Drawing on intake surveys, qualitative interviews and participant observation field notes, we use the case study of "Susan" as an entry point to share insights into the "intergenerational problem" of unregistered births in the region. Susan's case speaks to how unregistered births and lack of PID disproportionately impacts the health and well-being of Indigenous people and communities in northern Ontario. The implications and the need for further research on this problem in Canada are discussed.
PubMed ID
30781459 View in PubMed
Less detail

Examining Indigenous food sovereignty as a conceptual framework for health in two urban communities in Northern Ontario, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299246
Source
Glob Health Promot. 2019 Apr; 26(3_suppl):54-63
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2019
Author
Lana Ray
Kristin Burnett
Anita Cameron
Serena Joseph
Joseph LeBlanc
Barbara Parker
Angela Recollet
Catherine Sergerie
Author Affiliation
1 Department of Indigenous Learning, Lakehead University, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Glob Health Promot. 2019 Apr; 26(3_suppl):54-63
Date
Apr-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
While land is a nexus for culture, identity, governance, and health, as a concept land is rarely addressed in conversations and policy decisions about Indigenous health and well-being. Indigenous food sovereignty, a concept which embodies Indigenous peoples' ability to control their food systems, including markets, production modes, cultures and environments, has received little attention as a framework to approach Indigenous health especially for Indigenous people living in urban spaces. Instead, discussions about Indigenous food sovereignty have largely focused on global and remote and rural communities. Addressing this gap in the literature, this article presents exploratory work conducted with Waasegiizhig Nanaandawe'iyewigamig and Shkagamik-Kwe Health Centre, two Indigenous-led Aboriginal Health Access Centres in urban service centers located in Northern Ontario, Canada.
PubMed ID
30964405 View in PubMed
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Indigenous Peoples, settler colonialism, and access to health care in rural and northern Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature304540
Source
Health Place. 2020 Nov; 66:102445
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-2020
Author
Kristin Burnett
Chris Sanders
Donna Halperin
Scott Halperin
Author Affiliation
Department of Indigenous Studies, Lakehead University, 955 Oliver Road, Thunder Bay, Ontario, P7B 5E1, Canada. Electronic address: kburnett@lakeheadu.ca.
Source
Health Place. 2020 Nov; 66:102445
Date
Nov-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
In Canada rural and northern communities, particularly Indigenous communities, face challenges disproportionate to their urban counterparts in accessing health care services. Existing health research on rural communities has tended to emphasize and reinforce the rural/urban dichotomy in access to and delivery of services, leaving the notion of "rural" as an under-interrogated concept. Drawing on a qualitative study of health care providers, community members, and Indigenous Elders, we explore Indigenous people's beliefs about vaccination to complicate notions of rurality in order to illuminate the ways in which space and settler colonialism both shape and limit choices around health care access.
PubMed ID
33032242 View in PubMed
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Retail food environments, shopping experiences, First Nations and the provincial Norths.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286482
Source
Health Promot Chronic Dis Prev Can. 2017 Oct;37(10):333-341
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2017
Author
Kristin Burnett
Kelly Skinner
Travis Hay
Joseph LeBlanc
Lori Chambers
Source
Health Promot Chronic Dis Prev Can. 2017 Oct;37(10):333-341
Date
Oct-2017
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
This paper looks at the market food environments of First Nations communities located in the provincial Norths by examining the potential retail competition faced by the North West Company (NWC) and by reporting on the grocery shopping experiences of people living in northern Canada.
We employed two methodological approaches to assess northern retail food environments. First, we mapped food retailers in the North to examine the breadth of retail competition in the provincial Norths, focussing specifically on those communities without year-round road access. Second, we surveyed people living in communities in northern Canada about their retail and shopping experiences.
Fifty-four percent of communities in the provincial Norths and Far North without year-round road access did not have a grocery store that competed with the NWC. The provinces with the highest percentage of northern communities without retail competition were Ontario (87%), Saskatchewan (83%) and Manitoba (72%). Respondents to the survey (n = 92) expressed concern about their shopping experiences in three main areas: the cost of food, food quality and freshness, and availability of specific foods.
There is limited retail competition in the provincial Norths. In Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Ontario, the NWC has no store competition in at least 70% of northern communities. Consumers living in northern Canada find it difficult to afford nutritious foods and would like access to a wider selection of perishable foods in good condition.
PubMed ID
29043760 View in PubMed
Less detail

Retail food environments, shopping experiences, First Nations and the provincial Norths.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295632
Source
Health Promot Chronic Dis Prev Can. 2017 Oct; 37(10):333-341
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-2017
Author
Kristin Burnett
Kelly Skinner
Travis Hay
Joseph LeBlanc
Lori Chambers
Author Affiliation
Department of Indigenous Learning, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Health Promot Chronic Dis Prev Can. 2017 Oct; 37(10):333-341
Date
Oct-2017
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Canada
Economic Competition
Food - economics
Food Industry - methods - organization & administration
Food Supply - methods - standards - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Manitoba
Marketing
Ontario
Saskatchewan
Abstract
This paper looks at the market food environments of First Nations communities located in the provincial Norths by examining the potential retail competition faced by the North West Company (NWC) and by reporting on the grocery shopping experiences of people living in northern Canada.
We employed two methodological approaches to assess northern retail food environments. First, we mapped food retailers in the North to examine the breadth of retail competition in the provincial Norths, focussing specifically on those communities without year-round road access. Second, we surveyed people living in communities in northern Canada about their retail and shopping experiences.
Fifty-four percent of communities in the provincial Norths and Far North without year-round road access did not have a grocery store that competed with the NWC. The provinces with the highest percentage of northern communities without retail competition were Ontario (87%), Saskatchewan (83%) and Manitoba (72%). Respondents to the survey (n = 92) expressed concern about their shopping experiences in three main areas: the cost of food, food quality and freshness, and availability of specific foods.
There is limited retail competition in the provincial Norths. In Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Ontario, the NWC has no store competition in at least 70% of northern communities. Consumers living in northern Canada find it difficult to afford nutritious foods and would like access to a wider selection of perishable foods in good condition.
Cet article porte sur l'environnement de la vente d’aliments dans les collectivités des Premières nations du nord des provinces, en particulier sur la concurrence éventuelle dans la vente au détail de la North West Company (NWC) ainsi que sur les expériences d'achats alimentaires de la population vivant dans le Nord canadien.
Nous avons utilisé deux méthodologies pour évaluer l’environnement alimentaire de la vente au détail dans le Nord. D’abord, nous avons cartographié les détaillants en alimentation du Nord afin d’examiner le degré de concurrence au détail dans les régions nordiques, en prêtant une attention particulière aux collectivités qui ne sont pas accessibles à l’année par la route. Ensuite, nous avons enquêté auprès des personnes vivant dans les collectivités du Nord canadien à propos de leurs expériences d’achat au détail et de magasinage.
Cinquante-quatre pour cent des collectivités du nord des provinces et du Grand Nord n’avaient aucune épicerie en concurrence avec la NWC. Les provinces comptant les plus fortes proportions de collectivités nordiques sans concurrence dans la vente au détail étaient l’Ontario (87 %), la Saskatchewan (83 %) et le Manitoba (72 %). Les participants au sondage (n = 92) ont fait état de leurs préoccupations quant à leurs expériences d'achat dans trois grands secteurs : le coût des aliments, la qualité et la fraîcheur des aliments et la disponibilité de certains aliments.
La concurrence dans la vente au détail est limitée dans le nord des provinces. Au Manitoba, en Saskatchewan et en Ontario, la NWC ne fait face à aucune concurrence dans au moins 70 % des collectivités nordiques. Les consommateurs du Nord canadien considèrent que les aliments nutritifs sont peu abordables, et ils souhaitent avoir accès à un plus grand choix d’aliments périssables en bon état.
Notes
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2010 May-Jun;101(3):196-201 PMID 20737808
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017;76(1):1279451 PMID 28151097
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2014 Jan;17(1):31-9 PMID 23806766
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2008 Mar-Apr;99(2):95-7 PMID 18457280
Cites: Can Bull Med Hist. 2012 Fall;29(2):309-328 PMID 28155548
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2013 May 02;13:427 PMID 23639143
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2016 Jun 09;107(Suppl 1):5344 PMID 27281520
PubMed ID
29043760 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.