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Population-wide changes in reported lifestyle are associated with redistribution of adipose tissue.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90451
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2009 Jul;37(5):545-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2009
Author
Krachler Benno
Eliasson Mats
Stenlund Hans
Johansson Ingegerd
Hallmans Goran
Lindahl Bernt
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Kalix Hospital, Kalix, Sweden. benno.krachler@medicin.umu.se.
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2009 Jul;37(5):545-53
Date
Jul-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
AIMS: The Northern Sweden MONICA project 1986-2004 demonstrated a marked increase in average body mass, an unchanged prevalence of diabetes, and a decrease in myocardial infarctions and lately also in stroke. This study estimates the relative importance of time-trends in lifestyle on average waist and hip circumference on a population level. METHODS: From a series of independent cross-sectional surveys, a study population of 2,831 men and 2,976 women was formed. Associations between lifestyle factors and waist and hip circumference were estimated. Partial regression coefficients for every level of the lifestyle factors were multiplied by the differences in the proportion of the population reporting the corresponding levels of the respective lifestyle factors in 1986 and 2004. The sum of the product terms for each item represents the respective estimated impact of change in waist and hip circumference. RESULTS: Lifestyle trends associated with changes in hip circumference were (women/men): higher education level (+4.0 mm/+2.4 mm), fewer smokers (+0.4 mm/+0.9 mm), a slight increase in alcohol consumption (+0.4 mm/+0.3 mm), and more saturated fat from meat in women (-0.9 mm) and more fibre from grains in men (+0.6 mm). Average waist circumference was influenced by increased levels of physical activity (-2.2 mm/-4.6 mm), fewer female smokers (-0.3 mm), and a higher intake of saturated fatty acids from meat among men (+1.8 mm). CONCLUSIONS: We identified physical activity and the intake of meat and whole-grain products as prime candidates for lifestyle interventions in northern Sweden.
PubMed ID
19141545 View in PubMed
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Reported food intake and distribution of body fat: a repeated cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79316
Source
Nutr J. 2006;5:34
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Krachler Benno
Eliasson Mats
Stenlund Hans
Johansson Ingegerd
Hallmans Göran
Lindahl Bernt
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Kalix Hospital, Kalix, Sweden. benno.krachler@medicin.umu.se
Source
Nutr J. 2006;5:34
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anthropometry
Body Fat Distribution
Cereals
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet
Diet Records
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Energy intake
Female
Fruit
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Sweden
Vegetables
Waist-Hip Ratio
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Body mass, as well as distribution of body fat, are predictors of both diabetes and cardiovascular disease. In Northern Sweden, despite a marked increase in average body mass, prevalence of diabetes was stagnant and myocardial infarctions decreased. A more favourable distribution of body fat is a possible contributing factor.This study investigates the relative importance of individual food items for time trends in waist circumference (WC) and hip circumference (HC) on a population level. METHODS: Independent cross-sectional surveys conducted in 1986, 1990, 1994 and 1999 in the two northernmost counties of Sweden with a common population of 250,000. Randomly selected age stratified samples, altogether 2982 men and 3087 women aged 25-64 years. Questionnaires were completed and anthropometric measurements taken. For each food item, associations between frequency of consumption and waist and hip circumferences were estimated. Partial regression coefficients for every level of reported intake were multiplied with differences in proportion of the population reporting the corresponding levels of intake in 1986 and 1999. The sum of these product terms for every food item was the respective estimated impact on mean circumference. RESULTS: Time trends in reported food consumption associated with the more favourable gynoid distribution of adipose tissue were increased use of vegetable oil, pasta and 1.5% fat milk. Trends associated with abdominal obesity were increased consumption of beer in men and higher intake of hamburgers and French fried potatoes in women. CONCLUSION: Food trends as markers of time trends in body fat distribution have been identified. The method is a complement to conventional approaches to establish associations between food intake and disease risk on a population level.
PubMed ID
17187681 View in PubMed
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