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The association between pelvic girdle pain and sick leave during pregnancy; a retrospective study of a Norwegian population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274088
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2015;15:237
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Stefan Malmqvist
Inger Kjaermann
Knut Andersen
Inger Økland
Jan Petter Larsen
Kolbjørn Brønnick
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2015;15:237
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adult
Disability Evaluation
Educational Status
Female
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Lifting
Norway - epidemiology
Pain Measurement
Pelvic Girdle Pain - epidemiology
Physical Exertion
Posture
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Sick Leave - statistics & numerical data
Sleep Wake Disorders - epidemiology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Workload - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
The incidence of pelvic girdle pain (PGP) in pregnancy is wide ranged depending on definition, the utilised diagnostic means, and the design of the studies. PGP during pregnancy has negative effects on activities of daily living and causes long sick leave, which makes it a major public health issue. Our objectives were to explore the frequency of sick leave in pregnancy due to PGP, assess the relationship between different types of pain-related activities of daily living, examine physical workload, type of work in relation to sick leave, and to explore factors that make women less likely to take sick leave for PGP.
All women giving birth at the maternity ward of Stavanger University Hospital, Norway, were asked to participate and complete a questionnaire on demographic features, PGP, pain-related activities of daily living, sick leave in general and for PGP, frequency of exercising before and during pregnancy. Drawings of pelvic girdle and low back area were used for the localization of pain. PGP intensity was then rated retrospectively on a numerical rating scale. Non-parametric tests, multinomial logistic regression and sequential linear regression analysis were used in the statistical analysis.
PGP is a frequent and major cause of sick leave during pregnancy among Norwegian women, which is also reflected in activities of daily living as measured with scores on all Oswestry disability index items. In the multivariate analysis of factors related to sick leave and PGP we found that work satisfaction, problems with lifting and sleeping, and pain intensity were risk factors for sick leave. In addition, women with longer education, higher work satisfaction and fewer problems with sitting, walking and standing, were less likely to take sick leave in pregnancy, despite the same pain intensity as women being on sick leave.
A coping factor in pregnant women with PGP was discovered, most likely dependant on education, associated with work situation and/or work posture, which decreases sick leave. We recommend these issues to be further examined in a prospective longitudinal study since it may have important implications for sick leave frequency during pregnancy.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26437972 View in PubMed
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Characteristics and predictors for hospitalizations of home-dwelling older persons receiving community care: a cohort study from Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299876
Source
BMC Geriatr. 2018 09 03; 18(1):203
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
09-03-2018
Author
Martha Therese Gjestsen
Kolbjørn Brønnick
Ingelin Testad
Author Affiliation
Centre for age-related medicine (SESAM), Stavanger University Hospital, Stavanger, Norway. martha.therese.gjestsen@sus.no.
Source
BMC Geriatr. 2018 09 03; 18(1):203
Date
09-03-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Delivery of Health Care, Integrated - organization & administration
Female
Frail Elderly
Geriatric Assessment
Home Care Services - organization & administration
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Independent living
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
Older persons are substantial consumers of both hospital- and community care, and there are discussions regarding the potential for preventing hospitalizations through high quality community care. The present study report prevalence and factors associated with admissions to hospital for community-dwelling older persons (>?67 years of age), receiving community care in a Norwegian municipality.
This was a cohort study of 1531 home-dwelling persons aged =67 years, receiving community care. We retrospectively scrutinized admissions to hospital for the study cohort over a one-year period in 2013. The frequency of admissions was evaluated with regard to association with age (age groups 67-79 years, 80-89 years and?=?90 year) and gender. The hospital admission incidence was calculated by dividing the number of admissions by the number of individuals included in the study cohort, stratified by age and gender. The association between age and gender as potential predictors and hospitalization (outcome) was first examined in univariate analyses followed by multinomial regression analyses in order to investigate the associations between age and gender with different causes of hospitalization.
We identified a total of 1457 admissions, represented by 739 unique individuals, of which 64% were women, and an estimated mean age of 83 years. Mean admission rate was 2 admissions per person-year (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.89-2.11). The admission rate varied with age, and hospital incidents rates were higher for men in all age groups. The overall median length of stay was 4 days. The most common reason for hospitalization was the need for further medical assessment (23%). We found associations between increasing age and hospitalizations due to physical general decline, and associations between male gender and hospitalizations due to infections (e.g., airways infections, urinary tract infections).
We found the main reasons for hospitalizations to be related to falls, infections and general decline/pain/unspecified dyspnea. Men were especially at risk for hospitalization as they age. Our study have identified some clinically relevant factors that are vital in understanding what health care personnel in community care need to be especially aware of in order to prevent hospitalizations for this population.
PubMed ID
30176794 View in PubMed
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CSF amyloid-beta and tau proteins, and cognitive performance, in early and untreated Parkinson's disease: the Norwegian ParkWest study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142857
Source
J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 2010 Oct;81(10):1080-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
Guido Alves
Kolbjørn Brønnick
Dag Aarsland
Kaj Blennow
Henrik Zetterberg
Clive Ballard
Martin Wilhelm Kurz
Ulf Andreasson
Ole-Bjørn Tysnes
Jan Petter Larsen
Ezra Mulugeta
Author Affiliation
The Norwegian Centre for Movement Disorders, Stavanger University Hospital, Stavanger, Norway. algu@sus.no
Source
J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 2010 Oct;81(10):1080-6
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alzheimer Disease - cerebrospinal fluid
Amyloid beta-Peptides - cerebrospinal fluid
Apolipoproteins E - genetics
Biological Markers - cerebrospinal fluid
Cognition Disorders - cerebrospinal fluid - psychology
Female
Genotype
Humans
Male
Neuropsychological Tests
Norway
Parkinson Disease - cerebrospinal fluid - psychology
Peptide Fragments - cerebrospinal fluid
tau Proteins - cerebrospinal fluid
Abstract
Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology is found in a considerable portion of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), particularly those with early dementia (PDD). Altered cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of amyloid-ß (Aß) and tau proteins have been found in PDD, with intermediate changes for Aß42 in non-demented PD. The authors investigated whether AD-related CSF protein levels are altered and relate to neuropsychological performance in early, untreated PD.
CSF concentrations of Aß42, Aß40 and Aß38 were measured by electrochemiluminiscene and levels of total tau (T-tau) and phosphorylated tau (P-tau) by ELISA in 109 newly diagnosed, unmedicated, non-demented, community-based PD patients who had undergone comprehensive neuropsychological testing, and were compared with those of 36 age-matched normal controls and 20 subjects with mild AD.
PD patients displayed significant reductions in Aß42 (19%; p=0.009), Aß40 (15.5%; p=0.008) and Aß38 (23%; p=0.004) but not T-tau (p=0.816) or P-tau (p=0.531) compared with controls. CSF Aß42 reductions in PD were less marked than in AD (53%; p=0.002). Sequential regression analyses demonstrated significant associations between CSF levels of Aß42 (ß=0.205; p=0.019), Aß40 (ß=0.378; p
PubMed ID
20547614 View in PubMed
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Prediction of driving ability after inconclusive neuropsychological investigation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152149
Source
Brain Inj. 2009 Apr;23(4):313-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2009
Author
Alice Alexandersen
Knut Dalen
Kolbjørn Brønnick
Author Affiliation
Medical Division, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Lassa, Stavanger University Hospital, Norway. alice.alexandersen@sus.no
Source
Brain Inj. 2009 Apr;23(4):313-21
Date
Apr-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attention
Automobile Driving
Central Nervous System Diseases - rehabilitation
Disability Evaluation
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Neurologic Examination - standards
Neuropsychological Tests - standards
Norway
Predictive value of tests
Prognosis
Psychomotor Performance
Reaction Time
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to investigate the predictive value of neuropsychological tests for on-road evaluation outcome after inconclusive assessment.
Thirty-five patients were assessed neurologically, neuropsychologically by traditional clinical tests and by on-road evaluation. Simple univariate tests, logistic regression and ROC-curve analysis were used to investigate the predictive power of different neuropsychological tests.
Six measures from the California Computerized Assessment Package (CalCAP) and the Digit-Symbol test from Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale predicted the outcome of the on-road evaluation. A logistic regression analysis showed that a model with two variables from CalCAP and the Digit Symbol test predicted the results of the on-road driving evaluation with an overall accuracy of 84.8%.
The findings indicate that the outcome of on-road assessment is most related to cognitive skills such as attention and processing speed in combination with cognitive flexibility.
PubMed ID
19274519 View in PubMed
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Prevalence of low back and pelvic pain during pregnancy in a Norwegian population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124043
Source
J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2012 May;35(4):272-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2012
Author
Stefan Malmqvist
Inger Kjaermann
Knut Andersen
Inger Økland
Kolbjørn Brønnick
Jan Petter Larsen
Author Affiliation
The Department of Health Studies, University of Stavanger, and The Norwegian Centre for Movement Disorders, Stavanger University Hospital, Stavanger, Norway. stefan.malmqvist@uis.no
Source
J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2012 May;35(4):272-8
Date
May-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Low Back Pain - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Pelvic Pain - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to investigate the cumulative prevalence of low back pain (LBP), pelvic pain (PP), and lumbopelvic pain during pregnancy, including features possibly associated with development of pregnancy-related PP, in an unselected population of women.
A retrospective cohort study was conducted in which all women giving birth at Stavanger University hospital in a 4-month period were asked to participate and to fill in a questionnaire on demographic features, pain, disability, and Oswestry Disability Index. Inclusion criteria were singleton pregnancy of at least 36 weeks and competence in the Norwegian language.
Nearly 50% of the women experienced moderate and severe PP during pregnancy. Approximately 50% of them had PP syndrome, whereas the other half experienced lumbopelvic pain. Ten percent of the women experienced moderate and severe LBP alone. These pain syndromes increased sick leave and impaired general level of function during pregnancy. Approximately 50% of women with PP had pain in the area of the symphysis. The analysis of risk factors did not present a unidirectional and clear picture.
Pelvic pain in pregnant women is a health care challenge in which moderate and severe pain develops rather early and has important implications for society. The observed associations between possible causative factors and moderate and severe LBP and PP in this study may, together with results from other studies, bring some valuable insights into their multifactorial influences and provide background information for future studies.
PubMed ID
22632586 View in PubMed
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Public attitudes towards involuntary admission and treatment by mental health services in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294910
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2017 Nov - Dec; 55:1-7
Publication Type
Journal Article
Author
Inge Joa
Kjetil Hustoft
Liss Gøril Anda
Kolbjørn Brønnick
Olav Nielssen
Jan Olav Johannessen
Johannes H Langeveld
Author Affiliation
Network for Clinical Psychosis Research, Division of Psychiatry, Stavanger University Hospital, Norway; Network for Medical Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Stavanger, Norway. Electronic address: ijo@sus.no.
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2017 Nov - Dec; 55:1-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Attitude to Health
Commitment of Mentally Ill
Female
Hospitalization
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Mental Disorders - psychology - therapy
Mental health services
Middle Aged
Norway
Public Opinion
Surveys and Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
The role of compulsory treatment of serious mental disorders has been the topic of ongoing public debate involving among others mental health professionals, service providers, service user advocates, relatives of service users, media commentators and politicians. However, relatively little is known about general public attitudes towards involuntary admission and compulsory treatment of people with various mental disorders. This article examines the attitudes in a representative sample of Norway's population towards the use of involuntary admission and treatment, and under which circumstances does the general public consider compulsory treatment to be justified in the Norwegian mental health care services.
Data were collected from a representative sample of the population in Norway aged 18 and older. The sample was stratified for gender, geographical region and age distribution (n=2001). The survey was performed in the months of May 2009 (n=1000) and May 2011 (n=1001), using Computer Assisted Telephone Interviews (CATI) by an independent polling company. All respondents were provided a general definition of coercive intervention before the interview was conducted.
Univariate descriptions and bivariate analyses were performed by means of cross-tabulation, analysis of variance (one-way ANOVA) and comparing of group of means. Cohen's d was used as the measure for effect size.
Between 87% and 97% of those surveyed expressed strong or partial agreement with the use of involuntary admissions or compulsory treatment related to specified cases and situations. The majority of interviewees (56%) expressed the opinion that overall, current levels are acceptable. A further, 34% were of the opinion that current levels are too low, while only 9.9% of respondents supported a reduction in the level of involuntary treatment. Lower levels of education were associated with a more positive attitude towards involuntary admission and treatment. There was stronger support for admission to prevent suicide than the possibility of violence by the mentally ill.
The Norwegian adult population largely supports current legislation and practices regarding involuntary admission and compulsory treatment in the mental health services.
PubMed ID
29157507 View in PubMed
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Voluntary or involuntary acute psychiatric hospitalization in Norway: A 24h follow up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298276
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2018 Jan - Feb; 56:27-34
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Author
Kjetil Hustoft
Tor Ketil Larsen
Kolbjørn Brønnick
Inge Joa
Jan Olav Johannessen
Torleif Ruud
Author Affiliation
Division of Psychiatry, Center of Clinical Research in Psychosis, Stavanger University Hospital, Stavanger, Norway. Electronic address: kjetil.hustoft@sus.no.
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2018 Jan - Feb; 56:27-34
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Coercion
Commitment of Mentally Ill - legislation & jurisprudence
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hospitalization
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Patient Rights
Prospective Studies
Young Adult
Abstract
The Norwegian Mental Health Care Act states that patients who are involuntarily admitted to a hospital must be reevaluated by a psychiatrist or a specialist in clinical psychology within 24h to assess whether the patient fulfills the legal criteria for the psychiatric status and symptoms. International research on the use of coercive hospitalization in psychiatry is scarce, and an investigation of Norway's routine re-evaluation of involuntarily referred patients may expand knowledge about this aspect of psychiatric treatment. The aim of this study was to investigate the extent to which Involuntarily Hospitalized (IH) patients were converted to a Voluntary Hospitalization (VH), and to identify predictive factors leading to conversion. The Multi-center Acute Psychiatry study (MAP) included all cases of acute consecutive psychiatric admissions across twenty Norwegian acute psychiatric units in health trusts in Norway across 3months in 2005-06, representing about 75% of the psychiatric acute emergency units in Norway. The incident of conversion from involuntarily hospitalization (IH) to voluntary hospitalization (VH) was analyzed using generalized linear mixed modeling. Out of 3338 patients referred for admission, 1468 were IH (44%) and 1870 were VH. After re-evaluation, 1148 (78.2%) remained on involuntary hospitalization, while 320 patients (21.8%) were converted to voluntary hospitalization. The predictors of conversion from involuntary to voluntary hospitalization after re-evaluation of a specialist included patients wanting admission, better scores on Global Assessment of Symptom scale, fewer hallucinations and delusions and higher alcohol intake.
The 24h re-evaluation period for patients referred for involuntary hospitalization, as stipulated by the Norwegian Mental Health Care Act, appeared to give adequate opportunity to reduce unnecessary involuntary hospitalization, while safeguarding the patient's right to VH.
PubMed ID
29701596 View in PubMed
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